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Publication numberUS2282293 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 5, 1942
Filing dateApr 21, 1941
Priority dateApr 21, 1941
Publication numberUS 2282293 A, US 2282293A, US-A-2282293, US2282293 A, US2282293A
InventorsFrank Christenson
Original AssigneeFrank Christenson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat insulating lining
US 2282293 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 5, 1942. F. cHRlsTENsoN v2,282,293

1 "HEAT INSULATING LI-NING Filed April 21, 1941 Patented May 5, 1942' UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 3 Claims.

This invention relates to a heat insulating lining for ducts, tanks, ovens, furnaces, :dues or other metal surfaces which are subject to expansionA and contraction due to changes of temperature.

An object of the invention is to prvide a heat insulating lining of the above typehaving a facing of monolithic cement supported on an insulating blanket in such a manner that cracking of the cement due toiexpansion or contraction of the underlying metal surface is prevented.

Another object is to provide a simple, conyfvenient and efiicient heat insulating lining o the above type.

Various other objects and advantages will be apparent as the nature of the invention is more fully disclosed. s

Although the novel features which are believed 'to be characteristic of this invention are pointed out more particularly in the claims appended hereto, the invention itself may be better understood by referring to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing in which a specific embodiment thereof has been set forth for purposes of illustration.

In the drawing: I Fig. 1 is la broken perspective view illustrating a lining embodying the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a transverse section showing the construction of the lining, and

Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail view showing the .construction of the insulating blanket.

Referring tothe drawing more in detail the invention is shown as applied to a wall I which may comprise a portion of a wall of a duct, tank, oven, furnace, iiue or other metal surface which is subject to expansion or contraction and which isto be heat insulated. The wall IB is shown as made of sheet metal and is provided with a plurality of pins Il which are secured thereto by suitable means such as welding and act as securing for the blanket I2 of heat insulating mate rial to be described.

The blanket vI 2 of heat insulating material may comprise a layer Il of brous insulating material such as mineral wool, rock wool, S188 wool, asbestos or the like, held by a wire screen I4 which extends around the entire blanket with overlapping ends I5 which may be secured by suitable means such as a wire I6 which is threaded therethrough. The blanket is thus self supporting and may be handled and applied as a unit. Wire pins or rivets 2l having heads 2|, Fig. 3, are

are secured by washers 22 which may be adapted to snap over projections 23 formedon the pins 20.

In applying the insulating lining to the wall I 0 in accordance with the present invention, the pins I I are welded to the metal wall and are bent into upstanding position. The insulating blanket I2 is then applied thereover, in such a manner that the pins I I pierce the same and exl tend therethrough. The Yprojecting ends IIaof said' pins are then bent over the outer surface of the blanket I2 for holding the same in place. A support for the cement, such as a layer 24 of expanded metal, or of other suitable` metal lath, is then applied over the surface of the blanket I2 and the projecting ends 20a of the pins 20 are bent thereover to hold the same in place. An outer llayer 26 of monolithic castable cement is then applied and is held in position by the layer 24 of expanded metal.

In the above-mentioned construction'the pins II which are secured to the wall I0 do not contact or enter into the cement 26 and the pins 20 which hold the expanded metal layer 24 in place are not anchored to the wall `I0 but are.

free for relative movement as the wall expands or contracts. Consequently, movement of the pins II is not transmitted to the cement layer 25 and does not produce cracks therein, but is f taken up by the flexibility of the blanket itself. The structure above described provides a brous blanket having high heat insulating properties coated with a monolithic cement which is l is to be limited only in accordance with the foll lowing claims.

What is claimed is:

l. An insulating lining for a metal wall which is subject to expansion and contraction. comprising metal pins attached to the surface of said metal wall and extending Ioutwardlytherefrom,

passed through the layer I 3 andscreen I4 and 55 an insulating blanket on said wall and secured by said pins, additional pins extending through said blanket and secured thereto, said additional pins being free of said wall and adapted to move independently thereof, a layer of supporting material adapted to support a layer of cement, said additional pins extending through said layer of supporting material and securins the same to said blanket, and a layer oi cement covering said layer of supporting material and carried thereby, said ilrst pins being free for relative movement with respect to said layer of cement whereby expansion or contraction of said metal wall may take place without cracking said layer of cement.A

2. An insulating lining'for a metal wall which is subject to expansion and contraction, comblanket and secured thereto, said additional pins` being free of said wall and adapted to move independently thereof, a layer of expanded metal adapted to support a layer oi' cement, said additional pins extending through said layer of expanded metal and securing the same to said blanket, Aand a layer of cement covering said layer of expanded metal and-carried thereby,

aesaa v said iirst pins being free for relative movement with respect to said layer of cement whereby expansion or contraction of said metal wall may take place without cracking said layer of cement.

3. An insulating lining for a metal wall which is subject to expansion and contraction, comprising an insulating blanket on said wall, said blanket comprising a -layer of iibrous insulating material and a wire screen attached to the same to make a self supportingy unit, pins attached to said wall extending through said blanket and bent over to secure the same in place, a layer oi expanded metal over said blanket, additional pins extending through and secured in said blankt and bent over said expanded metal to hold the same in placeanda layer of cement covering said expanded metal and carried thereby, said first pins' being free for relative movement with respect to said layer of cementwhereby expansion or contraction of said metal wall maytake place without cracking saidv layer oi cement, g

said additional pins being free o! said wall and adapted to move independently thereof.

FRANK crmIsTENsoN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2460848 *Jul 14, 1944Feb 8, 1949Foster Wheeler CorpInsulating blanket
US2564497 *Nov 26, 1947Aug 14, 1951Gen ElectricCombustion chamber liner
US2705414 *Mar 16, 1949Apr 5, 1955Laclede Christy CompanyWall construction
US2889698 *Jul 28, 1951Jun 9, 1959Babcock & Wilcox CoInsulated furnace wall
US3016999 *Oct 28, 1959Jan 16, 1962Thorpe Insulation CompanyInsulated structure
US3032150 *May 29, 1959May 1, 1962Rohr Aircraft CorpHeat insulating panel and method of making same
US3156972 *Apr 28, 1961Nov 17, 1964Johns ManvilleMethod for relining a combustion chamber with refractory material without disassembling the chamber
US3272609 *Dec 1, 1961Sep 13, 1966Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpFeeder for producing fibers
US3316685 *Jul 25, 1962May 2, 1967Universal Oil Prod CoMethod for anchoring a concrete type of covering to a metal wall section with multiple anchor strip means
US3579802 *Dec 2, 1968May 25, 1971Frank R GajovskiMethod for insulating boiler or like housing wall
US3770557 *Oct 23, 1970Nov 6, 1973Ford Motor CoHigh temperature insulation
US4439960 *Oct 30, 1981Apr 3, 1984Owens-Corning Fiberglas CorporationComposite insulation panel
US6755218 *Oct 7, 2002Jun 29, 2004Royal Group Technologies LimitedDuct wrap securing system
DE1015651B *Nov 3, 1952Sep 12, 1957Nils Helge Willy HellstroemMontagefertige Waermeisolierhuelle fuer Rohrleitungen od. dgl.
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/347, 52/543, 52/409
International ClassificationF16L59/02, E04B1/76
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/76, F16L59/029
European ClassificationE04B1/76, F16L59/02G