Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2275461 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1942
Filing dateJun 29, 1940
Priority dateJun 29, 1940
Publication numberUS 2275461 A, US 2275461A, US-A-2275461, US2275461 A, US2275461A
InventorsAlbert Palmer
Original AssigneeAlbert Palmer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mop wringer
US 2275461 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. PALMER MOP WRINGER March 10, 1942.

Filed June 29, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet l A /ber7 Pa/m er A. PALMER MOP WRINGER March 10, 1942.

Filed June 29, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 A/berf Pal/ me? WINES;

Patented Mar. 10, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Mor WRINGER Albert Palmer, Alburg, Vt.

Application June 29, 1940, Serial No. 343,295

10 Claims.

The invention relates to improvements in mop wringers of the general type shown in my U. S. Patent No. 2,166,965 of July 25, 1939, the principal object of the present invention being to provide a generally improved construction which may be more advantageously manufactured and will pro duce better results.

In carrying out the above end, further objects are to provide simplified means for moving the side walls of the mop squeezing receptacle inwardly when said receptacle is depressed; to provide for adjustment of the receptacle side wall movement according to the size of the mop to be wrung; to provide the receptacle with an improved bottom structure which aids materially in wringing the mop; to provide an improved form of carriage for the vertical arms which carry the mop wringing receptacle and are connected with the side walls thereof; to provide novel yieldable connections between the aforesaid arms and a vertically slidable carriage with which they are connected; to provide a tie bar for the carriage-guiding tracks acting also as a stop for upward movement of the carriage; to make novel provision for connecting the wringer to a bucket, and to provide a novel construction which facilitates carrying both the wringer and the connected bucket with one hand.

With the foregoing in view, the invention resides in the novel subject matter hereinafter described and claimed, description being accomplished by reference to the accompanying drawings.

Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing the wringer.

Fig. 2 is a central vertical sectional View showing the wringer connected with a bucket.

Fig. 3 is a detail sectional View showing the manner in which the pivoted bottom section of thereceptacle may be swung upwardly to provide an opening through which the fingers of one hand may be inserted when carrying the wringer and bucket.

Fig. 4 is a detail perspective view showing the metal blank from which the arm-carrying carriage is formed. v

A preferred construction has been illustrated and will be rather specifically described, with the understanding, however, that within the scope of the invention as claimed, variations may be made.

The frame structure of the wringer includes a horizontal rectangular top frame 5 to rest upon the rim of a bucket B, one end of said frame being provided with a longitudinally curved bar I to book under the usual bead 8 at the bucket rim.

the bucket and disconnectable therefrom. The

bar I is adjustable according to the size of the bucket to be used, and in the present disclosure, the ends of this bar are turned upwardly at Ill and adjustably connected with the side bars of the frame 5 by bolt and slot connections IL.

The frame structure of the wringer also includes a substantially U-shaped frame 12 having the upper portions l3 of its side armsofiset outwardly from the lower portions M of said arms, and suitably secured at [5 to the side bars of the frame 5, the two frames being relatively braced by suitable braces IS. The arm portions l4 constitute parallel vertical tracks upon which a carriage I1 is slidable. This carriage, in the present showing, is formed from the metal blank shown at l8 in Fig. 4, this blank or plate being horizontally elongated and having openings l9 in its ends through which the tracks Hi pass. On lines spaced inwardly from its ends, the plate I8 is transversely slit inwardly from its edges as denoted at 20, permitting the major portions of the longitudinal edges of said plate to be bent upwardly, providing vertical flanges 2i. Pairs of vertical arms 22 and 22 have their lower ends disposed at opposite sides of the flanges 2|, and bolts 23 pass through said ends of said arms and through said flanges. Washers 24 of rubber or other elastic material are mounted on the bolts 23 between the arms and the flanges and prevent rattling of the connections between said arms and. the carriage l1, said Washers yielding somewhat as the arms 22 and the arms 22 swing inwardly or outwardly. When the device is to be adjusted for large mops, more Washers 24 may be added, and for small mops, some of the washers may be taken out.

The mop-wringing receptacle 25 includes two side walls 26 and 26 which are preferably perforated, wall 26 being secured to the upper ends of the arms 22 and wall 2'5 being secured to the arms 22 The receptacle also preferably includes overlapping wings 21 and 2'! on the ends of the walls 26 and 26 respectively. The lower edge of wall 26 is provided with a fixed bottom section 28 for the receptacle 25, and the wall 26 carries an upwardly swingable bottom section 28, this section being hinged at 29 so that it may swing vertically. The bottom section 28 is so inclined that when the receptacle 25 is contracted (walls 26 and 26* move toward each other as in connected with the Wall 26.

dotted lines in Fig. '2), it will upwardly swing the section 28 with respect to the side walls 26 and 26*, thus upwardly squeezing the mop for better wringing while said walls are inwardly squeezing the same. Obviously 28'= simply slides upon 28 as the receptacle is contracted. The pivotal mounting of the section 28 also permits this section to be upwardly swung against the wall 26*- as shown in Fig. 3, providing an opening through whichthe fingers of one hand may be downwardly inserted to hook them under the wall 26 for carrying the wringer and the connected bucket.

