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Publication numberUS2275295 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1942
Filing dateAug 12, 1939
Priority dateAug 12, 1939
Publication numberUS 2275295 A, US 2275295A, US-A-2275295, US2275295 A, US2275295A
InventorsGeorge H Greenway
Original AssigneeGeorge H Greenway
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air conditioning unit
US 2275295 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 3, 1942. G. H. GREENWAY 2,275,295

AIR CONDITIONING UNIT Filed Aug. 12, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 r r/Z 22 Z5 Z4 z 25 z Z7 27 32 Patented Mar. 3, 1942 UNITED STATES I PATENT OFFICE 2,215,295 Am coNn'moNnsG UNIT George H. Greenway. Dallas, Tex.

Application August 12, 1939, Serial No. 289,729

7 (CL sz-m) 6 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in air conditioning units.

One object of the invention is to provide an improved air conditioning unit which may be readily and easily installed and which emciently cools, dehumidifles, cleans and circulates the air within a room, or other enclosure, wherein it is located.

An important object of the invention is to provide an improved air conditioning unit which properly conditions the air within a room in a relatively short time and which is so constructed that a large amount of fresh air may be constantly supplied to the room, which is essential to healthful, as well as comfortable, conditioning of the room air, thereby avoiding recirculation of all of the used air in said room.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved unit, of the character described, wherein a small volume of air is conditioned at one time so as to reduce the temperature and relative humidity thereof to a comparatively low degree, th conditioned air then being admixed with a portion of the room air before it is ejected into said room. whereby efllcient air conditioning is performed gradually and evenly without setting up a draft of unpleasantly cold air; the construction of the unit being such that rapid circulation and conditioning is made possible.

A particular object of the invention is to provide an improved conditioning unit having means for admixing room air with conditioned air so as to materially moderate the latter and gradually reduce the temperature and relative humidity of the former, said means being adjustable whereby its capacity for room air may be varied in accordance with the size of the room to be conditioned.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved conditioning unit having means for cooling and absorbing moisture from, or dehumidifying, the air which means is inclined away from the outlet of said unit, whereby the absorbed moisture will be directed out of the path of said air to eliminate the danger of the same being picked up and carried through said outlet into the room.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved unit, of the character described, which is portable, being small and compact, and which is adapted to be mounted on the wall of a room adjacent its ceiling, or on the ceiling, since it is of shallow depth, whereby all available floor space of the room remains unoccupied and due toits position initially conditions the most undesirable air and incidently promotes and induces proper circulation of air within said room.

A construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described, together with other features of the invention.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings, in

which an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:

Figure 1 is an isometric view of an air conditioning unit, constructed in accordance with the invention, and shown mounted on one wall of a room,

Fzgure 2 is an enlarged, front elevation of the uni Figure 3 is an enlarged side elevation of said unit, showing the discharge outlet and adjustable jet in dotted lines,

Figure 4 is a view, partly in section and partly in elevation, taken vertically and longitudinally through the unit,

Figure 5 is a transverse, vertical, sectional view, taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 4, and

Figure 6 is a reduced side elevation of a slightly modified form of the unit adapted to be mounted on or suspended from the ceiling.

In the drawings, the numeral I 0 designates a casing or cabinet, of a general rectangular shape, which has considerably greater height and width than depth and which may be constructed of metal, wood or other suitable material. The cabinet is provided with a flat rear wall II, top l2, bottom I3 and relatively narrow end walls I4. An arcuate or semi-circular extension I5 is made integral with the upper end of each wall It at its forward vertical edge, while an angular projection It is formed therebelow. The upper and lower marginal edges of the projection it are inclined forwardly or outwardly toward each other and the outer portion extends vertically, as is clearly shown in Figure 3. The forward wall or front ll of the cabinet is provided with an offset, semi-circular or arcuate portion I! at its upper end which extends longitudinally thereacross and has its vertical edges overlying the extensions ii of the end walls. Substantially the entire portion I8 is open as shown at It and is arranged to receive a longitudinal, semi-circular or curved grill 20 which may be secured therein in any suitable manner (Figures 2 and 5).

