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Publication numberUS2278387 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 31, 1942
Filing dateJul 2, 1938
Priority dateJul 2, 1938
Publication numberUS 2278387 A, US 2278387A, US-A-2278387, US2278387 A, US2278387A
InventorsWickwire Jr Arthur M
Original AssigneeInterchem Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for inking printing cylinders
US 2278387 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR INKING'PRITING CYLINDERS Fned July 2', 1938 5 sheets-sheet 1 ATTORNEY March 31, 1942.

A. M. wlcKwlRE, JR 2,278,387

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR INKING PRINTING CYLINDERS Filed July 2, 1938 5-SheebS-Sheel'. 2

ATTORNEY A. M.,`w. wlR'E, JR

Mrch 31, 1.9142.

METHOD AND APPARATUS For .NKING `PRINTING CYLINDERS Filed 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 gf ATTORNEY are 3l 9 2 A. M. wlcKwlRE, JR 2,278,387

METHOD AND.APPARATUS FOR INKING PRINTING CYLINDERS Filed July ,2, 1938 5 sheets-sheet 4 Mlllllllllllll Illll MIM;

Wil*

. ATTORNEY March 31, WICKWIARE,

METHQD AND 'PPARATUS FOR/ INKIMPRINTING GYLINDERS..

IFiled July l2,1938 5 sheets-sheet s llllll. ILlll Illlllllllllllll Il ATTORNEY Patented Mei. 31, 1942 METnoD AND APPARATUS Fon INKING PRINTING CYLINDERS Arthur M.wiekwire, Ji., Mountain Lakes, N. J.,

` assignor, by mesne assignments, to Intel-chemical Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation e of Ohio Application .my 2, 193s, serial No. 217,139 l A 17 claims. (ci. `10i-15's)V 'Ihis inventionrelates to, high speed intaglioA or gravure printing and aims to provide an improved metho'd and apparatus for applying ink or other marking material to the surface f an intaglio printing cylinder.

In printing, and particularly intaglio or gra- 'vure printing, if a plurality of colors are to be applied to the paper, each color must Vbe dried before the succeeding color is applied. If a con-` tinuous web is being printing, it becomes necessary Vto provide a considerable length of web between each unit in order that each color may be thoroughly dry before a subsequent color is applied. Furthermore, attempts are constantly being made to'increase the speedY of the printing operation. To attain both a shorter web lengthl and increased speed and still realize the full possibilities of rotogravure printing as to quality, very volatile inks-must be used, and such inks must be brought to the priningV line without undue loss o f solvents.

Many factors `must be considered in' connection with this problem. 'Ihe rate of evaporation of solvents is directly proportional to the area exposed to the air. Likewise, it is dependent upon the condition of the air, that is, whether the air di'y in the bottom of the cells and tend to make them smaller. This, of course, has a detrimental effect on the quality of the imprint.

J In order to oyercome these difficulties, it has been suggested that the entire ink fountain be enclosed. This has been accomplished by providing a substantially airtight housing in which is receptive-to solvents or not. The effect 'of evaporation on the surface of a quantity of ink in terms of percentage of solvent loss may be said to depend upori the relation of the area ex posed and the total volume of ink affected by the evaporation. Thus, a. bathof ink of substantial quantity in relation to the surfaceY area exposed to the air would not be greatly affected by evaporation from the surface because the percentage 'of solvent 10% would be small. When, however,

the spread i'n a thin-film over the surface render the ink unsuited for transfer to the paper;

The reasons for this arev that evaporation of solvent actually diminishes the .volume of in the cell and makes it more diicult for the paper to pick it up. Moreover, since evaporation takes place at the surface where. it comes in contact with the paper, the viscosity and other propere Vties of the ink are altered. In addition to this,

the Ypaper usually does'not remove all the ink from the cells, and if evaporation occurs after the printing operation and before the engraving is again flooded with ink, thevink will eventually -of a printing member, such as an engraved the major portion of the printing cylinder is mounted, and only a portion of the cylindrical surface in the region of the impression line is exposed. While this arrangement has permitted the use of volatile inks, it has not been entirely satisfactory in all respects. Such constructions are usually cumbersome and expensive; and it is difficult to remove the printing cylinder when it is desired to change engravings. Moreover, if different colored ink is to be used in a subsequent run', the entire housing must be thoroughly cleaned before operations can' again be started;

I have discovered that the above `mentioned and other difficulties may be obviated, and very volatile inks or other marking materials may be i used and printing of excellent quality obtained,

without enclosing the major portionof the printing cylinder and the ink fountain in a substantially airtight housing'.