Two links 30 are directly pivoted at their upper ends to the side wall 26, said links being preferably rigid with the ends of a rock shaft 31 mounted in bearings 32 carried by said wall. The

lower ends of these links are directly pivoted at 33 to the side bars of the frame 5, said side bars preferably having upstanding lugs 34 with which the pivots 33 are engaged. The pivoted lower ends of the links 353 are provided with downwardly projecting arms 35 to which coiled, tension springs 36 are connected, said springs being anchored at 31 to the upper ends of the side arms of the frame l2.

Two additional inclined links 3i] are associated with the side wall 26 their upper ends being pivotally connected with said wall at 3W, preferably in the same manner as the links 30 are At the lower ends of these links 3!)", the side bars of the frame 5 are provided with brackets 31 having curved portions 38 formed with openings 33 through which said lower ends of the links pass loosely. Coiled compression springs 40 surround these links and at their lower ends abut the convex surfaces of the curved bracket portions 38. The upper ends of these springs abut nuts or other suitable stops 4! adjustable along the upper portions of the links 30*. The lower ends of these links are provided with other stops ll.v adjustable along said links and abutting the lower sides of the bracket portions 38. The stops .42 may well be in the form of cotter pins or the like insertable through any of a plurality of openings 43 in the links 38*. It will be seen that by adjusting the stops 4! and 42 longitudinally of the links 33 the receptacle side wall 26 may be adjusted toward or from the wall 26, changing the effective size of the receptacle according to the size of the mop with which the wringer is to be used.

At 43 I have shown an upward extension on the receptacle wall 23 which aids in guiding the mop into the receptacle, and at M an inclined plate has been illustrated to guide the mop into the bucket 6 when it is to be immersed in the wash water. The upper end of plate 44 is suitablysecured to an arched bar 45 extending transversely of and secured to one end of the frame 5. When the latch 9 is of the construction shown (one piece'of spring metal), bar 45 may also aid in connecting this latch with the frame.

Due to the pull of the springs 35, the parts normally stand as shown in Fig. 1 and in full lines in Fig. 2, the upward movementof the carriage I! being then limited by a tie bards which extends between and .is secured to the upper portions of the tracks It. When a mop head is inserted in the receptacle 2-5 and the mop handle pushed downwardly, the receptacle, the arms 22 and 22 and thecarriage Hall move downwardly. During this downward movement, thelinksflfl and 30are caused; to swing inwardly and downwardly as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2 thus forcing the receptacle side walls 26 and 26* inwardly toward each other to press and squeeze the mop. During the inward movement of these side walls, the bottom section 28 slides inwardly and upwardly upon the fixed section 28, further squeezing the mop at the lower end. When the device and connected bucket are to be carried from one point to another, it is an easy matter to upwardly swing the bottom section 28 as shown in Fig. 3, permitting easy use of one hand to grasp the lower end of the side wall 26*. When adjustments are required for larger or smaller mops, this may be readily accomplished by adjusting the stops H and 42 associated with the links 30%, and by adding or subtracting washers 24 associated with the carriage I7. Moreover, these washers 24 prevent loose rattling of parts and will of course yield as the arms 22 and 22 swing inwardly and outwardly.

On account of the excellent results. obtainable from the details disclosed, they are preferably followed. However, within the scope of the invention as claimed, variations may be made. For example, instead of using the elastic washers 24, coil springs or other suitable springs could be used, being mere mechanical equivalents. It will also be understood that the arms 22 and 22 may be made from spring steel if desired to yield when a large mop is being wrung.

' I claim:

1. In a mop-actuated mop wringer having a frame, and a depressible mop-wringing receptacle mounted on said frame to be depressed by a downward push on a mop in said receptacle, said receptacle having inwardly movable side walls; an inclined link pivoted at its upper end to one of said side walls, a. pivotal connection from the lower end of said one link directly to said frame, a second inclined link pivoted at its upper end to the other of said side walls, and a second pivotal connection from the lower end of said second link directly to said frame, the two links being disconnected from each other and free to move inwardly and outwardly at all points above the lower pivotal connections. Y

2. In a mop wringer having a frame, a depressible mop-wringing receptacle mounted on said frame and having inwardly movable side walls,

I and means for moving one of said side walls inwardly when said receptacle is depressed; an inclined link for moving the other of said side walls inwardly when said receptacle is depressed, said link being pivoted at its upper end to said other of said side walls, said frame being provided with a bracket having a convexly curved portion formed with an opening through which the lower end of said link passes loosely, a coiled compression spring surrounding. said link, the lower end of said spring being disposed against the convexly curved side of said bracket, a stop for the upper end of said spring adjustable along said link, and a second stop adjustable along said lower end of said link and abutting the lower side of said curved bracket portion, whereby adjustment of said stops will adjust said link to adjust said other of said side walls toward orfrom said one of said side walls.