The cabinet is adapted to be mounted within each room or area A, the interior of which is to be conditioned, on one of the walls B thereof, preferably, adjacent its ceiling C. Thus, the rear wall ii of the cabinet lies contiguous to the wall B, while the top I! is in close proximity to the ceiling, as is clearly shown in Figure 1. One or more of the windows D of the room may be opened from the top, whereby entry of fresh, outside air into said room is permitted. With the cabinet disposed in this position, ideal circulation of air within the room is made possible and proper conditioning of said air facilitated.

A centrifugal impeller or blower II is mounted in the upper end of the cabinet within the offset portion [8 and adjacent each end wall of said cabinet (Figure The impellers are spaced apart and are connected to the drive shaft 22 of a suitable electric motor 23 which is positioned therebetween, as shown in Figure 4. Each impeller is provided with the usual cylindrical hood or casing 24 which has diametrically-opposed flared openings 25 in its ends for drawing air from the exterior of the cabinet through the grill 20. An enlarged discharge flue 26 is made integral with each hood so as to force and direct a blast of air downwardly into the interior of the cabinet.

An air cleaner or filter 21 of spun glass, metal or other suitable material, extends transversely across the interior of the cabinet immediately below the discharge end of the flue 26, whereby the air discharged from the impellers is thoroughly cleaned of dust, pollen and other extraneous matter. The filter is inclined downwardly and rearwardly of the cabinet so that excess moisture and xtraneous matter will tend to be directed toward the back of said cabinet. The entire lower portion of the cabinet below the filter may be lined with refractory material or satisfactory insulating material, as shown at 28.

A cooling element 28 is positioned within the upper end of the insulated portion of the cabinet and includes a continuous cooling coil 30 and spaced, transverse, vertical fins 3|. As is clearly shown in Figures 4 and 5, the coil 30 extends back and forth across the length of the cabinet so as to cover substantially the entire area of the interior thereof, whereby air flowing through said cabinet will contact the coil and fins. A suitable refrigerant, such as ice water, having a temperature of about 40 R, is circulated through the coil by means of the inlet and discharge pipes 32 which are adapted to be connected to a source of supply (not shown). It is pointed out that the coil and the upper and lower edges of the fins are inclined rearwardly and downwardly so as to induce and encourage excess moisture or water to drain to and accumulate at the rear of the cabinet out of the path of the air passing through the cooling element. Thus, the water may drip down the rear wall ll of the cabinet and escape through a discharge pipe 33 mounted in the bottom iii of said cabinet.

A longitudinally-extending opening 34 is located in the front ll of the cabinet below the cooling element 29 and is spacedfrom the bottom I3. The opening extends substantially en tirely across the cabinet and serves as a discharge for the conditioned air escaping from the interior of the cabinet into the room to be conditioned. A pair of elongate, angle irons 35 are secured to the external surface of the front i1 by we1ding,.or other suitable means, one below and one above the opening 34, as shown in Figure 5. The outwardly directed flanges of the angle irons are bent or inclined inwardly, at an angle to the horizontal, toward each whereby the area or size of the discharge opening is reduced to form an elongate nozzle.

A rectangular mixing member 38- extends longitudinally across the front of the cabinet between the forwardly projecting extensions ii of the end walls I and is provided with upper and lower horizontal bars 31 which are curved or arcuate in cross-section. These bars are disposed immediately above and below the opening 34 and nozzle 35 with their curved surfaces directed toward each other and said nozzle. For adjustably other,

mounting the member 38 between the extensions l6, each end section of said member is provided with a pair of vertically-alined bolts and nuts II which engage within elongated horizontal slots 3! formed in each extension, as shown in Figure 3. By moving the bolts backward and forward within their respective slots, the position of the mixing member may be changed to vary the distance between said member and the nozzle 35.

