Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2282318 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1942
Filing dateNov 20, 1940
Priority dateNov 20, 1940
Publication numberUS 2282318 A, US 2282318A, US-A-2282318, US2282318 A, US2282318A
InventorsLlewellyn Biggs
Original AssigneeAmerican Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fiber can treating machine
US 2282318 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 12, 1.942.

1... Buses 2,282,318

' FIBER GAN TREATING MACHINE Filed Nov. 20.j 1940 4 Sheets-Sheet l vINVENTOR BY o0 ATTORNEYS May 12, 1942. l.. Blass 2,282,318

' FIBER CAN TREATING MACHINE Filed Nov. 20, 1940 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Eig 2 i, 55,

26 INVENTOR.

May 12, 1942. Bless 2,282,318

FIBER GAN TREATING MACHINE l Filed Nov. 2o. 1940 4 sheets-sheet s AT-roreevs Y May 12, 1942.

l.. Bic-:Gs y

FIBER CAN TREATING MACHINE Filed NOV. 20, 1940 4 Sheets-'Sheet 4 y ATTogNevs Patented May 12, 1942 FIBER. CAN TREATING MACHINE Llewellyn Biggs, Leonia, N. J., assignor to American Can Company, New 'Yon-lr,l N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application November 2 6 Claims.

The present invention relates to a ilber can treating machine kand has particular reference to an apparatus which operates on a ber container or can for temporarily holding a hinged closure element in closed position in the top wall of 'the can.

In a fiber container of the type disclosed in the John M. Hothersall Patent 2,085,979, issued by the United States PatentA Ofllce on July 6, 1937, the empty can is temporarily sealed or closed byv insertion of a drawn plug closure element. Such sealed condition is maintained until the container is to be filled with its contents.v

This is a sanitary measure taken to insure against contamination of the contents which in the. case ofthe said patent is milk or milk products.

The present invention embodies a simple high speed apparatus which functions to more positively keep such anl empty ilber container temporarily closed until it is timev to illl it with its contents and this invention contemplates a slight reforming of certain parts of the inserted closure element -for that purpose.v

An object of the present invention'is the provision of an apparatus having mechanism for continuously advancing empty containers with hinged closure elements through an expanding operation during which time the inserted closure elements are temporarily fastened in substantially secure holding position.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an apparatus of the character described which embodies a rotatable turret for receiving'and for holding the containers in certain positions during their. travel so that the closure element of each container is reshaped to more positively hold it in can closing position. I

Another object of the invention is thejprovi V"ferent containers may be treated at the same time and while they are being continuously ad- 4yanced by the turret.

Numerous othery objects andjad'vantages of the v'ention will be apparent as it is better underofodu'fromvthe following description, which, ta-

kjenjinn'connection with the accompanying drawngs. discloses a preferred `embodiment thereof.

eferring to the drawings:

Figuijel is a plan sectional view of an appara- 4tus''eml'oodying the present invention and show.- .ing the empty closed containers being advanced and operated on to effect vthe desired holding `of the"` closure elements; I l Fig. 2 is a 'vertical transverse sectional view taken substantially along the broken'section line 2 2 in Fig. 1; 4

Fig.l 3 is a similar view taken at right angles, that is, along the section line 3-3 in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the broken line 4 4 in Fig. 2 and showing in top plan the containers being advanced by the turret of the apparatus;

Fig. 5 is a face view on an enlarged scale of one set of expanding devices and showing partly in section a container and its closure member, the positions of the parts being such as to disclose the effect of the reforming or expanding operation on the closure element, parts being broken away;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged perspective view of the upper part of the closed empty container after its closure element has been treated in the present apparatus;

Fig. 7 is a transverse vertical sectional view' taken along the broken line 1-1 in Fig. 4 and showing certain operating details; and

Fig. 8 is a combined section and side elevation drawn to the same scale as Fig. 'I and viewed substantially along the line 8-8 in Fig. 1, this view showing one of the expanding units, parts being broken away.