In accordance with myvinvention, ink is applied to the surface of the printing cylinder in the form of a thin and regulated film or layer so as to provide a uniform protective coating over the surface of the cylinder and the cells of the engraving, which coating is of sulicient thick- 'ness that the consistency of the ink is not appreciably altered by normal loss of solvent there-'- from, but which is alsov so controlled'in amount that said ink WiII not fall or be otherwise removed from the surface of the cylinder b'y the normal rotation thereof. Ireferably, this layer of'ink is'applied to the surface of the printing cylinder closely following the printing line. vSuch a method of 'applying ink to a printing cylinder may be effectively and advantageously combined with the methods of preventing evaporation disclosed in Irving Gurwick United States Patent No. 2,272,406, dated February l0, 1942.

One form of apparatus -embodying my invenl` tion may comprise Ia substantially trough shaped -inkapplying member which is substantially coextensive with the length of the printing cylinder, and is provided with a lower lip or regulating 4device which is adapted to perform the dual function of forcing the ink into the cells of the engraving and regulating the thickness of the lm or layer of ink applied. 'I'his applicator is preferably' pivotally mounted on a pair of arms,

which in turn are pivoted to a movable frame or carriage so that the applicator may be adjusted and properly positioned for printing cylinders of different sizes.. The carriage also supports suitable pans -and shields for receiving excess ink removed from the printing cylinder and return-Y ing it to a removable reservoir which is `conven` iently located beneath the press.` A pump associated with this reservoir supplies the ink or These and other features and objects of my y invention will become apparent upon consideration of the following description of specific embodiments thereof and by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig.v 1 is a side elevational view of one unit of a multi-color printing press in which the ink applicator and itsv associated mechanism have been included and are shown in inoperative position; l

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary front elevational view, partly in section, ofthe apparatus, and showing the ink applicator and its associated mechanism in operative position;l

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of-the apparatus showing the arrangement of the ink applicator with respect to the printing and impression cylinders;

Fig. 4 is a detail view, partly in section, of a portion of the supporting structure;

Fig. 5.is a vertical sectional view taken substantially along the line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a sectional detail view of the applicator, and showing the end seal arrangement;

Fig. 7 is a sectional detail view of the applica. tor operatively positioned with respect to the printing cylinder;

Fig. 8 is an elevational view of the face of the applicator, showing the position of the end seals and the supply conduits;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary plan view, partly in section, showing the details of the supporting structure;

Fig. 10 is an elevational view, similar to Fig. 8 of a modied form of ink applicator embodying my invention;

` Fig. 11 is a fragmentary side elevational view 'of the applicator shown in Fig. 10; and

Fig. 12 is a vertical sectional View, similar to Fig. '7, of the modified form of applicator.

I have shown my invention applied to an intaglio printing machine of the general type disclosed in the above referred to patent of Irving Gurwick. It will be understood however that, in its broader aspects, the invention is not restricted in its use to such a machine, but may be used in printing machines generally, and par- 28 lwhich extends outwardly and downwardly toward the horizontal portion 25 of the upper frame, and forms a support for any parts, such as breaker rolls and the like, which are mounted above the said horizontal portion. A toothed segment is mounted on eachside of the top structure adjacent the pivots 2-1 and cooperates with pinions 3l provided on a shaft 32 having a squared or keyed end so that it may be rotated to move the top structure to an upper or open position away from the horizontal portion 25, all as is disclosed in my copending application, Serial No. 343,914, flled,July 5, 1940.

An engraved roller or printing cylinder 33, having a shaft 34, is journalled in suitable bearings mounted in the horizontal portions 25 of the upper frame. At the left hand side of the press (Fig. 2) the shaft may extend through its associated bearing 35 into engagement with an adjusting mechanism 36 for eectinglateral register of the printing cylinder, which mechanism is supported on a bracket 31 secured to the hori- 'zontal frame. -Cooperating with the printing mounted between upper and lower guideways 42 and 43, respectively, and adapted to be moved toward the printing cylinder and held in operalbe provided with any suitable mechanism 52 (Fig. 1) for moving it into and out of operative positive engagement therewith by means of hydraul lic cylinders 44 having their piston rods 45 operatively connected with the bearing blocks. In order that the bearing blocks at each side of the press may move evenly in the guideways without causing skewing of the shaft 40, the lower side of each block is provided with. a toothed rack 46 which engages with a pinion 41 mounted on a shaft 48 supported in the side frames.

