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Publication numberUS2282545 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1942
Filing dateDec 5, 1939
Priority dateDec 5, 1939
Publication numberUS 2282545 A, US 2282545A, US-A-2282545, US2282545 A, US2282545A
InventorsRosenstein Nathan M
Original AssigneeMyrtle Knitting Mills Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment pocket and method of making same
US 2282545 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 12, 1942 N. M. RosENsT'ElN 2,282,545

GARMENT POCKET AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed Dec, 5, 1939 Patented May 12, 1942 GARMENT PooKEm AND MErHoDoF MAKING SAME i Nathan M. Rosenstein, West Hartford, Conn., as"

signor to Myrtle Knitting Mills, Incorporated, a corporation of Connecticut Application December '5, 1939, Serial No. 307,57d

12 claims. ,Y `(ci. 2 247) My invention relates to garment pockets and methods of making the same.

It has among its objects to provide an improved pocket structure especially adapted to use on inexpensive garments and, more particularly, such a structure whereby a stronger pocket of better wearing qualities and improved appearance is produced. A further object of my invention is to provide such a construction wherein the quantity of material required in making the pocket is reduced, as well as the time necessary for the operator, and wherein the cost of producing my improved pocket is accordingly substantially reduced, as compared with prior constructions. A

further object of my invention'is to provide an "5 surface 5b of the sewing' or .binding 5 around the outer surface' 8 of the improved method for making such pockets whereby the above advantages are obtained, while eliminating all need for the use of sewed-on braid, or of manual cutting of the latter, orof pulling the pocket through to the other side of the cloth during the process of manufacture, all in such manner as markedly to facilitate the work of the operator and rexpedite and cheapen the process of making the pocket. These and other objects of my improvements will, however, hereinafter more fully appear.

In the accompanying drawing I have shown shown in Figure 1'. Thena strip of pocket form-f' Referring t'o the Iillustrative construction shown in Figures 1 to 5l and more particularly shown in Figures vv3":t`o 5,"it will be noted that I have shown a pocket structurecomprisingco.- operating pocket forming portions l and Zsewed aroundtheir periphery at 3 and leading upward to a pocketvopening or slit 4 which is suitably sewed or bound, asy at 5, `with an enclosed gimp' or cord of usuali character Yand with Aspaced portions 5a disposedonf opposite sides of and around this opening'll;` the pocket forming portions I and'2 being-disposed on the'innerisur-iw face of the garment' material I-r and' connected thereto by the sewingf5, while only the finished opening 4, appears onf-the garment material 1. In a preferred method of making my improved pocket, the fabric IIconstituting the garment is disposed 4with its outer/surface 8 downward, as

ing material, vgenerally indicated at 9 and of-'sufcient size to. form .a 'pocket' therefrom, is" laid over the inside surface Iof material 1, as shown i251 in Figure 1, with its outer surface Il) on top and for purposes of illustration certain embodiments of my improved construction which may be produced while carrying out my improved method.

In the drawing- Figure l is a perspective View of thev inner surfaces of the component pieces of cloth stitched and cut to form the completed pocket opening;

Fig. 2 is a similar'view showing the inner flaps of the pocket forming material disposed in overlying relation ready for sewing together, dotted lines indicating the subsequently cut and sewed edges;

Fig. 3 is a similar view showing these edges when cut and sewed;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Figure 3 but showing the opposite or outer surface of thegarment with the finished pocket therein, the outlineof `the body of the latter being indicated in dotted lines;

Fig. 5 is a sectional View of the completed pocket structure shown in Figure 4;

Fig. 5a is an enlarged detail showing the gimp;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Figure 5 but showing a modied construction including a flap; y

Fig. '7 is a view similar to Figure 6 but showing a modied form of fiap construction, and

Fig. 8 is a detail view similar to Figure 4 but showing a modified form of reinforced pocket structure.