For the purpose of exemplifying the invention in a concrete form, the drawings illustrate an apparatus which may be a part oi.' a larger machine. This apparatus is particularly adapted to treating a fiber container just after `it has been fabricated. Where such a container is for holding milk as in the aforesaid Hothersall patent, the wax coating step has just been completed. Accordingly, the drawings disclose the fully formed and coated containers being brought in by a feed conveyor which may be a part of the same conveyor used to conduct the cans through theprevious coating step. I

To this end, Figs. 1 and 2 show a feed conveyor A which carries a series of equally spaced can cages B, each cage being adapted for holding one iiber container a having a top wall b and a hinge closure element c secured to the top as for example by a hinge staple d (see also Fig. 6). The conveyor A brings the containers a to a rotatable turret C which has a series of spaced can receiving pockets D (see also Fig. 4).

A transfer device E associated with each turret pocket D is used for liftingthe container a from its cage B and for positioning it in "its corresponding turret pocket. Such a transfer device thus properly locates the can within its turret pocket for the expanding operation.

This transfer of the can a from conveyor A to the turret C is accomplished without diminution of the c an travel, the can after being received Vwithin the turret moving around a circular path` of travel through about 225. At the end of this travel it is deposited on adischarge belt'F (Figs. 1 and 2). This belt removes it from the apparatus.

the parts together prior to the filling of the can.

are furthe supported by rollers, as best illustrated in Fig. 2.

As to this feature each cage B adjacent the top of its arm 28, carries a pin 4|. A roller 421 is rotatably mounted on the pin. At the bottom, this vertical arm carries a pin 43 ony which a roller 44 is rotatably mounted.

An upper grooved track 45 (see also Fig. 1) is disposed above theupper roller 42 .which travels along the grooved lower edge of the track or guide rail. 'In a similar manner a lower track or guide rail 46 is carried on the frame of the machine and is formed in its upper surface with a groove in which the roller 44 rotatesv during advancement of the chain. .This construction definitely retains the various cages in proper holding posican may be opened easily by lifting the plug part from its seat.

The formation of the lugs f is effected by an expanding device G, best illustrated in Figs. 5 and 8. Each expanding device-includes a pair of. expanding fingers and there is one such device for each turret pocket. The expanding fingers are carried in the upper part of the turret assembly and above the associated turret pocket. The lower ends of the fingers are in such a position as to be received intothe depressed plugsection e ofthe closure c. when the can is lifted in its pocket by the transfer and lifting device E. Since each container within la turret pocket has its ownexpanding device G, the diii'erent ex.,

panding operations on different containers are taking place in various stages as they traverse the 225 degrees of circular travel with the turret.

The feed conveyor A (Figs. 1 and 2) preferably consists of chain links 2| and this'chain operates in a horizontal plane by passing over suitable horizontally disposed sprockets mounted on verticalshafts. This feature is shown only frag-- mentarily in the drawings, that part of the chain which extends into the present apparatus taking "over a sprocket 22 which is mounted on a vertical shaft 23. Thisfshaft is .iournaled in bearings 24, 25` formed in a casing 26-which constitutes the main frame of the apparatus.

, Every other chain link 2I supports a cage B,` each alternate link of the chain beingl used as a the upperend of the container a in proper posiv tion withinvthe cage. At the lower end each vertically disposed arm 28 extends down at an angle and spreads out on b oth sides to form a closed hollow angular base 3|.

When the containers a come into the apparatus each container rests upon its associated base member 3|. It is disposed in an angular position, as to its base relation to the conveyor, beingso held by projections 32 formed on each laterally extending finger 28 of the individual cage member. The container is vin` an yupright position at such time, its inner corner sliding along a vpair of horizontally disposed guide rails 35 which are secured to a wallv 36 of 1the frame 26. During this straight travel of the containers with the` conveyor chain, the cages Bv va. bearing65 formed in a cover tion and insures passage of the closed empty container 'a into the apparatus.