This entire construction and manner of mounting the impression cylinders is disclosedin and forms the subject matter of my Patent No. 2,263,323.

With the particular printing press arrangement thus far described, a web of paper or other4 material to be marked, may be fed substantially vertically downwardly between the printing cylinder 33 and impression cylinder 38 toreceive markings on one side thereof, and in such manner as to provide a maximum amount of live web before passing to a subsequent printing or treating unit, as disclosed in the above mentioned applicationv of Irving Gurwick. Ink or other marking material is supplied to the printing cylinder in the lower portion thereof in quantities greater than are needed for printing. I have shown ink being applied by means of my improved ink applicator 49 which is adapted to be `positioned close to the printing line and will be described in detail hereinafter. Excess ink is removed and the printing cylinder conditioned for printing by means of a laminated doctor blade 50 mounted in a holder 5| whichis supported for reciprocation in any suitable manner on the horizontal side frames 25. 'I'he doctor blade may tion and for adjusting its position when printing cylinders of different size-are employed.

It will be noted that the doctor blade'is positioned at the side of the printing cylinder opposite the printing line. For preventing evaporation of volatile ink solvents between the doctor blade and the printing line, the top portion of pendingapplication of Irving Gurwick. The.

shield 53 is positioned the desired distance from amasar the surface of the: printing cylinder lry'meansl of collars 54 (Fig. 2'). providedV on theshaft 34 or associated with thee bearings 35, and. said shield extends from: thef doctor blade tof a point closely' adjacent the printing; Movement ofV thee blanket of air is prevented by means of a resilient sealing strip 55. The shield may also be supported by means, of. arms 5.6 pivotally connected to lever arms 5.1 which may be pivoted to the top frame structure 2d andarranged to be.

moved 'into and outl of. operative position. by' means of an operating leverl 581. v

Heretofore, ink hasbeen supplied to the printing. cylinder by means of a fountain in which the cylinder vrotates or by other types of applicators which are adapted to direct a streamof ink upon the printing surface. When volatile inks have been used, it was thought necessary to enclose the fountain so as to prevent evaporation. I

have found, however, that if the ink is applied to the surface of the printing cylinder in a substantially uniform film of controlled thickness, and preferably along a line in close proximity to the line of printing, improved quality of printing' may' be effected without any detrimental evaporation from the cells of the engraved or printing cylinder. I.shall now describe one form ofl my improved ink applicator.

As best shown in Figs. 3, '1 and 8, the ink applicator 49 comprises an elongated trough memw vided with a threaded socket 80 for the reception of a hose nipple 8 I to which a suitable resilient supply hose 82 is connected by means of a 'clam-ping collar 83. Referring that the two Isupply hoses 82 are connected to` suitable nipples 84 provided in the ends of a suby stantially U-shaped distributing conduit 85. A

- conduit 86 leads fromthe distributing conduit 85 to'a pump 81 which may be mounted in any ber 60 having an inside curved ink distributing section or portion'6l and upper and lower sloping walls or edges 62 and 63, respectively. When the applicator is in operative position with respect to the printing cylinder,the lower edge 63 thereof is adapted to be spaced from the surface of the cylinder to provide a thin uniform groove -64 through which the ink will be fed in the desired thin uniform film, .while the upper edge 62 is provided with a lip 65 which practically touches, or is in close proximity to, the surface of the printing convenient 4location adjacent a removable ink reservoir 88 and driven, through a belt 89 arid suitable gears and shafts, by Aa motor 90 mounted on the frame of the press. A conduit 9| `having a hand operated valve 92 therein may be provided to connect the distributing conduit 85 and/or the conduit 86 with the reservoir so that when the press is shut down, `all ink may be easily drained from the applicator back into the reservoir; this conduit 9| also serves as a by-pass to regulate the fiow of ink to the applicator. The ink reservoir 88 comprises a large box-like tank having a suitable covered inlet 93 and a drain cock 94; and it is removably positioned on angle bars 95 provided on the base 20, and maintained in position thereon bymeans of stop members 96. The

` angle bars form tracks for the reservoir so that cylinder so as to reduce the tendency of ink to flow therethrough. Due to the curved shape of the ink distributing section 6| and the sloping lower edge 63, the ink contacting the surface of the cylinder beneath the trough will be forced inwardly toward the center of the sylinder so that all of the cells of the engraving will be completely filled. The construction also provides a rather wide area over which the ink is in contact with the surface of the printing cylinder. The

manner of mounting the applicator so 'that it may be properly. positioned and adjusted with respect to the printing cylinder will be described hereinafter.

