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Publication numberUS2280414 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1942
Filing dateAug 16, 1939
Priority dateAug 16, 1939
Publication numberUS 2280414 A, US 2280414A, US-A-2280414, US2280414 A, US2280414A
InventorsKoppinger Nicholas G
Original AssigneeBriggs Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface ornamenting machine and method
US 2280414 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 21, 1942. Nfs. KPPINGERv I 2,280,414

SURFACE ORNAMENTING MACHlNE AND METHD FiledAug. 16, 1959 @Sheets-sheath if, @g

[N VEN TOR I galio/d5 ffyfJ/d//Z'Zgen April 2l, l942- N. G. KOPPINGER 2.280,4'14

" SURFACE ORNAMENTING MA'crluNE AND METHOD Filed Aug. 16, 1939 f 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 i: M y

"April 21. 1942 N. G. KOPPINGER .2,280,414

I SURFACE ORNAMENTING MCHINE AND METHOD Filed Aug; 16, 1939 v 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 ,sac

Y '59 l .JII INVENTOR ATTORNEY KOPPINGER .2,280,414

April 21,v 1942.

' SURFACE ORNAMENTING MACHINE AND METHOD Filed Aug: 16, 1939 v 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR /flvyef.

v ATTORN y Patented Apr. 21, 1942 UNITED STATES `PATEnr oEEicE SURFACE ORNAMENTIN G MACHINE ANDI METHOD Nicholas G. Koppinger, St. Clair Shores, Mich., assigner to Briggs Manufacturing Company, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application August 16, 1939, Serial No. 290,508

16 Claims. (Cl. 10i-175) This invention relates to surface ornamenting or decorating machines and methods, and more particularly to machines and methods for applying surface ornamentations such as a wood grain nish to articles or workpieces including curved surfaces such, for instance, as metal moldings for windows of motor vehicle bodies. The present application is a continuation-impart of my copencling application Serial No. 285,373 filed July 19, 1939.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a surfaceornamenting or decorating machine which can apply or print a desired design or ornamentation to a curved surface without distorting or smearing such design, particularly in places where thecurvature of the surface changes at an increased rate,1 such, for instance, as in corners. l

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved surface ornamenting machine of the character specified in the preceding paragraph, which can apply to a workpiece'Y two or more distinct designs in one operation without distorting either of said designs; previously, two or more separate machines and two or more operations were necessary.

A further object of the invention is toprovide an improved surface ornamenting machine which can apply to a workpiece two separate designs of different colors or tones in a single operation and without mixing the inks of such designs.

A still further object of the invention is to providegan improved surface ornamenting machine having a gelatin composition transfer belt and an inking or design roller therefor, improved means being provided for removing the excess ink from said design roller.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a` surface ornamenting machine having a pigment receiving belt, improved means being provided for cleaning the ink which may be left on the belt after the transfer of the portion of the ink to the workpiece.

It is an added object of the present invention to provide an improved surface decorating machine of the foregoing character, which machine is relatively simple in construction, safe and dependable in operation, has `high production capacity, and is relatively inexpensive to manufacture and service.

A still further object of the invention is to` provide an improved methodof decorating surfaces, particularly curved surfaces, with multiple-tone designs.

Otherobjects of this invention will `appear in observer looking as i machine.

Fig. 4`is` a view similar in part to Fig. 2, the observer looking on the rear left-hand corner of the machine.

Fig. 5 is a view partly in section showing the form pulley and the parts adjacent thereo, the indicated by the arrow 5 in Fis. `3.

Fig. 6 is a side view showing the arrangements ofthe inlring` rollers as well as the pigment receiving rollerand the driving connection therebetween. l

Fig. 7 isa top view of a portion of the structure shown in Fig. 6.

IFig. `8 is a front View of the structure shown in Fig.` 6.

Fig.` 9 is a fragmentary view partly in section taken in the direction of the arrows on the section plane passing through the line 9-9 of Fig. 6L

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary view taken in the l direction of the arrows from the line lll- Hl of Fig. 8.

Fig. 1l isa perspective front view of the machine, the workpiece supporting table being shown inl its raised position and the workpiece being arranged in -its operative position between the transfer belt and the guide rollers.

Fig. l2 is a perspective view of a workpiece for which the machine described herein is particularly` adapted.

Fig. 13 is a transverse sectional view of the workpiece, thesection being taken on the transverse vertical plane passing perpendicularly to the workpiece through the line I3-l3 of Fig. 12. Before explaining in detail the present inven- "tionit is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, since the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways.

Also it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation, and it is not intended to limit the invention claimed herein beyond the requirements of the prior art.