With the above arrangement, it is manifest that when cold or conditioned air is ejected from the nozzle, warm room air is drawn through the openings between the curved surfaces of the bars 3! and said nozzle, whereby the temperature of said cold air is materially moderated. Thus, a Venturi type of discharge is provided which is adjustable to the size of the room or area to be conditioned and which only slightly reduces the temperature and relative humidity of the air ejected therefrom. It is pointed out that the position of the mixing member determines the amount or quantity of room air admixed with the conditioned air and that said amount may be materially decreased by moving the same rearwardly toward the nozzle. Obviously, a blast of extremely cold air, which is unpleasant and unhealthy, is avoided by this unique structure which is an important feature of the invention.

when the impellers 2| are operating, air is drawn from the room A and is forced downwardly through the filter 21 where it is thoroughly cleaned of dust, pollen and extraneous matter. A portion of this air may be fresh air admitted into the room through the open window D. The air then passes between the cooling coils ll and fins 3| of the cooling element where it is cooled as well as dehumidifled. Due to the inclination of the coils and the transverse edges of the fins, moisture absorbed by the cold surfaces of said coils and fins will flow rearwardly of the cabinet out of the path of the air passing therethrough and will escape through the pipe 33. The relatively cold, dehumidified air will then pass outwardly through the opening 34, nozzle 35 and mixing member 38 where it will be admixed with a predetermined portion of the warm, humid room air, whereby a moderated stream of conditioned air is delivered to the room, as hereinbefore set forth. While the admixed room and reconditioned air is being discharged into the room, the impellers 2| are constantly drawing'more air into the cabinet 50 as to continue the conditioning operation.

It is pointed out that the capacity and number of impellers or blowers used depends upon the size of the room or area to be conditioned, and that one impeller might be suflicient for a very small room. Obviously, an air conditioning unit constructed in accordance with the invention herein set out may be housed within a comparatively small cabinet or casing which takes up very little space and does not require a complicated system of duct in order to accomplish garages circulation. as well as properconditioning. The shallow depth and light weight of the cabinet out materially injuring the appearance or utility thereof. It is further noted that this self-contained unit is arranged to be mounted in each room or area to be conditioned and is not dependent upon any other mechanism other than the means for supplying a refrigerant to the continuous coil 30. Since an individual unit is provided for each room, any danger of spreading contagious diseases is reduced to 'a minimum. The presence of stale or foul air within the room is obviated by the constant entry of 'fresh air through the opened window or windows.

In some instances, it might be desirable, due to the height of the room, its use, arrangement or the position of its openings, to mount the air conditioning unit on the ceiling C, as shown in Figure 6. This modified form of cabinet 40 is similar to the preferred form and has substantially the same external appearance. The discharge opening with its nozzle and adjustable mixing is disposed at the lower end of the cabinet as shown at ll instead of on the front, while the water discharge pipe 42 islocated in said front which extends parallel to the ceiling. It is pointed out that the cooling element and filter are inclined downwardly and forwardly toward the cabinet front, as shown in dotted lines at 43, whereby excess moisture or water is directed toward the same so as to escape through the pipe 42. The operation of this form of the invention is the same as that of the preferred form.

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction, may be made, within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. An air conditioning unit adapted to be mounted adjacent the ceiling of a room including, an elongate casing having an air inlet at its upper end which inlet extends substantially throughout the longitudinal width thereof, a curved grille covering said inlet, an air outlet extending substantially throughout the width of the casing at its lower end, air-current impellers disposed within the casing adjacent the inlet for circulating air downwardly through the casing, and a cooling unit mounted within the casin and having transverse coils and also having upright fins mounted on said coils, said fins having their bottom edges inclined in a direction to cause droplets of water to gravitate out of the path of the air currents.

2. An air conditioning unit adapted to be mounted adjacent the ceiling of a room including, an elongate casing having an air inlet at its upper end which inlet extends substantially throughout the longitudinal width thereof, a curved grille covering said inlet, an air outlet extending substantially throughout the width of the casing at its lower end, air-current impellers disposed within the casing adjacent the inlet for circulating air downwardly through the casing, a' cooling unit mounted within the casing and having transverse coils and also having upright fins mounted on said coils, said fins having their bottom edges inclined in a direction to cause droplets of water to gravitate out of the path of the air currents, supporting elements secured to the casing'on each side of the outlet and extending outwardly from said casing, and an elongate mixing member adjustably mounted be-' tween the supporting elements and extending throughout the length of the outlet, said member being spaced from and co-acting with said outlet for admixing room air currents with the conditioned air currents discharged through said outlet.

