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Publication numberUS2283308 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1942
Filing dateMar 25, 1940
Priority dateMar 25, 1940
Publication numberUS 2283308 A, US 2283308A, US-A-2283308, US2283308 A, US2283308A
InventorsJames Bean
Original AssigneeJames Bean
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shipping apparatus
US 2283308 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 19, 1942: J. BEAN SHIPPING APPARATUS 38heets-Sheet 1 Filed March 25, 1940 INVENTOR.

BMF Rwy I ATTORNEYS.

May 19, 1942.

J, BEAN SHIPPING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-"Sheet 2 Filed March 25, 1940 guxxxxxx l IN V EN TOR.

. A TTORNEYS.

May 19, 1942.

J. BEAN 2,283,308

SHIPPING APPARATUS Filed March 25, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR.

54 F 1 15 ATTORNEYS.

Patented May 19, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENTVAOAFFICE SHIPPING APPARATUS James Bean, Alhambra, Calif.

Application March 25, 1940, Serial No. 325,727

4 Claims.

The present invention relates to apparatus for packing or stowing objects of irregular shape in containers for shipment. The embodiment of the invention herein described and illustrated is designed particularly for packing certain parts of automobiles in box cars for railway shipment, although it may also be used without essential change for the packing of other objects of generally similar shape in other shipping vehicles or containers.

The principal objects of the invention are to provide means for stowing the greatest possible number of objects in a given space; to hold each object securely and rigidly in order to prevent shifting and damage during transportation; to provide apparatus which can be quickly and easily installed in a car during the loading of the articles to be shipped; and to provide apparatus which can be adapted to the stowing and holding of articles of different sizes. Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description of a preferred embodiment thereof, which should be read with the understanding that changes within the limits of the claims hereto appended may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the various parts, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

In the automobile industry, it is customary to ship, large numbers of parts or assemblies of parts from the factory to assembly plants. One

item which is handled in this manner is the steering gear assembly consisting of a, housing containing the worm gear and a comparatively long shaft extending from said housing and rigidly connected with the worm therein. The housing has a boss extending from one side through which projects a short shaft at right angles to the long shaft previously mentioned. Because of the length ofthe long shaft and the necessity for preserving accurate'alignment of the various parts these steering gear assemblies are awkward and difiicult to ship successfully. It is for this purpose that the apparatus herein described has been designed.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a horizontal section of a portion of a freight car with the improved stowing apparatus therein.

Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal section of the same taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Figs. 3 and 4 are vertical transverse sections taken on the lines 33 and 4-4 of Fig. 2 respectively.

Figs. 5 and 6 are respectively a broken plan and a broken elevation of one of the supporting bars on an enlarged scale.

Fig. '7 is a section of the same bar taken on the line 7-1 of Fig. 5.

Figs. 8 and 9 are respectively a broken plan and a broken elevation of one of the shaft supporting bars.

Figs. 10, 11 and 12 are sections of the same on the respective lines l0-l0, ll-ll, and |2l2, of Fig. 9.

Figs. 13 and 14 are respectively a broken plan and a broken elevation of one of the uppermost gear case clamping bars.

Fig. 15 is a section of the same on the line l5l5 of Fig. 14. v

The steering gear assemblies which are to be stowed and shipped are shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, as comprising a body portion or housing I 6 and a long portion in the form of a shaft l1 extending therefrom. The housing I6 has a boss l8 projecting from one side, through which extends a short shaft [9 at right angles to the long shaft H. The side walls and floor of the car are shown at 20 and 2| respectively, and to said side walls are secured vertical strips 22 and 22' in which are holes 23 and 23' arranged in pairs, as shown in Fig. 2.

gear case 7 The steering gear assemblies are stowed in in Figs. 1 and 2.

for support. The bars 24 which extend across between the outer strips 22 are adapted to support the gear housings l6, and the bars 25 which extend across between the middle strips 22' are adapted to support the long shafts l1.

Each bar 24, as shown in Figs. 1 to 7, comprises a wooden member 26 of approximately square section reinforced by a steel angle member 21 on its bottom and one side. At one end of the bar the right hand end in Figs. 5 and 6, a U-shaped member 28 is secured, preferably by welding, to the bottom of the angle member 2! in such a position that it provides two spaced pins 28' extending beyond the end of the bar and spaced apart horizontally, the proper distance to enter the holes 23 in one of the side wall strips 22. At the other end of the bar are a pair of spaced movable pins 29' formed preferably by a U-shaped member 29 whose midportion is rotatably held in a strap 30 secured to the bottom of the angle member 21. It will be seen that the bar 24 can be mounted between any two opposite pairs of holes 23 by first inserting the fixed pins 28 in the holes at one side while the bar is in a slightly inclined position, and then inserting the movable pins 29 in the holes at the opposite side and at the same time lowering that end of the bar upon said movable pins. The bar then becomes a weight supporting member extending across the car.