its .inner surface vI I restingupon the inner'sur' face 6 of the garment/material '|.l With the ,por"

tion 'l of the-garment' and Hstrip S in this relation,

these two pieces are then connected, preferably midway between the ends yofstrip by thefstitching 5 so that "twop'ortions .I' and 2.'..of equal-.size are thus provided on'oppositelsidesof the stitching 5. This stitching 5 is also preferably` button-y hole stitching and the spaced stitch sections A5u thereof are connected together' at their ends ina manner usual in formingbuttonholes. Further, the materialofthe two portions 9 `and lis suitably slit or cut between Ithe two portions 15a', as indicated at 4, inza manner usual in lforming buttonholes; this cutting operationin this embodiment of my improved method being ,'per.- formed immediatelyfollowing thecompletion of the buttonhole stitching. Here it will also be understood that'ithe latter stitching is applied in such manner that the outer or iinished stitching, as shown at 5b,'is onthe outer' surface 8 of the garment portion T. -With the pocket forming strip 9 thus sewed tothe garment portion'l'and the material of bothrstrips' slit-as shown at 4, one endvportion l yof the strip '9' is next folded over the other end portion'Z thereof, as lshown v in Figure 2.` Thereup'omthe two 'portions'l and 2 are cut tothe 'desired pocket shape, as, for example, indicated -in ldotted lines at I3 in Figure-Zgi l and the two edgesfl3 are sewed together, prefer-` ably vvith an overedging stitch, as indicated at I4 in Figure 3, these sewing and cutting operasame, it will be observed that it is made possible'i f to utilize only tWo pieces of cloth, namely, thev j garment material 'I and the strip 9 of pocket material. Further, it will be noted that the ,conllstruction is such that these two strips maybe seWed together While forming the buttonhole stitching portions 5a and 5b of the sewed .por-

tion 5 in a buttonhole making machine, smaller pockets, such, for example, as handkerchief pockets,.being seWed and cut in a standard machine, While larger pockets are formed on machines diifering from standard machines only in being adapted to produce a longer buttonhole. vIt will also be observed that as a result of my improvements it is made possible to perform both, the cutting of the portions I3 and the sewing thereof in a' -single operation, as, for example, in a standard overedging and cutting machine which isV adapted .to overedge, or bind, the cut edges I3 Whilesevving the latter as indicated at I4. 'I'he pocket structure is also such .that the pocket is very'strong and long wearing, due not only to the'b'uttonhole stitching along the opening therein', but'also to the overedging` I4 uniting the cut edges of the pocket forming pieces I Vand 2.-

These results are also obtainable while materiallyv reducing the operators time heretofore required in making the pocket and materially facilitating the process of making the same, it being wholly unnecessary to seW on any additional transverse strips of tape or the like and subsequently manually'` to cut or slit these strips as heretofore necessary. Moreover, it will be observed that all ofthe work is done on the Wrong sideof the garmentwithout requiring any operation involving so-called pulling through of the pocket.' Attention is 'also directed to the attractive appearance of the finished pocket, illustrated in Figure 4,1 only the attractively finished buttonhole stitched portions 5b being visible. Further, there areino other sewed portions inside'and adjacent the 'mouth of the pocket andalso .visible when the' pocket is open as is the case in prior constructions and which also act to produce a bulky pocket andan unattractive cheap appearance. As a result of my improvements, and'while obtaining these advantages, it isalso madepossible very materially to reduce theacost of manufacture, the' same being only a small fraction of that heretofore required. l i

' While I have described my improved method as being carried out with the material 'I face do'vvnon the bottom and the finished surface 5b ofthe stitching 5 formed on the outer surface of the garment portion 1, and the slit 4 inserted after completion of thisstitching, it will be understood that, if desired,`thisv method maybe varied. For example, the finished surface 5b may be formed when the outer surface of garf ment portion 'I is on top, and the slit 4, if desired, may be inserted before applying the stitching 5; the strip 9 then, of course, being disposed under the garment portion I. Preferably in the use'of my improvements,v the slit 4 kis formed after the buttonhole stitching 5 is applied when the material of the garment portion 'I is knit material, and inserted before the material is seWed, as at 5, when the garment material is Woven material. In either case, it will be understood that standard types of buttonhole making machine, now available on the market, may be utilized to perform this sewing and cutting or slitting operation, different machines of the socalled cut before and cut after types being available. Further, it Will be evident that,` ins stead of having the inner surface II of the pockreversed, if desired, and that the small strip 9 j of pocket material may be formed of the same material as the portion 1, or of a different material if desired. Obviously, also the gimp 5' may be omitted in certain ca ses as, for example, in vvomensgarments of silk or the like.