In the drawings there is shown, by way of eX- ample, a surface decorating or ornamenting machine embodying the present invention. The machine illustrated in the drawings and hereinafter described is constructed especially for applying surface ornamentation to automobile window moldings, which ornamentation is usually in the form of a wood graining finish. It will be understood, however, that the machines embodying the present invention are not limited to the above use and may be successfully used for applying ornamentations to other articles or workpieces, particularly those having curved or irregular surfaces.

The machine herein described is of the twotone or two-design type. It is intended for use in cases when the finish to be applied to the workpiece is of two-color character or when the design being of substantially one color cannot be for some reason applied to the transfer belt with the aid of a single design or inking roller. Attempts have been made to apply designs of two different colors directly to a single transfer belt with the aid of two engraved design or inking rollers. However, such attempts did not prove successful because of mixing of the inks of different colors and spoiling the entire artistic effect of the finish.

In accordance with the present invention the first design is applied to the transfer belt with the aid of an engraved metal design roller. The second design provided on the second metal design roller is not transferred directly to the transfer belt over the first ink but is first transferred to an intermediate roller having a smooth pigment receiving surface. Intermediate rollers made of substantially the same material as the transfer belts prove to give very satisfactory results. The intermediate roller is arranged to be in contact with a transfer belt and to transfer to said belt the dyeing pigment which the surface of the roller absorbs from the second design or inking roller. With the aid of such a construction mixing of the inks is entirely eliminated and the resulting ornamentation comes out just as it was intended, clear-cut and denite.

Referring to the drawings the machine illustrated therein comprises generally a base 2Q which may be of a circular form, in which base there is aiii-Xed an upstanding standard 2| serving as a .main frame or skeleton on which the entire machine is built up. The operative mechanisrns of the machine may be divided structurally into three parts in accordance with the way in which they are connected to the standard 2|; the upper portion which includes the drive, the transfer belt, the design rollers therefor, the ink supplying means and the associated mechanisms; the lower portion which includes the workpiece supporting and contacting means, namely, the form pulley, the guide rollers and the supporting table; the third part includes the pedal and connections thereof with the mechanisms of the lower portion.

The upper portion of the machine comprises a sleeve 2? fitted on the standard 2 l, which sleeve is split for a portion of its length and it may be drawn together at said split portion to grasp the standard 2|, this being effected with the aid of a screw 24 provided with a handle 25 for easier operation. The standard 2| is provided with a rack 26 cooperating with a gear (not shown) carried by a member 2l provided with a handle 23. When it is desired to raise or lower the upper portion of the machine as may be necessary for removal of the transfer belt 3%, the handle 28 is taken hold of and the screw 24 is loosened. In this way the upper sleeve 23 is made free to move up and down on the standard 2|, and such motion thereof may be effected by rotating the handle 28 in the corresponding direction. For steadying the sleeve 23 on the standard 2| the screw EG is tightened by rotating the handle 25.

The mechanisms comprised by the lower portion of the machine are assembled on the sleeve 3| which is similar in its operative purport to the sleeve 23, the difference being in the fact that the sleeve 3| is provided with positioning screws 32 and has no raok-and-gear means for raising and lowering the entire lower portion, provision of which is not necessary, since the lower portion is positioned permanently for a definite type of work and the height of the operator. Changing the position of the lower portion would require changing the length of the rods connecting the mechanisms mounted on said lower portion with the pedal 33.

The upper portion of the machine also includes a pulley for driving the transfer belt, means for driving said pulley, an inking or design roller for transferring the dyeing pigment of a predetermined pattern directly to the transfer belt, an intermediate roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment to the transfer belt over the ink transferred to said belt by the rst design roller, a second design roller for transferring dyeing pigment to said intermediate roller, means for supplying ink to both of said design rollers, and scraper means for removing the excess ink from the design rollers, as well as scraper means for cleaning the transfer belt. The upper portion of the machine also carries means for driving the design rollers, the intermediate roller and the inky o supplying means.

The lower portion includes a form pulley over which the transfer belt passes being driven by said driving pulley; the form pullei7 generally conforms to the cross sectional shape of the workpiece; the lower portion further includes a swinging table for supporting the molding or workpiece in its operative position; guide rollers for guiding the workpiece during the printing or ornamenting operation and maintaining the contact between the workpiece and the transfer belt; and finally means for locking the swinging table in the supporting position. The swinging table and the mechanisms operatively connected therewith are operated with the aid of the pedal 33 mounted on the base 2|), which pedal is connected with said swinging table and the mechanisms connected therewith with the aid of suitable rods.