The rotatable turret C (Figs. 2 and 4) comprises a turret hub 5| which supports upper' and lower turret plates 52.- The turret pockets D are cut in the peripheryof the two turret plates 52. The plate edges of the pockets are in vertical alignment to provide a proper holding surface forthe container a which is received lin to the turret from the conveyor A.. V

The turret C is mounted on a vertical shaft 53 which is journaled at its lower end in a bearing 54 formed in the lower wall ofthe frame 26. The shaft adjacent its upper end isals journaledgin late 56 which is bolted tothe upper wall of th frame 26.` IIfhe shaft 53 is vrotated in anysuitable mannerin time with. the rotation of the sprocket 221over which the conveyor A moves. f

As best illustrated in Fig. 1, the shaft 53 is ydisposed adjacent the sprocket shaft 23 but 4is located in rear of (that is. to the left in Fig. 1) the sprocket shaft. The turret pocket D which is shaped and disposed to receive a container a while it is still in the cage B islbrought adjacent to a cage as the container passes into the turret pocket. Thisv is at the positionmarked Xin Figs.

-i and 4. It is at position X where the container wise direction (Figs. 1 and .4).

v-is lifted from the holding cage and is transferred vto the turret by means of the transfer deviceEr It is then carried by the turret in a counterclock- A stationary cam 58 surrounds the lower' end of the shaft 53 (Figs. 2, 3 and "I) and isjheld against rotation by a boltv 59 which extends from the lower wall of the frame 26 adjacentthe bearing 54 andinto the cam. Just beyond the periphery of the cam 58 a series of sleeve hubs 6I are formed in the turret `C and extend be-- tween the two turret plates 52. Each hub 6I incloses a vertically extending bore 62 .in which a sliding rod 63 is mounted. A block 64 `is fas-I tened to the lower end of the rod and is-f'dispresent l posed at the periphery of the stationary cam 58. This block 64 is adapted to be raised and lowered as the turret rotates at which time the rod 63 is raised and lowered in its bore 62.

'Such movement o f theblock 64 is effected by engagement of a cam roller 65, which is rotatably mounted on a pin 66 carried in theblock 64. Iwith a cam groove 61 formed in the periphery .of the stationary cam 58. As the turret C ro- 61 ofthe' stationary cam 58.

tates each block 64 carried thereby is moved around a circular path of travel during which time its cam roller traverses the cam groove `This cam groove Vis formed to-cause the block 64 to lift when the block passes' adjacent the .can transfer station X.' It is this-lifting movement that effects the lifting of the can from its cage B. A lifting arm 88 extends laterally from each block 64 and as the arm moves up with the block its outer end engages under the`bottom of the container a and lifts it into the position shown at the left in Fig. 2. The can is free of the supporting arms 3| of the cage member when in this raised position.

The shaft 53 above the turret C carries a spider 1| (Figs. l and 2) which is formed with a hub 12 where the spider is carried on the shaftv and with a pair of concentric downwardly extending walls 13 formed adjacent the periphery of the spider. It is thisA spider that carries expanding devices G. An annular ring plate 14 is 'secured to the lower surface of the concentric walls 13 and when the container a is lifted from yits cage B by raising of the arm i8, the upper tinuance of this circular travel of the containers with the turret, the container is held against the plate 14 by the spring held segment track'r 15. A pair of circular guide rails 18 (see also Figs. 2 and 3) carried on bracket 11 mounted on the frame wall 26, maintains the containers in their vturret pockets. The lower guide rail 18 also provides for a pivotal mounting of the segment track as will now be explained. y

The spring track 15 is carried on the inner ends of spaced arms 18, 18 which are located on. two sides of one of the brackets 11.

