Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2281022 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 28, 1942
Filing dateAug 1, 1940
Priority dateAug 1, 1940
Publication numberUS 2281022 A, US 2281022A, US-A-2281022, US2281022 A, US2281022A
InventorsJoseph Cavanaugh Thomas
Original AssigneeJoseph Cavanaugh Thomas
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shade construction
US 2281022 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1941v T. J. CAVANAUGH 2,281,022

SHADE CONSTRUCTION Filed Aug. 1, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. Mona-5 J. aqvnuauq r-J.

AT RNEY p 1942- T. J. CAVANAUGH 2,281,022

SHADE CONS TRUCTION Filed Aug. 1, 1940 Q 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 @7 5 E P25 150 ]:1 I \fao 2w it? 252 220 234 EMU 15;;11

INVENTOR mamas J cqvewr-wax-j.

ATTORN EY Patented Apr. 28, 1942 UNITED. STATES PATENT OFFICE snaps CONSTRUCTION Thomas Joseph Cavanaugh, Detroit, Mich. Application August 1, 1910, Serial No. 349,324 11 Claims. (01. 156 -10) curtain overlapping another part thereof, to-

gether with means for adjusting one part of the curtain relative to another so as to bring the translucent areas of thecurtain into or out of registry for the purpose of controlling the passage of light through th opening in which the curtain is hung. In the embodiment in which the translucent areas of the curtain are provided by apertures formed in the curtain, the passage of air through the opening will also be controlled by such adjustment.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved form of mechanism for supporting and manipulating the shade construction of the type heretofore referred to.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from a consideration of the following specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which there are two sheets and wherein:

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of a shade construction embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view of Fig. 1, taken along the staggered line 2-2 thereof ;v

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of a part of the construction illustrated in Fig. 1 and taken along the line 33 thereof;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the control or adjusting mechanism of the construction illustrated in Fig. 1; v

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary elevational view of a modification of Fig. 1 and illustrating another form of control or adjusting mechanism therefor;

Fig. 6 is a side elevation of the construction illustrated in Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a front elevational view of a further modification of Fig. 1;

Fig. 8 is a side elevation of the shade construction shown in Fig. '7 and taken along line 6-8 thereof;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the adjusting. mechanism of the construction illustrated in Fig. 7; l

Fig. 10 is a front elevational view of another modification of Fig. 1;

Fi 11 is a side elevational view of construction illustrated in Fig. 10; and

Fig. 12 is an enlarged sectional view of the spring operated roller illustrated in Fig. 2.

Referring now to Figs. 1 to 4 and 12, inclusive, an opening, such as a window, indicated the shade and defined by the dotted line 20, is provided with a shade construction comprising the customary I spring-operated roller 22 and a curtain, shade or screen 24, one end of which is connected to the roller 22 so as to permit the curtain 24 to be wound upon and unwound from the roller 22, the other end of the screen 24 being secured adjacent the roller 22 suchrfor instance, as by being connected to another roller 26. Each of the rollers 22 and 26 is independently mounted for rotation in conventional shade roller brackets 28 which are secured to the frame defining the opening 20. The roller 26 is free to turn in either direction of rotation, except as hereinafter described, while the roller 22 includes the conventional spring 23 therein which tends to rotate the roller 22 so as to wind the curtain 24 thereon. As is well known in the art, the spring 23 of the roller 22 may be caught in any one of a plurality of positions for preventing the roller 22 from winding the curtain 24 thereon.

The shade construction further includes a free roller 10 engaging the curtain 24 between the rollers 22 and 26, said roller 30 being supported by the curtain 24 and acting as a weight to hold the curtain '24 in a U-shaped form as the same is raised and lowered. A bar 32 is journaled on the ends of the roller 30 and is provided with a ring 24 which serves as a handle so as to permit manual raising and lowering of the curtain 24.