3. In a mop wringer having a frame, a depressible mop wringing receptacle mounted on said frame and having inwardly movable side walls, and means for moving said side walls inwardly when the receptacle is depressed; an upwardly movable bottom member for said receptacle pivoted to one of :saidside walls, and means on the I other of said side walls for automatically moving said bottom member upwardly with respect to said side walls when the latter move inwardly.

4. In a mop wringer having a frame, a depressible mop wringing receptacle mounted on said frame and having inwardly movable side walls, and means for moving said side Walls inwardly when the receptacle is depressed; one bottom section for said receptacle secured to one of said side walls, and a second bottom section pivoted to the other of said side walls to swing upwardly, said second section resting slidably upon said one section, said one section being inclined to swing said second section upwardly when the side walls move inwardly.

5. In a mop wringer having a frame, a depressible mop wringing receptacle mounted on said frame and having inwardly movable side walls, and means for moving said side walls inwardly when the receptacle is depressed; means for securing said frame to a bucket, one bottom section connected to one of said side walls, and an upwardly swingable bottom section pivoted to the other of said side walls and resting normally upon said one bottom section, upward swinging of said swingable bottom section providing an opening through which the fingers of one hand may be inserted to hook them under said other of said side walls to carry the wringer and the bucket.

6. In a mop wringer having a frame provided with parallel vertical tracks, a depressible mop squeezing receptacle having inwardly movable side walls, and vertical arms to the upper ends of which said side Walls are secured; a carriage for said arms consisting of a horizontally elongated plate having openings in its ends receiving said tracks, the longitudinal edge portions of said plate being bent vertically and providing flanges, and a bolt passing through said flanges and through the lower ends of said arms to connect the arms with the carriage.

7. In a mop wringer having a frame provided with parallel vertical tracks, adepressible mop squeezing receptacle having inwardly movable side walls, vertical arms to the upper ends of which said side walls are secured, and a carriage between the lower ends of said arms and slidably engaged with said tracks; a bolt passing through said arms and said carriage, and elastic washers on said bolt between said arms and said carriag'e, said washers preventing rattling and being yieldable as said arms swing with respect to said carriage.

8. In a mop wringer having a frame provided with parallel vertical tracks, a depressible mop squeezing receptacle having inwardly movable side walls, vertical arms to the upper ends of which said side walls are secured, a carriage slidable along said tracks and connected with the lower ends of said arms, and spring means for raising said carriage, arms and receptacle after each depression thereof; a horizontal bar extending between and secured to said tracks above said carriage, said bar being disposed at the upper limit of the carriage movement to act both as a tie bar for said tracks and a stop for the upward movement of said carriage.

9. In a mop wringer having a horizontally elongated frame to rest upon and project in opposite directions beyond the usual external bead at the rim of a bucket; a fixed longitudinally curved bar extending transversely under one end of said frame to book under said bead and occupy a position at the exterior of the bucket, the ends of said bar being turned upwardly, means securing said upturned bar ends to said frame, and a latch mounted on the other end of said frame to also hook under said bead and occupy a position at the exterior of. the bucket.

10. A structure as specified in claim 9; said means securing said upturned ends of said curved bar to said frame including means for adjusting said bar toward and from said latch according to the size of the bucket.

ALBERT PALMER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2417416 *Oct 23, 1945Mar 18, 1947Hutchins George VMop wringer
US2569786 *Mar 13, 1947Oct 2, 1951Stapf Joseph EPivoted jaw mop wringer
US2603271 *Oct 12, 1950Jul 15, 1952 Sheets
US2610348 *Feb 26, 1948Sep 16, 1952David JenkinsDivergent plate, link supported, mop pressure actuated mop wringer
US2651073 *Sep 25, 1947Sep 8, 1953Colson CorpMop wringer
US5608942 *Jun 3, 1994Mar 11, 1997Disbrow; RichardFor mounting on a rim of a basin or toilet bowl
US5720073 *Feb 28, 1996Feb 24, 1998Yugengaisha AccessMop thread-squeezing apparatus
US8082620May 15, 2007Dec 27, 2011Rubbermaid Commercial Products LlcMop bucket and wringer
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/261
International ClassificationA47L13/10, A47L13/59
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/59
European ClassificationA47L13/59