Arm 18 is longer than the arm 18. Both arms at an equal distance from the circular track carry setscrews 8| which provide for 'a pivotal connection with a lug extension 82 depending from the lower guide rail 18 adjacent the bracket 11. The inner ends of the screws extend into sockets formed in the lug 82 and this allows for slight oscillation of the track 15 relative to the support.

The long arm 18 extends back of and beyond its pivotal mounting as an arm section 85 which is spaced alongside of the bracket 11. This arm section at its outer end is enlarged as at 88 to provide a base for a vertically extending-rod 81 which supports a spring 88. Rod 81 projects through an opening in an auxiliary bracket 89 which is bolted to the bracket 11. Above the bracket the rod carries a locknut 9|.

The pad 86 also threadedly supports a setscrew 92 and provides a stop for holding the track 15 in a definite horizontal position when the i'ull expanding action of the spring 88 is effective. To do this the lower end of the setscrew engages a lug 93 formed in the auxiliary bracket. A locknut 94 threaded on the setscrew holds it in adjusted position so that the pressure of the spring 88 will not lift the spring track beyond a predetermined desired position. By reason -of this spring support, however, the track 15 may be depressed a slight distance should a higher than normal can be in the turret pocket. This construction insures that the can a will be held against the upper ring plate 14 for the expanding operation.

The spring held segment track 15 terminates iust beyond the first bracket 11 and the moving container upon passing from this track engages on a second spring held segment track |0| (Fig. 4) which is identical in construction to the .spring track 15 and its mounting. Accordingly The long arm |08 extends back alongside of the bracket and carries a spring unit mounted on a rod |08 projecting up from the arm and extending through'an auxiliary bracket |01. A setscrew |08 provides for the desired stop element for the track |0"|. Track |0| like the spring track 15 also keepsthe container in its raised position against the ring plate 14. It is while the container is in its raised position that the expanding devices G become effective. These will next be considered.

The different units of the expanding device G are all carried in the spider 1| which by-reason of its close association with the turret may be considered to be broadly a part of the tur- 'ret assembly. For the most part the expanding devices and expanding ngers are conned in the space` between the concentric walls 13. The expanding devices are carried on shafts (Figs. 1 and 5) which extend between the concentric walls. In each expanding 'device unit there are two adjacent shafts for supporting two expanding fingers.

On each shaft4 and in the space between the concentric walls is mounted a split hub |I2 which is adapted to be clamped in fixed position on the shaft by a. locknut H3. Each hub 2 is lformed with a laterally extending arm ||4 theltwo arms of the two adjacent hubs extending outwardly in opposite directions as best shown in Fig. 5.

Each arm ||4 carries a pin ||5 which projects outwardly beyond the outer concentric wall 13 through a clearance opening IIE cut in the wall. A cam roller ||1 is rotatably mounted oneach pin ||5 and such cam roller is thus located out beyond the outer concentric wall.

As the individual containers a advancing in their counterclockwise travel with the turrets pass from the feed station X the two cam rollers ||1 associated with that container move into cam track |2| (Figs. 1, 3 and 8) formed in a channel cam |22. This lchannel cam is circular in plan and is concentric with the turret shaft 53 being located just beyond the outer wall ofthe spider 1|. It is held in a stationaryv ing of the cam on the bracket` |26 is in between.

the two guide track brackets 11 as best shown in Fig. 1.

The cam is formed with adownwardly extending arm |28 which is adapted to be held securely onthe bracket wall |25. Arm |28 is formed with a lvertically disposed bore |29 which is internally threaded to provide for an of the frame 25.

adjusting bolt III. The bolt lll is formed-with parallel collar sections |32 which rotatably engage a block I 23 bolted at I 34 to the lower end vof the bracket extension |25. By turning the adjusting bolt' |3| the cam I 22 may be raised and lowered according to the direction of its rotation.

After the cam has been adjusted to its desired vertical position it is locked in place by a locking bolt |35 which extends through a slot |36 cut in the bracket wall |25, the bolt head resting against a washer when the bolt is screwed tight. V'I'he stem ofthe bolt is threadedly engaged in the cam extension |24. By means of this construction the cam |22 is adjusted to a desired horizontal position in order to provide for the proper operating eect upon the expandin'g device G as it passes along this cam track.

