Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2277043 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1942
Filing dateJul 20, 1940
Priority dateJul 20, 1940
Publication numberUS 2277043 A, US 2277043A, US-A-2277043, US2277043 A, US2277043A
InventorsLee Cohn
Original AssigneeL J Miller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Infant's diaper substitute
US 2277043 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 24, 1942. L. COHN INFANTS DIAPER SUBSTITUTE Filed July 20, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 iii-- IINVENTOR. LEE CoH/v ATTORNEY March 24, 1942.

L. COHN INFANTS DIAPER SUBSTITUTE Filed July 20, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. L 55 COHN BY 4 I 3 7 ATTORNEY March 24, 1942. COHN INFANTS DIAPER SUBSTITUTE Filed July 20, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. LEE COI-IIN BY 7 A TTORNEY Patented ar. 24, 1942 STATES NT, QFFICE Lce Cohn, San Francisc nine Calif.

per cent to L. 3.. Miller, San Francisco,

Application July 20,1940, Serial No. 346,580

12 Claims. (!.128-284'i The present invention relates to sanitary devices, and particularly to a substitute for diapers for babies.

Babies and small infants who have not yet i learned to control the passage of urine and movement of the bowels require some convenient sort of device to protect the bed linen and clothing. The conventional answer to the problem is the diaper, a cloth folded to fit the child comfortably, and of a semiabsorbent nature, so that it will hold the secretions until such time as it can be replaced by a fresh one.

Such diapers require frequent changing and very careful washing and sterilizing before being used again. The labor involved in caring for them is a heavy burden on those charged with the care of the child.

In hospitals or other establishments where large numbers of babies are cared'for together, the diapers require exceptionally thorough treatment to prevent the spread of various types of such as rubber, reinforced at necessary or condisease from one baby to another and from the outside. The problems of the household are multiplied when infants are cared for in institutions. A

The labor and inconvenience in the handling of diapers has lead to numerous attempts to devise a satisfactory substitute. Some recent eiiorts have been aimed at the employment of treated cellulose sheets which would be used but 1 been able to overcome the dimculty of maintaining the properalinement of the receptacle portions with the secreting organs-without uncomfortably constraining the baby. Further, the structures have been such that the cleansing of them has been provocative of more trouble than the conventional diapers. Again the harness or supporting strap system of such devices has been I complicated, objectionable and unduly restric tive.

Various other substitutes have been devised which are known to those familiar with the art, but all of them have been open to objections so serious as to prevent their wide-spread adoption.

The present invention comprises a yielding container made to receive the urine and fecal discharges and to hold them away from contact with the skin, particularly with reference to urine. The arrangement does not require, however, any elaborate'precautions to aline the receiving portions with the respective discharge organs of the baby, nor can they be easily twisted or pulled into such position that'the container will have its function impaired. It is preferable to make the device of a soft, impervious material venient places to maintain the desired shape,

and arranged to retain the discharged material without restricting the baby.

The details of the invention may be understood more fully by reference to the drawings 7 structure taken as indicated by line 5-5 in Fig. 3;

shown in Fig.

Fig. 6 is a side view, partially in section, of

the embodiment of Fig. 2;

7 is a top view of the device shown in Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating a preferred shape of rim, taken as indicated by arrows 88 in Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view of a modified shape of rim;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view of another rim structure.

From inspection of the drawings and from the description which follows, it will be seen that the primary object of the invention is to provide a satisfactory substitute 'for. a baby's diaper.

Some of the other objects are: to provide a receptacle for holding temporarily theurine and stool discharged by a baby; to provide a substitute for diapers which can be readily cleansed and disinfected; to reduce possibility of spreading infectious diseases throughdiaper contact; to prevent soiling of clothes and bed linen by involuntary discharges of urine and fecal matter; to provide a sanitary device which may be used by persons of any age who are afflicted with incontinence or lack of control of the bladder and bowels; to provide a sanitary substitute for a bed pan for those persons who are unable to make use of the conventional types; to provide an easily portable container for stools and urine which may be attached without discomfort to the user; to provide a diaper substitute which requires no elaborate harnesses for its support; to provide a diaper substitute which may be rials having great resistance to corrosive secretions; to provide a diaper substitute which re.-

- tains discharged matter out of contact with the the rear a preferred form of a device in position in Fig. 1, comprising a unitary rubber container I shaped to fit around the external urinary and fecal organs of the baby or-other, user, and to beheld in position by means such as a resilient belt '2 fastened'around the waist of the wearer l and attached to the container I by suitable clasps l at front and rear. The embodiment shown anteriorly in Fig. 2 will be explained lateri'in connection with Figs. 6 and'l.