Referring to the drawings, there is provided on the upper sleeve 23 a horizontally extending platform 35 on which there is mounted an electric motor 35 drivingly connected by means of a belt 3'! with a speed reducing box 33 of any suitable construction. On the structural continuation of a shaft 32 of the speed reducing box 38 there is mounted a driving pulley 4e. The shaft 39 is connected by means of trains of gears with the shafts of the first design roller 4|, second design roller 42 and intermediate roller 43, see Fig. 8. In order to prevent distortion of the image or design transferred by the design rollers 4 I' and `nected by means of pipes 42 to the transfer belt 30 and the intermediate roller 43 which also transfers the design received tothe transfer belt 30, it is important to have the design rollers 4| and 42, the intermediate roller 43 and the belt 30 operate at the same surface speed, that is Without slippage between their surfaces. The above may be effected in a plurality of ways. I` prefer to have the driving pulley 40 and the first design roller` 4| operate at the same rotative speed.` In order to prevent slippage of the belt 30 at the first design roller 4|, the respective sizes of the driving pulley and the first design roller 4| should be properly selected. I prefer to have a design roller which has a radius equal substantially to the sum of the radius of the driving pulley plus the thickness of the transfer belt. A small correction for the above geometric calculation may be necessary in order to provide for the slightcompression of the transfer belt between the first design roller 4l anda pressure roller pressing the belt against said design roller, as well as for the slight stretching of the relatively heavy belt 30 due to the centrifugal force of operation. I also prefer to have the second design roller 42 and the intermediate roller 43 of the same diameters and to operate at the same rotative speed which may be effected by providing gear ratios of one-to-one between said rollers, or any equal gear ratios between the shaft 39 and the shafts of said rollers respectively, if separate gear trains are used as in the pres ent instance. i

The design rollers 4| and 42 are in the form of cylinders on the outside surface whereof there is provided the desired pattern or design. I prefer to use copper cylinders having a pattern or image provided on the surfaces thereof by the well known photoengraving process extensively used in the art of printing. In this case a wooden board of the corresponding size is rst finished to show its grain and is thereupon photographed for the purpose of producing the images on 'the design rollers which if applied one after the other will produce the nal design. In order to prevent rapid wearing out of the engraved oopper surfaces of the design surfaces, they may be chromium plated to provide better wearing surfaces. The images or designs on the rollers 4| and 42 are produced by minute depressions or indentations retaining the printing ink. When a relatively soft transfer belt comes in contact with Y the surfaces of the design rol1ers,`the ink retained in said depressions is Itransferred onto the pigment receiving surface of the belt. When, in turn, the surface of the transfer belt comes in contact with the surface of the workpiece, the dyeing pigment is transferred from the transfer belt onto the surface of the workpiece.

Means for supplying ink to the design rollers 4| and 42 comprise in the present embodiment of the invention two independent systems, since inks of two different colors may be used. Each of said systems comprises a pump of any desired type preferably a rotary pump such as shown at 44 and 45, suitably driven fromthe motor 36. The intake sides of the pumps 44 and 45 are con- 46 and 41, each composed of a plurality of sections to produce proper turns, with the reservoirs aand 49 which serve both as the overflow and the supply reservoirs. The discharge sides of the `pumps 44 and 45 are provided with pipe connections 5l) and 5| having discharge nozzles 52 and 53 adapted to discharge the ink in thin wide streams onto the surfaces of the rotating design rollers4| and 42, respectively Plug valves 54 and 55 are provided in the discharge pipes 50 and 5| with the aid of which it is possible to regulate within the desired limits the.

amount of ink delivered to each design roller.

56 is a priming tank for the pump 45, while 51 indicates a plug enabling the intake pipe 46 to be cleaned.

The first design roller 4| is adapted to bear directly against the pigment receiving surface of the transfer belt 30. It is mounted on a shaft 69 driven from the shaft 39 with a train of gears including meshing gears 6I and 62, see particularly Figs. 7 and 8. The ink delivered by the discharge nozzle 52 covers the surface of the design roller 4I completely and being of a certain density it forms on the surface of the inking roller a layer of considerable thickness. Therefore means are provided to scrape olf the excess ink from the surface of the roller and to leave the ink only in the above mentioned depressions or indentations. In the present embodiment of the invention the scraping means are in the form of a thin scraper blade 63 secured in a shaft 64 mounted in a bracket 65. The bracket 65 is secured to `an extension of the sleeve 23 with the aid of screws 66 passing through elongated holes, see Fig. 7, in order to permit adjustment of the bracket 65 and, consequently, of the scraper blade 63. It can be clearly seen from an examination of Figs. 6 land 7 that the adjustments permitted by the elongated holes enable changing the angle at which the blade 63 contacts the design roller 4|. A rod 61 is secured to the shaft 64 and carries at its end a weight 68 which can be adjustably moved along said rod 61, thus changing the pressure which the blade 63 exerts on the design roller 4|.