Each l'rub |'I2 (Fig. 5) is extended `downwardly at |4| to provide for support of an expanding finger |42. There is a nger |42' for each of the two hub members ||2 in each individual expanding device G and each finger is held in position by a block .|43 which is bolted against thev finger. the bolt passing through an opening in the block and having threaded connection with the. extension |4|.

b When the transfer device E lifts the container to its raised position against the ring plate 14 it positions the plug section e of the closure element c over the vends of the two adjacent fingers |42. These fingers at such timeare in collapsed position, that is, in a position nearest to each other. When the container reaches its raised position the lower surfaces of the expanding fingers |42`iust clear the top of the `depressed'plug ysection e of the can closure element.

As the container is advanced along its circular path of travel, the cam rollers |I 1 of` the expanding device G pass through-a'raised section of the cam track and this swings each of the arms 4 so that the two fingers |42 are separated or forced 'outwardly into `the position shown in Fig. 5. In moving vinto this posi-'- tion the vertical wall of the depressed plug section e is forced outwardly and the lugs f' are thus formed on opposite sides in the closure element.

As soon as the lugs have thus been formed the expanding unit continuing along the circular path of travel causes the cam rollers ||1 to traverse a lowered section of the cam track and the expanding unit is thus moved back into its in thus free the walls of the closure elements.

After this expanding operation has taken place and as the closed can a continues on in its circular path of travelit reachesthe end of the spring pressed track 0|. Just before `dropping off of this track it passes above circu- Track segment is mounted upon a pair of arms |48 .which extend outwardly from a bracket |41. This .bracket is mounted on a block |48 which is carried on the lower wall The bracket |41 also provides sugpport for the discharge ends of the two guide rails 1B. In dropping to this lower 75 ||l|, the can drops down to the lower level the container is entirely freed from the spider 1| and spider ring plate 14 and from the, expanding units G and in such lowered position continues its travel toward the discharge belt F. The track |45 and also the guide rails 16 extend out into .a straight section 4at the discharge end o f the machine so that as the can bodies approach the discharge belt F they are diverted from their circular path of travel and are removed fromthe turret pockets. This removal of a can from the turret pocket is accomplished by cooperation with a straight inner guide' rail |49 (Fig. l) which is carried in the frame of the machine and which extends parallel to a straight section of the guide rails-16. as well as the guide rails 16 and |48 extend to a position adjacent the discharge belt and the containers are guided onto the discharge belt. The belt removes them from the machine.

The discharge belt F in the present apparatus takes over a carry-off pulley |5| (Figs. l and 2) which is mounted on a horizontal shaft |52 journaled in bearings |53 formed in the frame 26. The shaft |52 may be rotated in any suitable manner to provide for the proper travel '.of the discharge belt so that the containers are removed from thel machine as succeeding containers are discharged from the turret.

It is thought that the invention and many.

of itsjattendant advantages will be understood from the foregoing description, and it will be apparent that various changes may be made in l. In a machine for handling a fiber container having a closure element hingedly mounted on the top Wall thereof and which is in an inserted position in an opening in said wall, the combination of mechanism for advancing a said container along-a predetermined path of travel through the machine, means for supporting said container as it is so advanced, and means operative during the advancement of the container by said advancing 'mechanism for expanding beneath the container top wall a restricted portion of that part of the closure wall which extends into the opening of said container to temporarily retain said closure element in closed position on the container, said container supporting means having a spring pressed mounting to compensate for fiber containers of slightly varying heights and to prevent crushing and damage thereto during the expanding operation.