\ Container I depends from a rim 8, molded of relatively heavy rubber or similar material shaped to fit snugly over the lower portion of Inner pouch I8 is pierced by a comparatively small number of'relatively large perforations IO. ,Through them' the liquid entering the inner pouch I is rapidly passed on to outer'pouch II,

which is urinary compartment B. The outer' pouch is also secured to, or formed integrally readily manufactured of easily procurable matewith, the rim 6, and is elongated both front and f rear therebeyond. The'purpose of such elongation is tomake sure that-regardless of theposition in which the baby is lying, a part of pouch II will lie below the trough 9 and pouch I5, thus ensuring a gravity drainage into the storage. or outer, pouch II. It will be seen that elongating the pouch II beyond a vertical line through the uppermost portions of rim 8 accomplishes this result. If the child is lying prone, the forward portion I! of the pouch" will be lower than trough 8; if supine, the rear portion 20' of the pouch II will lie beneath the trough;

while if upright, the entire pouch is in receptive position;

The provision of fewer apertures I6 between I5 andIl, and wider spacingthan the. users abdomen in front, as shown in Fig. 2,

around the crotch and over a substantial por- 'tion of the buttocks, as shown in Fig. 1. A

groove 1 maybe molded into rim 8, facing inwardly throughout'to provide a firm but yielding contact with the body of the user. when the rim i is pressed against the skin, groove 1 becomes a low pressure vacuum cup, tending to hold the rim more tightly to the 'body.- Two shoulders 8 lying on each side of the groove 1- are thus in position to act as sealing members.

From the rim 8 hangs an inner trough 9 of firm rubber or similar material having a large number of smallperforations Ill. These perforations may be distributed over the entire area. A diaphragm II may be set across the trough or pouch 9 somewhat forward of its median portion, dividing the pouch into a front or urine-receiving portion I2 and a rear faeces cradle portion I4. It is not essential that the device be used in such position that all the urine is deflected away from immediate contact with the faeces by the diaphragm I I. Hence the diaphragm II may be eliminated if desired. The numerous perforations I0 allow all of the liquid discharge to drain out of the trough 9 into urinary compartment A and thence into compartment B, while retaining the faeces in cradle I4.

The trough or pouch 9 may be formed integrally with the rim 6, or may be joined thereto by any method which will produce a liquid-tight connection, Adjacent the line of attachment between trough or pouch 9. and rim 6, the latter is joined by similar means to an inner pouch I5, which completely surrounds the trough or pouch 9, andreceives the liquid seepage therefrom.

Thus urinary compartment A is formed.

in the case of the trough and feces-cradle,.aeta -to confine the liquid matter to the outer compartment II. If compartment I'I 'becomes'over- 1? f there couldoccur a reverse flow in some positions, but suflicient capacity is provided so that under normal conditions there will be no return Likewise, it is contemplatedthat the device may be provided witlrsmall check valves placed "in the perforations I6 whiohprevent return flow.

under anyfi i A portion of pouch I1 is' re f threaded to forms. drain 2| for the removal of the liquid wastes and to permit ready .cleansing. -In use, drain 2| may be closed by a screw plug 22.

Additional reinforcements may be provided'to maintain the proper shape of the container, such as a rib 24 molded around the median line of -pouchJI. The feces cradle 9 may also be'reinent devicewotild eliminate the urine compartforced at the rear by ribs, not shown, or by using I a slightly stiffer material section to prevent the material from clinging too closely to the buttock area.

A simpler and less expensive form zof the prestachmentmay be provided.

From the description above it will be seen that a wide latitude is possible in the positioning of the device, since even if it is not in its normal location, the rim and the laterally enlarged front and rear portions will be in sealing position and capable of receiving alldischarges from the infant without danger of. spillage.

It will be observed that the device, by changing its dimensions, is equally suited to use by adults who require sanitary protection.

Referring now to the embodiment of Figs. '2, 6 and '7, there is illustrated an .embodiment which permits a smaller device to be used in cases where it is possible to support a holding con tainer by attaching it to a leg, for example, or

. bag.

Where portability is not desired and any kind of holding or disposal facility is available.