In order to prevent uneven wear of theV scraper and the design roller, the scraper is made horizontally reciprocating. Means effecting reciprocations of the scraper 63 are exemplified in the present embodiment of the invention by a cam plate 69 mounted for rotation with the roller 4| and bearing on the follower end 64a of the shaft 64. A spring 16 retained in place by a bracket 1| is adapted to press the follower end 64a against the cam plate 69 to ensure the proper operation of` the above described cam and follower means. Side Scrapers 12 are provided to scrape the ends of the design roller 4|. The Scrapers 12 are secured to the reservoir 48 and are provided with bent ends to ensure proper contact with the ends ofthe roller 4|. The ink scraped by the Scrapers 63 and 12 is returned to the reservoir 48. l

As the roller 4| rotates, the scraper 63 scrapes off the ink from the only in the indentations. By virtue of the provision of the adjustable bracket 65 permitting changing the angle at which the scraper blade 63 contacts the surface of the design roller,` it is possible to vary the quantity of ink which is left on the design roller 4|. This arrangement permits varying the quantity of ink which is available for transfer to the transfer belt 36, thereby making the design transferred to the workpiece either heavier or lighter as the circumstances may require. The same ends may be attained by adjustments of the weight 66, as mentioned.

r A pressure roller 13 is mounted on one end of the bell crank 14Y which, in turn, is rotatably mounted on the shaft 39 of the driving pui1ey`4n. To the second end of the bell crank 14 there is secured a rod 15 carrying at its endan adjustable weight 1.6. It will be clear from an examisurface thereof leaving ink nation of the drawings and particularly of Figs. Band 1l, that action of the weight 16 causes the pressure roller 13 to press the transfer belt 39 against the design roller M, thereby ensuring a proper pressure contact between the transfer belt and the design roller. The degree of pressure exerted by the pressure roller on the transfer belt 30 determines the quantity of ink which is transferred from the inking roller to the transferbelt, and therefore adjustments of the weight i6 may be resorted to in order to vary additionally or to control the character of the design Which is printed by the transfer belt on the workpiece. The greater the pressure of the pressure roller 'i3 on the belt 39, the more ink is transferred to the belt 35i and therefrom to the workpiece, and consequently the heavier is the design printed.

The second design roller 2 is mounted below the rst design roller til and somewhat farther away from the belt Sii in order to provide room for the intermediate roller 13S. The design roller 42 is secured to a shaft 'il journalled in an angular bracket "I8, see Fig. l0, which bracket is fixed to a suitable structural extension anchored on the sleeve 23.

The shaft 'il is drivingly connected to the shaft 39 with the aid of two trains of gears. The first train of gears connects the shaft 3S with the shaft "i9 of the intermediate roller 43. This train includes gears 8d, 8l, 82 and 63, best shown in Fig. 8. rThe second train of gears connects drivingly the shaft of the intermediate roller 'I9 with the shaft 'H of the design roller M, and it includes gears 84, 85, B and Si. 81 are mounted on the shafts 'i9 and TF, respectively. The idler gear 35 is mounted on a stud carried by the bracket "J8, while the idler gear S5 is mounted on a stud S8 supported by a bracket 89 secured to the suitable extension of the sleeve 23 with the aid of screws 9U. The bracket 'i8 rotates around the center of the stud 88 as indicated in Figs. 6 and 8, and therefore the shaft 'H and the roller 42 carried thereby may move within predetermined limits toward and away from the intermediate roller t2, which provides for frequent variation in the sizes of intermediate rollers. The adjusting movements of the roller 42 are effected with the aid of adjustment screws 9i passing through a threaded eX- tension of the bracket i8 and bearing against a structural portion rigid with the intermediate roller 43, see Fig. l0.

The second design roller t2 is provided with a surface scraper generally indicated by the numeral 92 and end Scrapers 93, the construction of which is substantially similar to that of the above described Scrapers of the rst design roller 4i, for which reason no detailed description of said Scrapers is deemed necessary.

The intermediate roller 43 has a smooth pigment receiving surface and may be made of the same material or surface characteristics as the transfer belt 3Q, which belt it is adapted to contact as best seen in Fig. 6. A pressure roller 94 mounted beneath the pressure roller 13 is adapted to exert pressure on the transfer belt 3i), pressing the some toward the intermediate roller t3 and thus ensuring proper pressure contact. The pressure roller 14 is mounted on a bell crank 95 hingedly secured on a bracket 96 which bracket is secured to the sleeve 23. A rod 91 secured to the bell crank 95 is provided with an adjustment weight 98.