Ink is supplied to the trough 60 through any suitable number of inlet orifices 66 opening into the curved distributing section 6I of the trough. I have shown two inlet orifices 66, each of which has an angular deflector or baffle plate 61 mounted thereover and secured to the edge 63 by means of screws 68, as. shown in Figs. '1 and 8. These deectors are provided with apertures 69 spaced -on either side of the orifice 66 and the entire construction is such that'- the ink which is fed through the orifices will be uniformly distributed throughout the length of thev applicator. To prevent the ink from passing out the ends of the trough, retainer members 10 are mounted in grooves 1| provided in the trough 60 adjacent each end of the printing cylinder 33. These retainers are arranged close to the ends of the cylinder, shaped to conform substantially to the surface of the cylinder as indicated at 12 in Figs. 6 and 7; and are provided with curved portions it may be easily removed from operative position without colliding with other parts of the press, a handle 91 being provided on'the end of the reservoir for this purpose. In this manner, the reservoir may be easily andquickly changed when it is desired to use ink of another color, and periods of shut down'are greatly reduced..

In Figs. 10, 11 and 12, I have shown a modified form of ink applicator 98 which embodies the same principles of operation as the applicator 49, but Vincludes certain additional features. As shown, the applicator 98 comprises a trough |00 substantially as long as the printing cylinder 33 andhaving a front wall -I 0 I, a rear wall |02, a bottom wall |03', and suitable vend walls |04, which to"- gether form an elongated ink distributing chamber I 05. `Front wall |0| is bent inwardly near the upper end thereof to form a support |06 -for a thin resilient ink metering and applying' blade |01 which extends into close proximity to the surface of the cylinder 33 and is removably secured to the support |06 by means of a clamping plate |08 and suitable screws |09. Beyond the ends of the cylinder 33 the front wall |0| has upwardlyextending deflecting portions |I0; and rear wall |02, at the upper end thereof, is curved inwardly toward the cylinder to provide a deflecting portion I Ink is fed into the chamber |05 through inlet nipples I I2 provided in the bottom wall |03 and connected with the supply hoses 82. As the ink enters the chamber |05 it will gradually fill said chamber until it overflows over the blade |01. The entire space between the blade and the surface-of the printing cylinder fills with ink, and as the cylinder rotates and more ink is supplied, the blade |01 will be deflected downwardly, as

' indicated in dotted lines in Fig. l2, to cause -the desired thin film of ink to be applied to the surface of the cylinder.v The particular advantage \of vnow to -Figs. 1 and 2, it 4will be seen thumb-screw |23 is loosened.

this applicator over the applicator 49 described above is that the entire chamber is lled with ink before any is applied to the printing cylinder;

and by maintaining the applicator substantially. horizontal, the ow of ink into the space between the blade |01 and the surface of the cylinder will position with respect to the surface of the cylinder during operation of the press,` and so supported and mounted that it may readily be adjusted to accommodate printing cylinders of different size, and may be moved from operative tol linoperative position. vI shall now describe the supporting and adjusting mechanism for the ink applicator.

\ As best shown in Figs. 2 and 4, the ink applicators are provided at the ends thereof with trunnions ||3 which are secured to the ends of the trough 60 or |00, in any suitable manner, and adapted to be pivotally supported in yokes I|4 provided on the upper ends of a pair of supporting arms |5. The supporting arms are mounted on a shaft I6 which is journalled in side frames |1 of a supporting structure which is designated as a whole (Figs. 1 and 3) bythe reference nurreral I8. This structure I |8 includes a plurality cf transverse members or spacing rods I|9 and forms the support for the ink applying and ink draining devices; it is removably mounted upon a carriage |20 which is adapted to be moved up and down with respect to the printing cylinder 33, as will be more fully described below.