In this embodiment, a similar structure is used for the frame 8 and the pouch 9. Inner pouch 3B is made somewhat larger than in the previous embodiment and it may be desirable to form a larger number of drainage apertures 3| therethrough. These drainage apertures 3| may likewise be provided with small check valves to prevent possibility of return flow. Outer conduit 32 is formed along the median line of pouch 3B, and provides no storage space, but merely acts as a collecting conduit, leading the accumulated liquid wastes into front and rear discharge conduits 34 and 35 respectively. The conduits 34 and 35, which may be conventional rubber tubing, may be joined at will with a common conduit 35, in turn leading to a rubber bag 31 or other discharge container. If desirable, the bag 37 may be attached to the leg of the individual by straps 38 and a check valve 39 is provided to prevent the bag from being emptied back into the tube 36, while permitting gases to escape from the Such valves are known to the art, and a detailed description will not be given, since it forms no part of the instant invention. Obviously, a single conduit from the outer pouch 32 might be used, but I prefer to have both front and rear outlets to insure rapid drainage in either the prone, supine or erect positions.

In some devices it may be advantageous to use a sponge rubber construction for the rim 6, but

' any suitable material may be used. The shape of the rim may be varied also. Fig. 9 shows a rim having a single rounded rib 80 instead of the grooved type shown in Fig. 8. I have also found a wedge-shaped or triangularly beaded rim ll, as shown in Fig; 10, to be. satisfactory. Particularly in those cases where a softer material is used for the rim, a coredZ of wire or other material may be molded in to hold the desired contour of the rim and shape it to the body of the user.

The upper compartment or trough 9 may be provided with a highly absorbent material such as cellulose for containing the greater mass of urine and fecal discharges. The form is preferably a disposable pad shaped to fit the entire compartment or if the diagram H is employed then'the disposable pads would be shaped to fit the individual compartments. The urine containers such as A and B would provide capacity for the extra urine not capable of being absorbed by the pad.

The pads of absorbent material may be treatedwith an antiseptic or deodorant, such as boric acid (powder), and can be manufactured'for economical use. With the use of such pads, some convenience may be added for employment of the requires a minimum of harnesses to support it.

and thus prevents one of the causes of chafing and irritation.

It is useful not only for babies, but also for those older children or adults who are unable to exercise control over their eliminative functions or who are confined to bed and find it difiicult to use the ordinary sanitary devices.

The use of my device relieves the mother or at-- upon which he may have supposedly selected the \words of this disclosure nor possible for any human to anticipate what direction the future development of the art may take, which may make the language used inapt. Therefore, the disclosure of this invention should not be construed as limited by the words used and, further, the substance should not be confined to the precise forms in the drawings illustrating this invention. It is contemplated that changes of form may be made, with variations and departures from the illustrated forms, without departing from the scope of this invention. Such variations and departures include those made possible by discovery of improved materials and better uses and forms of present materials, as well as practices and results which may be possible in actual commercial fabrication and handling.

I claim:

1 A diaper'substitute, comprising dischargercceiving means arranged to enclose the urinary and fecal organs, means for maintaining and discharge-receiving means in sealing relation about said organs, drainage means formed through said receiving means, an inner enclosure surrounding said receiving nieans, substantially undirectional drainage means associated with said inner enclosure, an outer enclosure surrounding said inner enclosure, an outlet formed in said outer enclosure, and means for closing said outlet.

2. A diaper substitute, comprising discharge-- receiving means arranged sealingly to enclose the urinary and fecal organs, means permitting drainage of liquids from said discharge-receiving means, means for effecting a primary separation of urine and feces in said discharge-receiving means, an enclosure surrounding said dischargereceiving means, spaced drainage apertures formed through said enclosure, an outer enclosure surrounding said enclosure, a drainage port formed in said outer enclosure, and means for closing said port while said diaper substitute is in use.

3. A diaper substitute, comprising a. perforated trough shaped to enclose the urinary and fecal organs, a diaphragm extending laterally across said trough, a plurality of drainage apertures distributed throughout said trough, an inner enclosure surrounding said trough, drainage apertures distributed in said enclosure, an outer enclosure surrounding said inner enclosure, a

drainage port formed in said outer enclosure, and

the liquid secretions from contact with the skin,

means for closing said port while said diaper substitute is in service.