The intermediate roller 63 is provided with a Gears 84 and Cil surface scraper 99 and two end Scrapers I located to scrape oif the ink from the portions which had come in contact with the transfer belt and are about to come in contact with the second design roller 42. In the present embodiment of the invention considering the direction of the rotation of the design roller 42, said Scrapers are located underneath the roller d3, as is best shown in Fig. 6.

The belt 35i is of a type generally used in printing work. 1t may comprise a base` 39a. made of a material capable of sustaining the upper layer 3th made from a suitable material such as a mixture of glue and gelatin to provide a smooth pigment receiving surface. To the base 30a there is secured a \/-type belt extension which increases the strength of the belt and serves as a guide therefor preventing slipping off of the belt from the pulleys. Suitable grooves are provided in the pulleys to receive the extension 30C as can be seen in Figs. 5 and 7.

After the first design roller M prints the first design on the belt ifi), the belt brings this printed design in contact with the intermediate roller 43. The second design roller prints the second design, usually with an ink of different color, on the intermediate roller 53. The intermediate roller i3 being in contact with the transfer belt 30, the design printed on said roller 43 is transferred to the belt tti over the design printed by the first design roller i i, and both designs printed one over the other are continuously carried toward the workpiece and are transferred thereto as is described below in detail. When the intermediate roller L33 contacts the transfer belt 30, the printing operation is mutual, that is, while the second design is being transferred to the belt 33 some of the rst design is printed on the rollerl 53. Since the intermediate roller t3 has a smooth surface, provision of the Scrapers 99 and |00 cleans this roller completely before it again comes in contact with the second design roller, the scraped off ink being collected in the waste tank it? (see Fig. 6). If the intermediate roller is eliminated and the metal design roller is caused to be in contact with the transfer belt, it would not be possible to clean or scrape off the first design which would be printed on the second design roller and mixing of the inks would occur. This would result because of the presence of the engraving indentations on the metal design roller and impossibility of removing the ink therefrom with the aid of a metal scraper.

The lower portion of the machine is mounted on the sleeve 3i as mentioned. Said lower portion comprises a form pulley generally indicated by the numeral lili, mounted on a shaft |02 oatingly journalled in a bracket it?) secured to the sleeve 3i. The pulley iti is of a laminated construction. It comprises a plurality of disks as best shown in Fig. 5, and is shaped to the general form of the cross section of the workpiece. The disks forming the pulley llii may rotate independently of each other and adjust themselves automatically to the surface speed of the belt. By virtue of such a construction distortion of designs and smearing thereof on the workpiece due to slippage are substantially eliminated. The belt 35i connects the driving pulley d and the form pulley lili. The tension of said belt is adjusted with the aid of the gear-and-rack means 26 and 2l' operated with the aid of the handle 28 to change the elevation of the upper portion of the machine. The same means are reretightening said screws.

sorted to in order to permit removal of the belt for repairs or inspection.

`A swinging table |04 is secured to the bracket |05 through the adjustment plates |06, see Figs.

i 3 and 4, with the aid of which the position of `said swinging table with relation to the form pulley may be varied by loosening the `screws |01, moving the table a predetermined distance and The brackets |05 are securedto a shaft |08 journalled in a suitable extension of the sleeve 3|. To the brackets |05 there is secured an arm |09 on the end of which there is provided an adjustable weight which may lbe adjustably moved along said arm and fixed in a desired position bymeans of a suitable set screw. 'I'he weight is heavier than the table and therefore it always tends to maintain the table |04 in its raised or upper position, external `means beingr provided for bringing the table |04 into its lower position.

In operating the machine the workpiece or 'molding |0 is first laid flat on the table, whereupon the table is swung into the position in which the molding comes within less than one-half of an inch from the transfer belt 30, and is locked in such position with the aid of special means described in detail below. Through this distance of less than one-half of an inch hereinafter jtermed the clearance, the workpiece travels substantially perpendicular to the surface of the transfer belt and therefore when it cornes into contact with said belt, no slippage of the mating `surfaces occurs, thus giving a, quick and reliable contact for producing a clear undistorted image which is printed on the workpiece by the belt.

The actual contact between the yworkpiece l and the transfer belt`30 is effected with the aid `of guide rollers which are provided with p grooves la` receiving the edge 0a of the workpiece ||0 moving along said rollers Ill.