For effecting angular adjustments of the sup-v porting arms II5,Y an arm |2| is secured inside one of the side frames |I1 to the shaft |-I6 by means of a pin |22 (Fig. 4) and provided at the end thereof with a suitable locking device, such as a thumb-screw |23 (Figs. l and 9). 'Ihis thumb-screwfis 'adapted to ride in a reinforced slot |24 provided in the associated side plate I1, so that the arm Amay be locked in any adjusted position. The shaft |-|6 may beprovided with a keyed'or squared end |25 which is adapted to receive a 4suitable hand crank |26 for turning the arms ||5 to any adjusted position when the Should it be necessary or desirable to set or adjust one of the arms I5 individually with respect to the other arm ||5, this may be accomplished by means of an' adjusting arml |21 fixed to the shaft ||6 adjacent one ofthe arms ||5. In Figs. 4, 5 and 9, it willbe observed that'the upper end of this arm |21 has a threaded opening for recciving a screw |28 which is provided with a suitable head |29 and lock nut |30 on the outer end thereof and an eccentrically mounted disk or cam |3| on the inner end. The cam |3| is adapted to engage the side walls of a suitable'grooved or channeled member |32, fastened to the associated arm ||5, in. any convenient manner. By loosening the lock nut |30 and turningthe head |29, cam |3| engaging the walls of the channelled member will cause the associated arm I|5 to be vmoved through a very small arc for adjustments with respect .to the other arm I I5.

Provision is also made for adjusting the angular position of the applicator in the yokes |4. As shown inv Figs. 4 and 8, a'downwardly extending arm |33 is xed upon one of the trunnions ||3 and positioned adjacent a wall or lug |34 provided on member |35 which is secured to the associated arm II5 in any suitable manner. A screw |36 is threaded through this wall |34 and extends into a threaded opening provided in the arm |33, so that by turning said screw the applicator may be rotated in the yokes I4.

Any ink which may escape from either applicator 49 or 98 is caught by a shield |31 which is secured to the associated trough by means of screws |38 and suitably spaced therefrom in any convenient manner. The shield may be of any shape, but preferably has end walls |39 and an upwardly curved portion |40 which extends into close proximity to the surface of the cylinder and the web. A large drain pan I4| of any suitable shape and construction is arranged beneath the printing cylinder 33 and, as shown in Fig. 3, is at least wide enough to receive any ink which 'i drops from the shield |38 andalso all excess ink removed by the doctor blade 50. 'I'he drain .pan has downwardly sloping bottom Awalls which lead secured to the extension-|44 by means of a collar |46 and passes through an opening provided in the top of the reservoir 88 so as to return all ink thereto. l

The drain pan |4| may be supported in any convenient manner beneath the printing cylinder 33 and shield |31. I have found it desirable, however, to provide flangesv |'41 on the sides of the pan, which'flanges are adapted to lit into and engage with suitable angular shoulders |48 provided on the upper edges of the side walls ||1 of the supporting structure 8. Thus, the entire drain pan may be easily removed from the supporting structure, if desired.

Referring now to Figs. 1 and 3, it/ will be noted that each of the side walls |I1 of the supporting structure is provided with feet |50 which rest on angle bars I 5I secured to substantially horizontally disposed arms |52 forming part of the carriage |20. These arms are provided at the top of and formed integral1y'with,'a pair of vertical side members |53 which are spaced apart and maintained substantially rigid by means of transverse supporting rods |54.- At its upper end, each side member |53 is provided with a collar |55 and at its lower end with a collar |56, and

these collars are slidably mounted on theiras-r sociated tubular supports 22 of the main frame of the press so that the carriage |20 may be moved up and down thereon, i. e. toward and-away from the printing cylinder.

For effecting such movement of the carriage |20, a toothed rack |51 may be provided on the edge of each side member |53 and between the upper and lower collars. |55 and |56 thereof. Theseracks are arranged to engage with pinions |58,mounted on the ends of a shaft which is journalled in suitable bearings provided in collars I 6| secured to the tubular members 22. Shaft |60 may be constructed to receive a suitable crank so that it may be easily turned for moving the carriage which will be heldin any position to which it is moved by means of a ratchet gear |62 (Fig. 1) mounted on the shaft |60 and.

cooperating with a suitable pawl |63 pivoted on the collar |6|. Fig. 1 shows the carriage |20 in its lower inoperative position, while Figs. 2 and 3 may be made secured to the transverse rod |54 extending between the lower ends of the side frames |53. The

sprockets may be mounted for rotation on stub shafts |68 which are attached to the side frames of the press adjacent the horizontal frame members in any convenientmanner.