One end of roller 26 may be provided with a groove 36, in which one end of an endless cord 36 is confined, while its other end passes over pulley 40 iournaled on pin 4| which is secured to the side of the opening 20. Movement of cord 38 is adapted to rotate roller 26, which will effect winding of one end of curtain 24 thereon or unwinding of one end of the curtain 24 therefrom, depending on the direction in which rotation of the roller 26 occurs. Pulley 40 has a sufficiently tight fit upon pin 4| so as to hold cord 38 and roller 26 against movement due to thegravitational pull of the curtain 24 on roller 26.

Throughout the length thereof, curtain 24 is provided with alternate translucent and opaque areas, the translucent areas in the case of the modification illustrated in Figs. 1 to 4 being provided by a series of spaced apertures 42 formed in the curtain 24. The apertures 42 may be the pulley 40 which are operatively associated with the secondary roller 26.

Referring to Fig. 1, it will be observed that the apertures 42 in that part or the curtain 24 between the roller 26 and the roller 30 are not in registry with the apertures 42 in that part of the curtain lying between the roller 30 and the spring-operated roller 22. In this position the curtain 24 will not pass light through the opening. in which the curtain is arranged, and the passage of air through the opening also will be restricted. Manipulation of the cord 38 to eifect rotation of the roller 26 will wind a part of the curtain .24 thereon and thereby bring the apertures 42 in one part of the curtain 24 into registry with the apertures 42 in the other part thereof, thereby permitting the passage of light through the translucent areas in the curtain.

It will be appreciated, of course, that the cord 38 may beadjusted any desired amount so as to bring the apertures 42 into partial or complete registry. V

A modified form ofadjusting mechanism for the shade construction illustrated in Fig. l 'is illustrated in Figs-5 and 6 and comprises a cord 44, one end of which is connected to the bar 32 and the other end of which is connected to a drum 46 and wound thereon. .The drum 46 is mounted for rotation in bracket 48 and is provided with a crank 50 by means of which the cord 44 may be wound upon or unwound from the drum 48. Winding of the cord 44 further upon the drum 46 will further pull down the curtain 24 and will eventually bring the apertures 42 and 44 in the oppositely arranged parts thereof into registry. Preferably, the drum 46 is so mounted in the bracket 48 so that the drum 46 will remain in whatever position it is set by the crank 60..

In the modification illustrated in Figs. '1, 8 and 9, the same shade construction as that illustrated in Fig. 1 is employed, but the parts are reversely arranged. In this modification, the spring-operated roller I22 is supported by a bracket I32 which also has the secondary roller I26 rotatably supported therein. The roller I30 is journaled in-brackets I28 affixed to the frame defining the window opening I20, and the curtain- I24, one end of which is connected to the spring-operated roller I22, passes over the roller I30 and has its other end connected to the roller adapted to be manually operated, and when this is done, one end of the curtain I24. will be wound upon or unwound from the 'roller I28, depending upon the direction of rotation, and this rotation will adjust the apertures I42 in one part of the screen or curtain I24 with respect to the apertures I42 in the other part thereof, so as to bring such apertures into or out of resistry for the purpose of controlling the passage of light through the curtain I24.

In the modification illustrated in Figs. 10 and 11, a curtain 224 has one end connected to a spring-operated roller 222 and passes over a roller 280, the other end 221 of the curtain 224 having connected to it a cord 244 which passes through eyes 246 suitably secured to the frame defining the opening 220, and the end of the cord 244 is adapted to be wound upon the hook 248 soasto secure the end 221 of the curtain in position. Manipulation-of the cord 244 will effect the lowering or raising of the end 221 of the curtain 224. The curtain 224 may be formed of a transparent material and have opaque areas 243 formed thereon. The translucent areas are indicated by the reference character 242. The roller 230 is provided with a bar 232 similar to'the bar 32 and having a ring 234 which may be grasped, for effecting the raising or lowering of the curtain 224 in the opening 220.

.While the curtain 224 will pass light when the translucent areas 242 are in registry, this curtain will not pass air as do the curtains illustrated in the other modifications, due to the fact that the curtain 224 is constructed of a material which is impervious to the passage of air under ordinary atmospheric conditions. Of course, the curtain 224 may be provided with openings like the openings 42 in the construction illustrated in Fig. 1, if desired. Similarly, a curtain having the construction illustrated at 224 may be employed in the other modifications in lieu of the curtains therein illustrated.