4. A diaper substitute, comprising a dischargereceiving trough shaped to enclose the urinary and fecal organs of a human being, a diaphragm extending transversely across said trough a rim arranged to fit sealingly against a user formed peripherally about'said trough, a plurality of ventilating apertures formed through said rim, and a plurality of drainage apertures formed throughout said trough, an inner enclosure formed integrally with said rim and surrounding said trough, spaced drainage apertures in said inner enclosure, an outer enclosure formed integrally with said rim and surrounding said inner enclosure, a drainage port formed in said outer enclosure, and means for plugging said P 5. A diaper substitute, comprising a trough, a rim arranged to fit snugly against the skin around the urinary and fecal organs, a diaphragm extending transversely of said trough between said organs, ventilating means formed in said rim, and a plurality of drainage apertures formed in said trough, an inner enclosure formed integrally with said rim and surrounding said trough, spaced drainage apertures through said inner enclosure, an outer enclosure surrounding said inner enclosure and formed integrally with said rim, a drain formed in said outer enclosure, means for closing said drain, and means associated with said rim for supporting said diaper substitute.

6. A diaper substitute, comprising a trough, a rim arranged to fit snugly against the skin around the urinary and fecal organs, and laterally over the lower abdomen and over a portion of the buttocks of the wearer, ventilating means formed in said rim, and a plurality of spaced drainage apertures formed in said trough, an inner enclosure formed integrally with said rim and surrounding said trough, spaced drainage apertures through said inner enclosure, an outer enclosure surrounding said inner enclosure and formed integrally with said rim, a drain formed in said outer enclosure, means for closing said drain, and means associated with said rim for sup porting said diaper substitute.

'7. A diaper substitute, comprising a trough, a rim arranged to fit tightly against the skin around the urinary and fecal organs, and over the lower abdomen and a portion of the buttocks of the wearer, a diaphragm extending transversely of said trough between said organs, ventilating means formed in said rim, and aplurality of spaced drainage apertures formed in said trough, an inner enclosure formed integrally with said rim and surrounding said trough, spaced drainage apertures through said inner enclosure, an outer enclosure surrounding said inner enclosure I and formed integrally with said rim, and extend ng substantially forward and backward of the uppermost front portion and the uppermost rear portion, respectively, of said rim, a drain formed in said outer enclosure, means for closing said drain, and means associated with said rim for supporting said diaper substitute.

8. A diaper substitute, comprising a trough, a rim arranged to fit snugly against the skin around the urinary and fecal organs, and over the l wer abdomen and a portion of the buttocks of the wearer: ventilating means formed in said rim, and a p urality of spaced drainage apertures formed in said trough, an inner enclosure formed "ztegrally with said rim and surrounding said trough, space drainage apertures through said lill inner enclosure, an outer enclosure surrounding said inner enclosure and formed integrally with said rim, and extending substantially forward and backward of the uppermost front portion and the uppermost rear portion, respectively of said rim, means for maintaining said outer enclosure in fully extended position, a drain formed in said outer enclosure, means for closing said drain, and means associated with said rim for supporting said diaper substitute.

9. A diaper substitute, comprising dischargereceiving means arranged toenclose the urinary ing said inner enclosure, a front drainage aperture and a rear drainage aperture formed in said outer closure, drainage conduits leading from said frontand rear drainage apertures, and storage means associatedwith said drainage conduits. 10. A diaper substitute, comprising drainagereceiving means arranged sealingly to enclose the urinary and fecal organs, means permitting drainage of liquids from said discharge-receiving means, means for efiecting a primary separation of urine and feces in said discharge-receiving means; an enclosure surrounding said dischargereceiving means, a few widely spaced drainage apertures formed through said enclosure; an outer enclosure surrounding said enclosure, a front and a rear drainage aperture formed in said outer enclosure, conduits extending from said front and rear drainage apertures, and temporary storage means connected to said conduits.

11. A diaper substitute, comprising a perforated trough to enclose the urinary and fecal organs, a plurality of drainage apertures distributed throughout said trough; an inner enclosure surrounding said trough, a plurality of drainage apertures distributed in said enclosure, an outer collecting enclosure communicating with said inner enclosure by means of said drainage apertures, front and rear drainage tubes leading from said outer collecting enclosure, and storage means connected to said tubes.