From the drawings ,and the foregoing description, it will be apparent that by rotating the shaft |60, the carriage |20 may be easily moved from its lower position as shown in operative position, as' shown in Figs. 2 and 3. When in the .upper position, the various adjustments described above may be made for setting the ink applicator properly with respect to the printing cylinder. As the carriage is moved back to its lower position, the conduit |45 recedes into the reservoir; and` when in the lower Fig. V1 position, the entire supporting structure ||8 and the apparatus carried thereby may be removed from the carriage simply by releasing the coupling |43v on the drain pipe, said coupling being positioned about opposite the line between the bottom of the side frames l1 and the top of the horizontal arms To facilitate moving the carriage, aL

its other end suitablyv Fig. 1, t o its upper- Likewise, the ink applicator 4') or 98 may be' that the carriage* l'zo a. printing line between said two cylinders; means for' applying a thin and uniform lm of ink to the surface of said lprinting cylinder; means for conditioning the surface of said cylinder for printing; and meansarranged between the conditioning means and the `printing line, in the direction of rotation of said printing cylinder, for` i preventing evaporation of ink from the conditioned surface.

4. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of an engraved printing cylinder; an impression cylinder arranged substantiallyhorizontally beside said printing cylinder and providing a printingl line between .said -two cylinders; and

means for applying a thin and uniform lm of ink to the surface of said printing cylinder in the first quadrant thereof beyond the printing line.

5. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of an engraved printing cylinder; an impression cylinder positionedsubstantially horizontally beside said printing cylinder so as to impression line between said cylinders; and means positioned'directly below such printing line fo applying a thin andl uniform lm of ink'to the surface of said printing cylinder.

6. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of an engraved cylinder so as to provide an impression line :between said cylinders; and means positioned below such printing line for applying a thin and uniform film of ink to the surface of said printing cylinder, said ink applying means comprising an elongated trough-shaped member having a chamber portion which is adapted to hold a body of l`ink in contact with the surface of said printing readily lremoved from the yokes-| Il, and the drain pan |4| lifted from the supporting structure. In this manner, changes of parts forprinting cylvinders; of different size, for cleaning, for repairs and the like, may be quickly effected' and inoperative periods cut to a While I have described preferred embodiments of the apparatus and method features of my in- .v

vention, it will be understood that various changes and certain features or steps employed without others, without departing from my invention or sacrificing any of -its advantages.

What I claim is: I

1. A method of inking an engraved printing cylinder with an ink containing volatile ink solvents which comprises applying 'a thin andsubstantially uniform iilm of ink to the surface of the cylinder, wiping all excess ink from said cylinder so as to condition said cylinder for printing, and protecting the thus conditioned surface from evaporation by means of a thin film of air saturated with volatile ink solvents.

2. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of an engraved printing cylinder; an ink applying member positioned adjacent the surface of the printing cylinder and including a chamber for holding a body of ink in contact with the surface of the printing cylinder and a regulating portion which is adapted to'force the-.ink against the surface of the printing cylinder and regulate the thickness of thefilm of ink applied thereto; means for supplying ink to said applying member;

and carriage means-arranged beneath said printing cylinder for supporting said ink applying member and moving it vertically toward and away from said printing cylinder.

3. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of an engraved printing cylinder; an impression cylinder cooperating therewith and providing against the surface of the'cylinder.

1 tion of an engraved printing cylinder; an imcylinder and a lip portionangularly disposed adjacent the surface 'of the printing cylinder so as to create an inwardly directed component of force which is adapted to force ink' inwardly 7. In an intaglio printing press, the comb-inapression cylinder positioned beside said printing cylinder so as to provide an impression line between said cylinders; and-means positioned below such printing line for applying a thin and 4uniform film of ink to the surface of said'printing cylinder, said ink applying means comprising an elongated trough-shaped member disposed adjacent the surface lof the printing cylinder and having a lower lip portion which is positioned a distance from said surface s'o as topredetermined regulate the thickness of the film of ink applied to said surface, and which .is' angularly disposed with reference to the surface of the printing cylinder so as to create an inwardly directed component of force which causes the ink to be pressed against the surface of the cylinder.