In Figures 6 and '7, I have illustrated modied constructions utilizing different forms of flaps overlying the opening or slit. Referring rstfto the construction shown in Figure 6, it Will be noted that this structure is the same as shown in Figure 5, save that a facing flap I6 overlies the slit 4 in the finished pocket. In forming this construction,-the iiap I6 has one edge Ia laid in such position that it extends along what will be the upper edge of the opening 4, i. e., so that one of the cross portions 5a of the stitching 5 iii f mouth, as shown in Figure 6.

will also sevv this edge ISa' of this flap to the outer surface of the garment portion 1; this flap I6 being thereafter folded down over the pocket In Figure 7, a like construction is illustrated but having aiiap I'I and having the opposite edge I'Ia of this flap sevved by the stitching 5 to the opposite or lower edge of the slit I2, this ap being folded upward to produce a mouth portion overlying and leading down into the mouth 4 of the pocket while having its ends transversely sewed to the garment portion 'I as shown at I'Ib. Attention is further directed to the fact that my improved construction makes it readily possible, When desired, to embody decorative'features, as, for example, through utilizing decorative stitching 5b or I5 or decorative flaps of different colors or having decorative designs thereon, this being of importance when the pockets are made in Womens coats orsweaters. On the other hand, the construction is also adap-ted for use on garments of plain serviceable character as, for example, mens or boys pants or on work clothing, the buttonhole stitching and overedging producing an exceedingly strong long Wearing pocket.`

' While I have herein specifically described certain forms of my improved structure and method, it Will be understood that the same `have been described for purposes of illustration and that my invention is not limited thereto and may be embodied in other forms Without departing from its spirit or the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a garment having a pocket slit, pocket forming means inside said garment having a slit therein and the edges of the latter surrounding said pocket slit, and buttonhole stitching around the edges of said slits forming an exposed stitched margin of thevpocket aperture on the outside of the garment and also connecting the margin of said slit in said pocket forming means to the margin of said Docket slit. Y l

forming means inside said garment having a slit therein and the edges of the latter surrounding said pocket slit, and buttonhole stitching on the inside and outside faces of said garment and around the margins of said slits including a reenforcing gimp on the outside face of the garment also extending around said slits and bound by said buttonhole stitching on said outside face, and also having said buttonhole stitching connecting the margin of the slit in said pocket forming means to the margin of said pocket slit.

4. In a garment having a pocket slit, pocket forming means inside said garment having a slit therein and the edges of the latter surrounding said pocket slit, buttonhole stitching around the edges of said slits connecting the edges of said pocket slit to said edges of the slit in said pocket forming means, and a ap disposed on the outer surface of said garment and overlying said slits and having an edge extending along one edge of said slits on the outer face of said garment and sewed thereto.

5. In a garment having a pocket slit, pocket forming means inside said garment having a slit therein and the edges of the latter surrounding said pocket slit, buttonhole stitching around 2v.

the edges of said slits and connecting the edges of said pocket slit to said edges of the slit in said pocket forming means, and a iap disposed on the outer surface of said garment and having an edge extending along one edge of said slits on the outer face of said garment and sewed thereto by said buttonhole stitching and the remainder of said flap overlying said slits and depending from the sewed edge of said ilap.

6. In a garment having a pocket slit, pocket forming means inside said garment having a slit therein and the edges of the latter surrounding said pocket slit, buttonhole stitching around the edges of said slits and connecting the edges of said pocket slit to said edges of the slit in said pocket forming means, and a flap disposed on the outer surface of said garment and having an edge extending along one edge of said slit on the outer face of said garment and sewed thereto by said buttonhole stitching and having the res mainder of said flap extending upward from the sewed edge thereof and having its opposite ends transversely sewed to said garment to form a mouth for said slit.