3. An air conditioning unit adapted to be mounted adjacent the ceiling of a room includ-" ing, an elongate casing having an air inlet at its upper end which inlet extends substantially throughout the longitudinal width thereof, a curved grille covering said inlet, an air outlet extending substantially throughout the width of the casing at its lower end, air-current impellers disposed within the casing adjacent the inlet for circulating air downwardly through the casing, a cooling and dehumidifying unit within the casing between the inlet and the outlet and in the path of the air currents, supporting elements secured to the casing on each side of the outlet and extending outwardly from said casing, and an elongate mixing member adjustably mounted between the supporting elements and extending throughout the length of the outlet, said member being spaced from and coacting with said outlet for admixing room air currents with the conditioned air currents discharged through said outlet.

4. An air conditioning unit including, an elongate casing having an air inlet at its upper end which inlet extends substantially throughout the longitudinal width thereof, a grille covering said inlet, an air outlet extending substantially throughout the width of the casing at its lower end, air-current impellers disposed within the casing adjacent the inlet for circulating air downwardly through the casing, and a cooling unit mounted within the casing and having transverse coils and also having upright fins mounted on said coils, said fins having their bottom edges inclined in a direction to cause droplets of water to gravitate out of the path of the air currents.

5. An air conditioning unit including, an elongate casing having an air inlet at its upper end which inlet extends substantially throughout the longitudinal width thereof, a grille covering said A inlet, an air outlet extending substantially throughout the width of the casing at its lower end, air-current impellers disposed within the casing adjacent the inlet for circulating air downwardly through the casing, a cooling unit mounted within the casing and having transverse coils and also having upright fins mounted on said coils, said fins having their bottom edges inclined in a direction to cause droplets of water 4 amazes inlet and the outlet and in the path or the air currents, supporting elements secured to the casing on each side or the outlet and extending outwardly from said casing, and an elongate mixing member adjustably mounted between the supporting elements and extending throughwt the length or the outlet,' said member being spaced from and coacting with said outlet for admixingroomaircurrentswiththeoonditioned 10 air currents discharged through said outlet.

GEORGE H. GRIINWAY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2418266 *Aug 16, 1943Apr 1, 1947Anemostat CorpAir mixing and diffusing outlet having a concentric open ended tube for mixing room air with the incoming ventilating air stream
US2420123 *Aug 21, 1943May 6, 1947Cooper Melbourne JHeat circulating device
US2422560 *Aug 19, 1944Jun 17, 1947B F Sturtevant CoCold air and recirculated air mixing and distributing means in an overhead air conditioning duct system
US2656780 *Mar 15, 1948Oct 27, 1953Modine Mfg CoConvection heater
US2673073 *Aug 3, 1950Mar 23, 1954Wycliffe Spooner WilliamHeat interchange
US2694971 *Sep 11, 1950Nov 23, 1954Andrews John SAir circulator
US2704971 *Jan 5, 1949Mar 29, 1955Carrier CorpDiffuser arrangment for selfcontained air conditioning unit
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US3763761 *Apr 27, 1972Oct 9, 1973Rohr Industries IncVehicle heating and cooling mechanism
US3833057 *Jun 14, 1972Sep 3, 1974R DohertyInduced air cooling and heating system
US3943329 *May 17, 1974Mar 9, 1976Clairol IncorporatedHair dryer with safety guard air outlet nozzle
US4047776 *Dec 24, 1975Sep 13, 1977Carrier CorporationCabinet construction
US4522255 *Aug 5, 1982Jun 11, 1985Baker Gary CIn a building structure
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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/285, 165/109.1, 62/427, D23/351, 392/363, 454/264, 165/123, 62/418, 454/269, 62/317, 62/263
International ClassificationF24F1/01, F24F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24F2001/0048, F24F2001/0037, F24F1/0007, F24F1/01
European ClassificationF24F1/00C, F24F1/01