8. In an intaglio printing press, tion of a substantially horizontally disposed printing couple including an .engraved printing c ylinder; a frame member; a carriage slidably mounted on said frame member. for vertical move-- ment beneath said printing cylinder; and means 'carried by said carriage for applying ink to the surface of said printing cylinder;

9.'In an intaglio printing press, the combination of an engravedprinting cylinder; an impression cylinder positioned substantially horizontally beside said printing cylinder soas to ,provide a printing line betweensaid cylinders;

and means positioned below said printing vline for applying a thin and uniform lm of ink to the surface of said printing cylinder, said ink provide an printing cylinder; an im pression cylinder positioned beside said. printing the commia-Vv applying means being supported on a carriage which is adapted to be moved vertically toward and away from said printing cylinder so that the 14. A unitary intaglio printing press, comprising a base ;^side frame members mounted on said ink applying .means may beepositioned properly g with respect to the surface of said printing cyl-.- inder regardless of the s ize of the latter.

-10. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of a substantially horizontally disposed printing couple including an engravedprinting cylinder; a frame member; a carriage slidably mounted on said frame member vfor Vertical movement beneath said printing couple; means carlried by said carriage for applying ink tothe surface of said printing cylinder; and means for moving said carriage toward and away from said printing' cylinder.

11. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of an intaglio printing cylinder; wiping mechanism lfor said cylinder; a carriage mounted beneath said printing cylinder for vertical movement toward and away from said printing cylinder; means mounted on said carriage `for applying ink to the surface of said printing cylinder; and means disposed beneath said printing cylinder and carried by said carriage for receiving the excess ink removed from the inder by said wiping mechanism.

- 12. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of a substantially horizontally disposed printing couple ,including an intaglio printing cylinder;l a carriage beneath said printing couple and movable vertically toward and away from said printing cylinder; a pair of supporting arms pivotally connected to said carriage; an ink applying member mounted on said supporting arms; and means for adjusting said supporting arms to various angular positions withreference to said carriage. 13. In'an intaglio printing press, the combination of a substantially horizontally disposed printing couple including an engraved printing cylinder; a pair of supporting arms arranged beneath said printing couple; an ink applying member rotatably supported in said arms; means for .moving said arms to various angular positions with reference to said printing cylinder; and means for adjusting the angular position of said ink applying member with respect to said supporting arms.

printing cylbase; an' engraved printing cylinder rotatably journalled in said side frame members; a carriage mounted beneath said printing cylinder for vertical movement toward and away from said printing cylinder; mounted on said carriage; an ink reservoir removably mounted on said base beneath said carriage; and means for conveying ink from said reservoir to said ink applying member;

15. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of an engraved printing cylinder; an impression cylinder arranged substantially horizontally beside said printing cylinder and providing a- -printing line between said two cylinders; means for applying a thin and uniform film of ink to the surface of said printing cylinder in the first quadrant thereof beyond the printing line; means for conditioning the surface of said cylinderfor printing; and means arranged between the conditioning means and the printing line, in the direction of rotation of said printing cylinder, for preventing evaporation of ink from the conditioned surface.

16. vIn an intaglio printing press, the combination of an engraved printing cylinder; an impression cylinder cooperatively arranged at the side of said printing cylinder and providing a printing line between said two cylinders; and means for applying a thin and substantially uniform film of ink to the surface of said printing cylinder in the first quadrant thereof beyond the printing line.

17. In an intaglio printing press, the combination of an engraved printing cylinder; an impression cylinder arranged at the Aside of said printing cylinder andA providing a printing line which is positioned at the side of said printing cylinder; means for applying a thin and sub.- stantially uniform lm of ink to the surface of said printing cylinder; means for conditioning the surface of saidA cylinder for printing; and

means arranged between the conditioning means and the printing line, in the direction of rotation of said printing cylinder, for preventing evaporation of ink from the conditioned surface.

` ARTHUR M. WICKWIRE, JR.

an ink applying member

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2638843 *Jun 29, 1950May 19, 1953Murray Halley AngusRotary photogravure printing machine
US3186335 *Dec 19, 1962Jun 1, 1965Guy Gaulin JosephInking mechanism
US3641932 *Apr 27, 1970Feb 15, 1972Publication CorpInk applicator for gravure printing press
US3739717 *Jul 2, 1971Jun 19, 1973Riggs & Lombard IncWire printing apparatus having closed inking system
US4066014 *Jan 5, 1976Jan 3, 1978American Bank Note CompanyPressurized ink applicator for intaglio printing press
US4444102 *Dec 21, 1981Apr 24, 1984Corning Glass WorksSelf aligning doctor/applicator blade assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/157, 101/366
International ClassificationB41F9/06, B41F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41F9/065
European ClassificationB41F9/06B3