12. A diaper substitute, comprising a discharge-receiving trough toenclose the urinary and fecal organs of a human being, a diaphragm.

exiending transversely across said trough, a rim arranged to fit sealingly against a user formed peripherally about said trough, a plurality of venti ating apertures formed near said rim, and a plurality of spaced drainage apertures formed throughout said trough, an inner enclosure formed integrally with said rim and surrounding said trough, a plurality of spaced drainage apertures formed in said inner enclosure, an outer collecting enclosure communicating with said inner enclosure by means of said drainage aper- =tures, drainage conduits associated with said -outer collecting enclosure forwardly and rearwardly thereof, and storage means associated with said drainage conduits.

LEE COHN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2472186 *Dec 8, 1943Jun 7, 1949Ewan Arnold GilbertApparatus for collecting urine from horses and other animals
US2536052 *Dec 17, 1947Jan 2, 1951Gohlke Harvey GCollection bag for urine
US2544341 *Jun 21, 1946Mar 6, 1951Mcgraw William FCollecting receptacle for urine
US2706985 *Aug 17, 1953Apr 26, 1955Daisy Frances SansouciComfort bandage
US2920625 *Aug 2, 1957Jan 12, 1960Green Paul DInfant's diaper substitute
US3182661 *Oct 5, 1962May 11, 1965Ribeiro Louis PSanitary garments for infants
US3397698 *Oct 15, 1965Aug 20, 1968Gladys B. HickeyUrinal
US3424160 *Aug 17, 1966Jan 28, 1969Dirk W KoornwinderBaby-dry-girdle
US3447536 *Feb 25, 1966Jun 3, 1969Snyder Anna D EExternal wearable urinal and rectal pouch device
US3577989 *Oct 31, 1968May 11, 1971Jean O AndersonDisposable plastic, elimination-trapping bag for incontinent patients
US3583402 *Oct 16, 1968Jun 8, 1971Donald R CordellPortable infant urinal
US3626941 *Aug 6, 1968Dec 14, 1971Donald D WebbExcretory prosthesis
US3729004 *Feb 8, 1971Apr 24, 1973G BurgerBaby{40 s napkin
US3918433 *May 22, 1974Nov 11, 1975Richard C FuiszFluid sampling device
US4114621 *Dec 7, 1976Sep 19, 1978Mims Jr Carl CCombination incontinent garment and liner
US4257418 *Jan 22, 1979Mar 24, 1981Mo Och Domsjo AktiebolagDevice for absorbing urine with incontinent persons
US4553969 *Mar 14, 1983Nov 19, 1985Taylor Frances HDisposable relief container with secural liner
US4950262 *Jul 27, 1989Aug 21, 1990Koyo Disposable Goods Co., Ltd.Excretion absorbing-and-holding device
US5413117 *Aug 5, 1994May 9, 1995Wills; MarquitaProphylactic device
US5853403 *Apr 19, 1996Dec 29, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Absorbent article with body contacting liquid control member
US6375643 *Sep 14, 1999Apr 23, 2002Kerry MoorheadUrine/fecal collection undergarment
US6458114 *Sep 1, 2000Oct 1, 2002Uni-Charm CorporationDisposable diaper
US7597689Nov 7, 2003Oct 6, 2009The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent article with improved topsheet
US7771406Apr 13, 2007Aug 10, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyArticles with elasticated topsheets
US7794440Nov 7, 2003Sep 14, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles with masking topsheet having one or more openings providing a passageway to a void space
US7905871Oct 6, 2004Mar 15, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyElasticated materials having bonding patterns used with low load force elastics and stiff carrier materials
US8343118 *Mar 16, 2006Jan 1, 2013Joseph Eugene DavisDiaper rash prevention apparatus
US8394074 *Sep 12, 2007Mar 12, 2013Universite Pierre Et Marie Curie (Paris 6)Undergarment for incontinent person and treatment device connected to an undergarment
US8414553Aug 10, 2010Apr 9, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent article with masking topsheet having one or more openings providing a passageway to a void space
US20100010459 *Sep 12, 2007Jan 14, 2010Francois PietteUndergarment for incontinent person and treatment device connected to an undergarment
US20110028926 *Oct 14, 2010Feb 3, 2011Davis Joseph EDiaper Rash Prevention Apparatus
US20110137273 *Aug 8, 2008Jun 9, 2011Coloplast A/SFecal management system
WO1998004223A1 *Jul 22, 1997Feb 5, 1998Procter & GambleDiaper having adjustable absorbent assemblies
WO2007109424A2 *Mar 7, 2007Sep 27, 2007Joseph E DavisDiaper rash prevention apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/348
International ClassificationA61F5/451
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/451
European ClassificationA61F5/451