` Means for operating the guide rollers are exemplified by a bar ||2 which is best shown in Figs. 1 and 2. The bar ||2 is hingedly mounted at ||3 -to the bracket |05 and it moves with said `bracket as the same rotates around the shaft |08. A1 compression spring ||4`always tends to keep the bar 2, and consequently therollers carried thereby, in their raised position. Re-

sistance of the spring ||4 may be adjustably varied with the aid of a suitable nut-and-screw means, see Fig. 5.

Means are provided whereby the bar 2 and the rollers |I| can travel through the clearance distance independently of the bracket |05 and `consequently the swinging table |04. The bar ||2 is connected to the pedal bar |I5 hinged to the base as at H0, by means of a rod ||l. This connection is of a positive character and 1 therefore as soon as the operator steps on the ,pedal 33 the bar ||2 and the rollers begin to move down through the clearance space, also moving the workpiece away from the transfer belt 30.` As soon as the rollers are removed fromthe transfer belt for the clearance distance. "la collar ||8 secured to the rod |I`| engagesa bracket H9 through which the bar slides freely. The bracket ||9 is connected by means of an adjustable rod |20 and a cross head I2| ...with a crank |22 secured to the shaft |08 with which'the table |04 is adapted to swing. When n the, collar |18 engages the bracket 9, further pressure on the pedal`33 causes rotation of the crank |22 and consequently swingingof the table |04 downward against the resistance of the the table |04 is thus brought into its lowermost position, the operator moves the pedal 33 slightly to the right in order to cause the pedal bar ||5 to get under the hook |23, thus locking the table |04 in its lowermost position. It will now be understood in view of the foregoing that position of the collar H8 on the rod determines the clearance distance and the same may be varied by moving said collar and xing the same with the aid of a set screw |24 in a desired position on said rod"| I1.

The rollers IH and the bar ||2 carrying the same are so arranged with respect to the swinging table |04 that when aworkpiece is laid iiat on said table the edge |0a of the workpiece is received in the grooves ||a of the rollers Loading of the workpiece is extremely easy when the table is in its lower position, the workpiece being simply picked up from a pile and put on said table |04 so as to engage the guide rollersl table |04 into its upper position.

Means are provided for locking the swinging exemplied` by a bell crank |21 having a hook `|270; cooperating with a tooth |26 to lock the same to a stop |25, see Fig. 2. To the opposite end of the bell crank 2l there is connected a spring |28 anchored on a member rigid with the sleeve 3|, which spring tends to raise the straight end of the bell crank |21, to lower its hooked end and to lock the tooth |23 as explained.

Means are provided for unlocking the tooth |26 by raising the hooked end |2'la of the bell crank |21 when the guide rollers reach the end of the clearance distance. Said means are exemplified by rod |29 one end of which is connected to the pedal bar H5, while its other end is provided with ahead having an elongated slot |30 which is engaged by a pin |3| carried by the bell The length of the slot |30 is determined by the length of the clearancedistance. The length of the rod |20 is so selected that when the table |04 is in its raised position, the pin |3| is at the lower end of the slot |30. Therefore when the operator appliespressure to the foot pedal 33, the rod |29 can move together with the bar |2 and rollers bringing the workpiece flat on the table |04 without affecting the position of the bell crank |27 or unlocking the table |04. When, however, the workpie is brought with the aid of the guide rollers onto the supporting table |04, the pin |3| reaches the upper end of the slot |30, and the further downward movement of the pedal 33causes raising of the hooked end |2'la, of the bell crank |21 and unlocking of the tooth |20, thereby permitting the table to be brought into its lower position by further application of pressure on the pedal 33 against the resistance `of the weight counterba-lancing the table |04.

Fig. 11 illustrates the workpiece H0 in' its operative position in Contact with the transfer belt 30, the table |04 being shown in its raised position. It will be understood that when the machine is running and the belt 30 continuously contacts the workpiece H0 which runs with its edge ||0a engaging the grooves la of the guid ing rollers III, motion ofthe belt itself lis suffi- `cient to move the workpiece around, Ythus effecting continuous printing of the design on the surface .of the workpiece. Because of the low friction of the workpiece on the guide rollers, the operator has only to support the workpiece to guide the same and to press the pedal for bringing the workpiece onto the table or breaking the contact between the transfer belt and the workpiece. When the printing operation is completed, the operator lowers the table by applying pressure on the pedal 33. When the pedal is locked in its lowermost position, the finished lworkpiece is removed from the machine and a new one inserted in :the manner described above.