The roller 222 is mounted for rotation in brackets 228 affixed to the frame defining the opening 220. The opaque areas 243 formed on the curtain 224 throughout the length thereof and alternately arranged with respect to a translucent area 242 may be provided by painting or pasting dark strips across the curtain 224 throughout the length thereof and at regularly spaced intervals.

I26. As the bracket I32 is lowered or raised in the opening I20, the curtain I 24 is adapted to be wound upon or unwound from the spring-operated roller I22. The construction of the curtain I24 may be exactly like that of the curtain 24 illustrated in Fi 1.

In the modification illustrated in Figs. '1, 8 and 9, one end of the roller I26 has a wheel I40 connected thereto, so as ,to rotate therewith, such wheel being arranged externally of the bracket. I32. Aspring I4I arranged between one end of the bracket I32 and the wheel I4 il.prevents accidental rotation thereof. Wheel I40 18 While the invention has been described with some detail, it is to be understood that the description is for the purpose of illustration only and is not definitive of the limits of the inventive idea. The right is reserved to make such.

changes in the details of construction and: ar-

rangement of parts as will fall within the purview of the attached claims.

Iclaim:

1. Shade construction comprising 1 a springoperated roller, a shade adapted to be wound on said roller and having one end secured thereto, means securing the other end of said shade-adjacent said spring-operated roller, a second roller engaging said shade intermediate the ends thereof, one of said rollers being supported by said shade and being movable toward and away from the other of said rollers for efiecting the winding of said shade upon and the unwinding of;-said shade from said spring-operated roller,s'aid shade when unwound from said spring-operated roller assuming a U-shaped form, said shade being constructed so as to provide alternate translucent and opaque areas along the length thereof, and manually operable means acting on said shade for adjusting the length of the unwound part of said shade without displacing the same from its normal path of travel for selectively effecting the alignment or disalignment of translucent areas in opposing portions of said shade for controlling the passage of light through said shade.

2. Shade construction comprising a springoperated roller mounted for rotation but against vertical movement adjacent one end of an opening, a shade adapted to be wound on said roller and having one end secured thereto, means securing the other end of said shade adjacent said roller, a second roller engaging said shade intermediate the ends thereof, said second roller being supported by said shade and being movable toward and away from the other of said rollers for effecting the winding of said shade upon and,

the unwinding of said curtain from said springoperated roller, said shade when unwound from said spring-operated roller assuming a U-shaped form, said shade being constructed so as to provide alternate translucent and opaque areas along the length thereof, and manually operable means carried by said second roller and depending below said shade for effecting the winding of part of the shade upon or unwinding of part of the shade from said spring-operated roller for selectively effecting the alignment or disalignment of translucent areas in opposing portions of said shade for controlling the passage of light through said shade. v

3. Shade construction comprising a springoperated roller, a shade adapted to be wound on said rollerand having one end secured thereto,

means securing the other end of said shade adjacent said roller, a second roller engaging said shade intermediate the ends threeof, one of said rollers being supported by said shade and being movable toward and away from the other of said rollers for effecting the winding of said shade upon and the unwinding of said shade from said spring-operated roller, said shade when unwound from said spring-operated roller assuming a U- shaped form, said shade being constructed so as to provide alternate translucent and opaque areas along the length thereof, and means for vertically moving that part of said shade on the side of said second roller remote from said springoperated roller relative to that part of said shade on the other side thereof for selectively effecting the alignment or disalignment of translucent areas in said parts for controlling the passage of light through said shade.