2. In a machine for handling a fiber coi).-

. tainer having a closure element hingedly mounted on the top wall thereof arid which is in an inserted position in an opening in said wall,'the combination of a rotatable turret for advancing a said container along a predetermined path ofv travel through the machine, means for supporting said container during such advancement, and meansl carried bysaid turret and operative during the advancement of the container by said turret for expanding beneath the container top wall a restricted portion of that part of the Vclosure wall which extends into the opening of said container to temporarily retain said closure element in closed position on the container, saidl container supporting means having a spring The track |45` pressed mounting to compensate for iiber containers of slightly varying heights and to prevent crushing and damage thereto during the expanding operation.

3. In a machine for handling a ber container having a closure element hingedly mounted on the top wall thereof and which is in an inserted position in an opening in said wall, the combination of a rotatable .turret having a peripheral pocket for advancing a said container along va predetermined path of travel through the m`achine, a feed conveyor` for bringing the containers into said turret, transfer means for engaging said container on said feed conveyor and elevat= ing the same therefrom into said turret pocket, and expanding means carried by said turret and operative during the advancement of the `container by said turret for pressing out a part of the closure wall which extends into the opening formed in said container top wall at two opposite points in order to engage the closure element under the container top wall to temporarily retain said closure element in closed position for subsequent operation on the container.

4. In a machine for handling a fiber container having a closure element hingedly mounted on the top wall thereof and which is in an inserted position in an opening in said wall, the combination of a rotatable turret having peripherally disposedv container receiving pockets for holding and for advancing the containers in a circular path of travel, means adjacent said turnt for supporting the containers as the same are advanced, expanding nger units carried by said turret with a said unit disposed above each turret pocket, each of said units being adapted to extend into the said closure element of the container which is being carried within'its corresponding turret pocket, and -means for moving said finger units to expand beneath the container top wall a restricted portion of that part of the closure wall which extends into the opening of said container to temporarily retain said closure element in closed position on the container, said container supporting means having a spring pressed mounting to compensate for fiber containers of 'slightly varying heights and to prevent crushing and damage thereto during the expanding operation.

5. In a machine for handling a fiber container having a closure element hingedly mounted on the top wall thereof and which is in an inserted position in an opening in said wall, the combination of a rotatable turret having container `receiving pockets .for holding and for advancing fingers which are adapted to extend into the saidl closure element of the container which is being ycarried Within its corresponding turret pocket,

and means for separating the two .fingers in each nger unit so as to expand beneath the container. top wall two opposed restricted portions of that part of the closure wall which extends into the opening of said container to tem# porarily retain said closure element in closed position on the container, said container supporting track having a. yieldable spring pressed mounting to compensate for ber containers of slightly varying heights and to prevent crushing and damage thereto while the expanding operation is performed on said closure element.

6. In a machine for handling a fiber container having a closure element hingedly mountedon the top wall thereof and which is in an inserted position in an opening in said wall, the combination of a rotatable turret having container receiving pockets for holding and for advancing the containers in a circular path of travel, a feed conveyor having container holding cage members for bringing a container which has been deposited in a said cage member adjacent to said' turret, transfer devices for lifting a container out of its cage member and for positioning it into'a said turret pocket, a pair of expanding fingers pivotally carried by said turret above each of its pockets which extend into the closure element of its pocketed conl tainer as soon as such container is positioned in the turret pocket by said transfer devices, and cam means for rocking each pair of iingers on said pivotal mounting to expand the said closure element at the two opposite points to engage under the container top Wall to temporarily retain the closure element in closed position.

LLEWELLYN BIGGS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2608918 *Oct 20, 1948Sep 2, 1952Quaker Oats CoApparatus for inserting closures in containers
US4732315 *Mar 10, 1987Mar 22, 1988The Procter & Gamble CompanyDispensing package
US4981256 *Mar 19, 1990Jan 1, 1991Lever Brothers CompanyUltrathin carton closure
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/136, 493/156, 229/125.9, 493/394
International ClassificationB65B7/28
Cooperative ClassificationB65B7/2842
European ClassificationB65B7/28F