Means are also provided to clean the transfer belt 3Q by removing the ink which may be left ,thereon after the printing. In the present embodiment of the invention said means are exemplified by a surface scraper i335 mounted on la shaft H36 journalled in a bracket ii'i secured to the vbracket EEES, see Figs. 3, 6 and 9. A rod f3.3 and a weight E39 are provided, just as in Ycases of other surface Scrapers employed in this machine, for the purpose of effecting desired ypressure on the scraped surface.

For cleaning the sides of the belt 35i, side Scrapers Mi! are provided, said Scrapers being hinged to their support mounted on the bracket itl, as shown in Fig 9, and pressed against the surface of the belt l3i) with the aid of springs itl. The ink scraped ci by the above described means is collected in a waste tank 16.2. A support roller ifi isprovided against the scraper E35 on the opposite side of the belt tt.A

The machine is provided with a switch box les for proper control of the motor whicnbox is connected with a power line in any suitable manner, preferably by an overhead connection.

A safety cover Hifi is provided for the belt 3l.

In order to permit convenient removal of the belt-,30, hook supports such as support U55 (see Fig. 4) may be provided for the rods of the Ipressure rollers in order to withdraw said rollers from contact with the belt. Similar supports may be provided for any weight carrying rod, if

desired.

Although a two-tone or two-color machine is described by way of example in the .present instance, it will now be clear in `View of the foregoing that more than two designs or color pati terns may be printed on a single workpiece in one operation with the use of machines embodying the present invention. .For constructing machines printing more than two designs it would only be necessary to provide the desired number of sub-assemblies including design and intermediate rollers, thus providing multiple color machines operating substantially the same as-the above described machine. It will be understood that the term design appearing in the claims is intended to be used in a generic sense to refer to a pattern regardless of the color or to a predetermined color regardless of the pattern and thatthe terms two-color and two-design are, unless otherwise stated, used interchangeably. Thus, where the phraseologyfirst and second designs is utilized this is construed to mean either two similar patterns in different colors or two different patterns in similar or different colors.

I claim:

1.'In a surface ornamenting machine, an endless pigment receiving belt adapted to'trans'fer the pigment to the surface of aworkpiecefa design-roller adapted'to transfer-dyeing pigment of one design to said belt, a second design roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment lof a second design, and an intermediate member adapted to receive the pigment from said second roller and to transfer it to said belt.

2. In a surface ornamenting machine, an endless pigment receiving belt adapted to Vtransfer the pigment to the surface of a workpiece, a design roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment of one design to said belt, a second design roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment of a second design, and an intermediate member adapted to receive the pigment from said second roller and to transfer it to said belt, said intermediate member being of substantially the same material or surface characteristic as said belt.

3. In a surface ornamenting machine, an endless pigment receiving belt adapted to trans,- fer the pigment to the surface of a workpiece, a design roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment of one design to said beit, a second design roller adapt-ed to transfer dyeing pigment of a second design, and an intermediate pigment receiving roller adapted to receive dyeing pigment from said second design roller and to .transfer in to said beit.

4. In a surface ornamenting machinaan endless pigment receiving belt adapted to transfer thedyeing pigment to the surface of a workpiece, a design Vroller yadapted to transfer ink of the first design or color to said pigment receiving belt, a pigment receiving member adapted to .receive ink of the second design or color and ,to transfer it by contact to said belt over said first design, and a second vdesign roller adapted to transfer ink of the second design or color to said pigment receiving member.

5. In a surface ornalnenting machine, an endless pigment receiving belt adapted to transfer by contact the received dyeing pigment to the surface of a workpiece, a design roller operatively mounted adjacent said belt and adapted to transfer thereto the Vink of the rst design, a pigment receivingroller adapted to contact said belt and to transfer thereto ink of the second design over the ink ofsaid first design, a second design roller mounted to contact said pigment receiving roller and to transfer thereunto the ink of the second design, andmeans Vfor effecting predetermined yielding pressures between said transfer belt and said first design roller and said belt and pigment receiving roller.

6. In a surface ornamenting machine, an endless pigment receiving vbelt adapted to transfer by Contact the received dyeing pigment tothe survface of a workpiece, a design roller operatively mounted adjacent said belt and adapted to transfer thereto the ink of the first design, a pigment receiving roller adaptedto contact said belt and to transferthereto ink of the second design over the ink of the first design, a second design roller mounted to Contact said pigment receiving roller and to transfer'thereonto the ink of the second design, andpressure rollers mounted to vContact said belt from the opposite side againstsaid first design roller and said pigment receiving roller, respectively, to exert predetermined yielding pressures thereon.