4. Shade construction comprising a springoperated roller, a shade adapted to be wound on said roller and having one end secured thereto, a second roller arranged alongside -said springoperated roller and having the other end of said shade connected thereto, means engaging said shade intermediate the ends thereof and being grelatively movable toward and away from said rollers for effecting the winding of said shade upon and the unwinding of said shade from said spring-operated roller, said shade when unwound assuming a U-shaped form and being constructed so as to provide alternate translucent and opaque areas along the length thereof, and manually op-' erable means for winding part of said shade upon said second roller for selectively effecting the alignment or disalignment of translucent areas in mounted for rotation but against vertical movement adjacent one end of an opening, a shade adapted to be wound upon said spring-operated roller and connected at its other end to the other of said rollers, means engaging said shade intermediate the ends thereof and being relatively movable toward and away from said rollers for effecting the winding of said shade upon and the unwinding of said shade from said spring-operated roller, said shade being constructed so as to provide alternate translucent and opaqueareas along the length thereof, said other of said rollers having associated therewith means for rotatingthe same so as to wind part of the shade thereon for selectively effecting the alignment or disalignment of translucent areas in opposing portions of said shade for regulating the passage of light through said translucent areas.

6. Shade construction comprising a springoperated roller, a shade adapted to be wound on said roller. means for securing the other end of said shade in a position adjacent said springoperated roller, means engaging said shade intermediate the ends thereof and being relatively movable toward and away from said roller for effecting the winding of said shade upon and the unwinding of said shade from said roller, said curtain being constructed so as to provide alternate translucent and opaque areas along the length thereof, and means other than the winding of part of said shade on said spring-operated roller for eiiecting adjustment of one part of said shade relative to another part thereof without displacing said shade from its normal path of travel for selectively effecting the alignment or disalignment of translucent areas in oppositely arranged portions thereof for regulating the passage of light therethrough.

'7. Shade construction comprising a pringoperated roller, a shade connected at one end thereof to said roller and adapted to be wound thereon, said shade when unwound from said roller having its other end folded back so as to arrange the shade in a U-shaped form, said shade being constructed so as to provide alter nate translucent and opaque areas along the length thereof, and means associated with said other end of saidshade for adjusting the effective length of the shade for selectively effecting the alignment or disalignment of translucent areas in oppositely arranged portions thereof for controlling the passage of light through said shade. 1

8. Shade construction comprising a springoperated roller, a shade having one end secured thereto and adapted to be wound thereon, an adjusting roller arranged alongside of said spring-operated roller and having the other end of said shade connected thereto, a roller engaging said shade intermediate the ends thereof and supported thereby, said last-mentioned roller being adapted to maintain said shade in a U- shaped form when the same is unwound from said spring-operated roller, said shade being provided with alternate translucent and opaque areas along the length thereof, and adjusting opposing portions of said shade for controlling mechanism comprising a pulley and an endless cord passing over said pulley and said adjusting roller, said roller which engages the shade intermediate the ends thereof having a bar journaled to the ends thereof and arranged below said shade, said bar forming a means by which the effective length of the shade may be manually adjusted.

9. Shade construction comprising a springoperated roller, a shade having one end thereof affixed to said roller and adapted to be wound thereon, means for securing the other end of said shade adjacent said roller, another roller engaging said shade intermediate the ends thereof and supported thereby, said last-mentioned roller being adapted to maintain said shade in a U-shaped form when the same is unwound from said spring-operated roller and having trunnions at the ends thereof, a bar having its ends journaled on said trunnions and arranged below said shade, said shade being provided with alternate translucent and opaque areas throughout the length thereof, and adjusting mechanism for effecting the registration or the translucent areas in said shade on one side of'said other roller with the translucent areas in said shade on the other side of said other roller comprising a rotary drum, a cord adapted to be wound on said drum and having one end afilxed to said bar, and means for rotating said drum so as to wind said cord thereon.