7. The steps in making garment pockets which consist in, superimposing an unslit garment part and an unslit pocket part, and forming in the same machine a stitched aperture of pocket size in the garment part and in the pocket part while the same are held superimposed and while connecting the parts together by the stitching around the margin of said aperture.

8. The method of making pockets which consists in, placing an unslit garment and an unslit pocket strip in superimposed relation with said pocket strip along the inside face of said garment, and while said garment and strip are so disposed, forming in successive operations, each simultaneously performed on said garment and strip, a transversely extending finished pocket opening having stitching connecting said garment and strip together around said opening and located at a point intermediate the ends of said strip, and sewing together the edges of said ends of the pocket strip to complete the pocket while said strip is on the same face of the garment.

9. The method of making pockets which consists in, placing an unslit garment and an unslit pocket strip in superimposed relation with said pocket strip along the inside face of said garment, and while said garment and strip are so `disposed, forming in successive buttonhole forming operations, each simultaneously performed onv said garment and strip, a transversely extending finished buttonhole of suitable size to form the pocket opening having stitching connecting said garment and strip together around said opening and located at a point intermediate the ends of said strip, and sewing together the edges of said ends of the pocket strip to complete the pocket while said strip is on the same face of the garment.

10. The method of making pockets which consists in, disposing an unslit pocket forming strip and an unslit garment in superimposed relation, with said strip along the inside surface of the garment, laying a flap on the outside surface of the garment with one edge extending transversely of said strip intermediate its ends, buttonhole stitching and slitting through both the garment and strip adjacent said edge of said flap to form a nished pocket opening while sewing said edge of the lap to the garment, and folding and sewing the ends of the strip to form a pocket.

11. The method of making pockets which consists in, disposing an unslit pocket forming strip and an unslit garment in superimposed relation, with said strip along the inside surface of the garment, laying a ap on the outside surface of the garment with its lower edge extending transversely of said strip intermediate its ends, buttonhole stitching and slitting through both the garment and strip adjacent said edge of said flap to form a finished pocket opening while sewing said edge of the flap to the garment, folding and sewing the ends of said strip to form a pocket, and folding said flap downward around its,` lower edge to cover the buttonhole.

12. The method of making pockets which consists in, disposing an unslit pocket forming strip and an unslit garment in superimposed relation, with said strip along the inside surface of the garment, laying a flap on the outside surface of the garment with its upper edge extending transversely of said strip intermediate its ends, buttonhole stitching and slitting through both the garment and strip adjacent said edge of said iiap to form a finished pocket opening While sewing said edge of the flap to the garment, folding and sewing the ends of said strip to form a pocket, and stitching the opposite ends of said flap to the garment while said ap is folded upward to overlie the mouth of the pocket.

NATHAN M. ROSENSTEIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2763011 *Jan 13, 1955Sep 18, 1956Gross Nedward NReversible blouse
US2826158 *Dec 30, 1953Mar 11, 1958Reece CorpAttachment for sewing pockets
US2977602 *Jun 12, 1958Apr 4, 1961Cooper Stewart AConcealed pocket for football players' pants
US4263678 *Oct 2, 1978Apr 28, 1981Haggar CompanyPocket construction
US4321710 *Apr 7, 1980Mar 30, 1982Haggar CompanyPocket construction
US4349920 *Jul 14, 1980Sep 21, 1982Haggar CompanyPocket construction
US4961235 *Apr 27, 1989Oct 9, 1990Williger Karen SSock with pocket and related method
US5027729 *Oct 7, 1988Jul 2, 1991Cimcorp OyMethod of manufacturing a pocket construction provided with a welt
WO1989003184A1 *Oct 7, 1988Apr 20, 1989Cimcorp OyMethod of manufacturing a pocket construction provided with a welt
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/247
International ClassificationA41D27/20
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/20
European ClassificationA41D27/20