7. In a surface ornamenting machine, an endless `pigment receiving belt adapted 'to transfer lby contact the received dyeing pigment to Ithe surface of a-workpiece, a design roller operatively mounted adjacent said belt and adapted to-transfer thereto the ink of the first design, apigmpent receiving roller adapted to contact said belt and design,

to transfer thereto ink of the second design over the ink of said first design, a second design roller mounted to contact said pigment receiving roller and to transfer thereonto the ink of the second pressure rollers mounted to contact said belt from the opposite side against said rst design roller and said pigment receiving roller, respectively, the yieldable pressure to be exerted by said pressure rollers on said belt `and to control thereby the character of the respective designs tra-nsferred to said belt.

8. In a surface ornamenting machine, a pigment receiving belt adapted to transfer by contact the received dyeing pigment to the surface of a workpiece, a design roller, a pigment receiving roller adapted to contact said belt, and a second design roller adapted to ink said pigment receiving roller, separate means for supplying inks to said design rollers, adjustablemeans for independently varying the amount of ink actually transferred to said design rollers, and means for removing the ink from said pigment receiving roller, said means being arranged between the portions .of said roller contacting rst said belt and thereupon said design roller.

9. `In a surface ornamenting machine, a pigment receiving belt adapted to transfer by contact the received dyeing pigment to the surface of a workpiece, a design roller, a pigment receiv- ,4

ing roller adapted to contact said belt, and a second design roller adapted to ink said pigment receiving roller, separate means for supplying inks to said design rollers, adjustable means for independently varying the amount of ink actually transferred to said design rollers, scraper means for removing the ink from the pigment receiving roller, said scraper means being located to scrape the ink from portions around the periphery of said pigment receiving roller after said portions successively contact said belt but before a particular portion comes in contact with said second design roller.

10. In a surface `ornamenting machine, an ink receiving belt having a smooth surface and adapted to transfer by contact the received ink to the surface to be decorated; a first roller having an engraved surface and adapted to transfer ink from its engraved surface directly to the smooth surface of said belt; an intermediate roller having a smooth ink receiving surface, said intermediate roller adapted to engage the surface of said belt and to transfer thereon to the received ink; and a second roller having an engraved surface and adapted to transfer by contact ink to the surface of said intermediate roller.

l1. In a surface ornamenting machine, a movable pigment receiving member adapted to transfer the pigment to the surface of a workpiece, a design roller adapted to transfer dyeing and adjustable Weights for regulating pigment of one design to said member, a second design roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment of a second design, and an intermediate member adapted to receive the pigment from said second roller and to transfer it to said member.

12. In a surface ornamenting machine, a movable pigment receiving member adapted to transfer the pigment to the surface of a workpiece, a design roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment of one design to said member, a second design roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment of a second design, an intermediate member adapted to receive the pigment from said second roller and to transfer it to said member, and means for relatively varying the pressures between said pigment receiving member, said first inking roller and said intermediate member.

13. In a method of decorating a surface with a multiple-tone design, the steps of printing the design of the first tone directly on a pigment receiving member, printing the designs of each succeeding tone on a separate pigment receiving member, transferring said succeeding designs on said rst pigment receiving member one after another over said rst design, and thereupon transferring all of said design to the surface to be decorated by bringing the same into contact with said first member.

14. In a method of decorating a surface with I a two-tone design, the steps of printing the detransferring by contact said second design from said second pigment receiving member to said first pigment receiving member over said first design, and thereupon transferring both of said designs to the surface to be decorated.

15. In a method of decorating a curved surface with a two-tone design, the steps of printing the design of the rst tone directly on a soft pigment receiving member, printingvthe design of the second tone on a smooth surface pigment receiving member, transferring by contact said second design from said second pigment receiving member to said first pigment receiving member over said first design, and thereupon transferring both of said designs to the surface to be decorated by bringing said surface into contact with said soft member.

16. In a surface ornamenting machine, an endless pigment receiving member adapted to transfer the pigment to the surface of a workpiece, a design roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment of one design to said member, a second design roller adapted to transfer dyeing pigment of a second design, and an intermediate pigment receiving roller adapted to receive dyeing pigment from said second design roller and to transfer it to said pigment receiving member.

NICHOLAS G. KOPPINGER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4771687 *Dec 31, 1986Sep 20, 1988Usg CorporationBelt transfer printing of nonplanar articles
US5162119 *Apr 9, 1991Nov 10, 1992Nabisco, Inc.Printing and forming apparatus for making printed baked goods
US5534281 *Nov 23, 1994Jul 9, 1996Nabisco, Inc.Method of making printed baked goods
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/175, 101/177, 101/154, 101/211, 101/36
International ClassificationB05C9/00, B05C9/02
Cooperative ClassificationB05C9/022
European ClassificationB05C9/02B