10. Shade construction comprising a springoperated roller, a shade having one end secured thereto and adapted to be wound thereon, means associated with the other end of said shade for securing the same adjacent said spring-operated roller, a secondary roller engaging said shade intermediate the ends thereof and supported thereby, whereby to maintain said shade when unwound from said spring-operated roller in a U-shaped vform, a bar having its ends secured to the ends of said secondary rollerand extending rollers, one of which is spring-operated, a shade having one end thereof connected to said springoperated roller and adapted to be wound thereon, said shade passing over the other of said rollers and having its other end movably secured adjacent said spring-operated roller and so that one part of the shade is arranged generally parallel to and opposite to another part of said shade, said shade being provided with alternate translucent and opaque areas throughout the length thereof, and means by which the efiective length of the unwound part of the shade may be varied without displacing part of the shade from its normal path of travel for selectively effecting the alignment or disalignment of translucent areas in oppositely arranged portions of said shade for controlling the passage of light therethrougli.

THOMAS JOSEPH CAVANAUGH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2461870 *Jul 13, 1944Feb 15, 1949Safety Car Heating & LightingWindow shade construction
US2530218 *Apr 22, 1946Nov 14, 1950Safety Car Heating & LightingWindow shade construction
US2716310 *Nov 28, 1952Aug 30, 1955Pangborn CorpBlasting apparatus
US2968419 *May 21, 1959Jan 17, 1961Molins Machine Co LtdWork trays for cigarette factories
US2970643 *Oct 22, 1956Feb 7, 1961Helen Jane AdamskyWindow shade
US3128688 *Jun 12, 1962Apr 14, 1964Coda AlfredPhotographic background roller assembly
US3289738 *Aug 31, 1964Dec 6, 1966B & N Mfg Co IncWindow assembly
US3701376 *Dec 23, 1969Oct 31, 1972GriesserDevice for slide-shifting and winding twin vertical screens or blades
US3789904 *Jan 15, 1973Feb 5, 1974Takazawa IDouble curtain device
US4290473 *Jan 24, 1979Sep 22, 1981Queen's University At KingstonApparatus for controlling light transmission through a window
US5168647 *May 30, 1991Dec 8, 1992Castro Jose LMap display and holder device
US5358025 *Feb 26, 1993Oct 25, 1994Cliff WoodFabric garage enclosure
US5752557 *Jul 22, 1996May 19, 1998Hired-Hand Manufacturing, Inc.Sealable curtain
US5819835 *Sep 20, 1995Oct 13, 1998Draper Shade & Screen Co., Inc.For use in a room including a floor
US6138739 *Jan 15, 1999Oct 31, 2000Grant W. CriderPortal covering
US6189592 *Oct 18, 1999Feb 20, 2001Harmonic Design, Inc.Roll up shade doubled fabric having patterns thereon
US6651720 *Apr 5, 2000Nov 25, 2003Disilvestro EarnestDual panel window shade apparatus
US7174940 *Oct 20, 2004Feb 13, 2007Leslie NienRoller blind structure
US7849907 *Jul 5, 2006Dec 14, 2010Wintec Korea Inc.Multiple choice shade system
US8245444Oct 13, 2010Aug 21, 2012Moshe KonstantinLight-control assembly
US8256488 *Nov 16, 2009Sep 4, 20123Form, Inc.Collapsible light-weight perforated partition
US8646509 *Jun 29, 2011Feb 11, 2014Chen-Ho ChuBlind with looped blind sheet for adjusting opacity
US20090308545 *Jan 3, 2008Dec 17, 2009Eun Ro AnRolling device for roll blind
US20120000617 *Jun 29, 2011Jan 5, 2012Chen-Ho ChuBlind with looped blind sheet for adjusting opacity
DE3743031A1 *Dec 18, 1987Jun 8, 1989Acker Textilwerk GmbhArrangement for altering radiation transmission
EP1904710A1 *Jul 5, 2006Apr 2, 2008Wintec Korea Inc.Multiple choice shade system
EP2440734A1 *Jun 10, 2010Apr 18, 2012Erco Systems AktiebolagA shade device
WO1994015508A1 *Dec 24, 1993Jul 21, 1994Ass Marinus T J VanA light-transmitting screen
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/85, 160/237, 160/254
International ClassificationE06B9/40, A47H23/06, E06B9/24, A47H23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47H23/06, E06B9/40
European ClassificationA47H23/06, E06B9/40