A plate 3| approximately twice the width of the bar 24 is secured to the top thereof by bolts 32. The plate 3| extends for slightly less than the full length of the bar as shown in Figs. 1, and 6. The portion of said plate which extends laterally over the side of the bar forms an upper flange which is bent downwardly at a slight angle, as shown in Fig. '7, and is provided with spaced holes 33, Fig. 5, forming sockets of proper diameter to receive the bosses 18 which project from the lower sides of the gear housingslB. Vertical transverse brackets 34 extend downwardly from the overhanging flange portion of the plate 3! and are preferably welded tosaid plate and to the anglemember 21 along their junctions therewith as indicated at 35 in Fig. 7. r

A horizontal plate 36 is secured by bolts 31 to the brackets 34, and is aligned with the bottom of the bar 24, to form a lower flange spaced from the upper flange.

The shaft supporting bars 25, as illustrated particularly in Figs. 8 to 12 preferably comprise upper and lower wooden member 38 and 39, the lower member 39 being reinforced by a fiat steel strip 40, to which are secured a pair of fixed pins 4| at one end, and movable pins 42 at the other end, similar to the pins 29 and 3B of the bars 24. The two wooden members 38 and 39 are removably held together by suitable clamping means, preferably comprising pairs of steel strips 43 secured by bolts 44 to the lower member 39 near the ends of the bar, the upper member 38 being removably secured between said steel strips 43 by pins 45. The members 38 and 39 have matching semicylindrical sockets 46 adapted to. receive and clamp the long shafts I! of the steering gears as illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 4, alternate sockets being inclined oppositely.

The use of the apparatus above described will be clearly understood from consideration of Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4. Considering only one tier of loading, two ofthe bars 24 are placed imposition with their pins 29 and engaging the lowermost holes 23 of the strips 22, and one of the bars 25 is engaged with the holes 23' of the strips 22' between the two bars 24, the upper member 38 of the bar 25 having been removed. A row of steering gear assemblies are then placed on the bars 24 each with its boss 18 extending through one of the holes 34 in said bars, and the long shafts l1 resting in the sockets 46 of the bar 25. Another pair of bars 24 are then positioned above the steering gear housings which are supported by the lower pair of bars 24. The vertical spacing of the holes 23 is such that the bottom flanges of the upper bars 24 are close to or rest lightly upon the tops of the gear housings which are supported by the lower pair of bars 24, thereby retaining said housings in position. The upper wooden member 38 of the bar 25 is then placed in position, thereby clamping the long sion flange 5| reinforced by braces 52.

shafts I! in the sockets 46. A second bar 25 is positioned above the first bar 25 and the next row or layer of gear assemblies is placed in position. This process is repeated until the tier is complete. The uppermost row or layer of gear assemblies can be held in position by bars 24 if desired, although it is preferable, in order to save space and weight, to use special bars 41 at the top of the tier. I

This bar 41, illustrated particularly in Figs. 13, 14 and 15, comprises an angle member 48 to the ends of which are secured fixed pins 49 and movable pins 50, and which has a lateral flat exten- Inasmuch as this special bar 41 has no gear housings to be supported by it, it has no holes, and is designed to resist upward rather than downward thrust. The movable pins 50 are, therefore, locked to the bar after the latter has been positioned by means of a clamp 53 and a pin 54, thereby locking the entire tier of gear housings solidly in position.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for stowing irregular objects in containers, said objects having relatively long portions projecting from one side. and relatively short portions projecting from another side at approximately right angles to the long portions, comprising a plurality of removable weight supporting bars extending horizontally across the container, said bar s being arranged in two horizontally spaced tiers, each bar having an. upper surface provided with a plurality of sockets formed to receive the short. projecting portions of the objects, said objects resting. upon said upper surfaces of the bars of each tier with their long projecting portions directed toward the bars of the other tier, each bar having a lower surface and being so spaced above the next lower bar of the tier that said lower surface is close to the upper surface of the objects supported by said next lower bar whereby the short projecting portions of said objects are held in said sockets, a third tier of removable bars extending across the container between the two first mentioned tiers of bars, the bars of the third tier being positioned to support the long projecting portions of the objects, supporting members within the container at the ends of said tiers of bars, and separable cooperating connecting means on said supporting members and on said bars. A

2. Apparatus for stowing irregular objects in containers, said objects having relatively long portions projecting from one side and relatively short portions projecting from another side at approximately right angles to the long portions, comprising a plurality of removable weight supporting bars extending horizontally across the container, said bars being arranged in two horizontally spaced tiers, each bar having an upper surface provided with a plurality of sockets formed to receive the short projecting portions of the objects, said objects resting upon said surfaces of the bars of each tier with their long'projecting portions directed toward the bars 'of the other tier, each bar having a lower surface and being so spaced above the next lower bar of the tier that said lower surface is close to the upper surface of the objects supported by said lower bar whereby the short projecting portions of said objects are-held in said sockets, a third tier of removable bars extending across the container between the two first mentioned tiers of bars, each bar of the third tier having a lower member and an upper member, the long projecting 'pormeans on said supporting members and on saidbars.

3. Apparatus for stowing irregular objects in containers, said objects having relatively lon portions projecting from one side and relatively short portions projecting from another side at.

approximately right angles to the long portions, comprising a plurality of removable weight supporting bars extending horizontally across the container, said bars being arranged in two horizontally spaced tiers, each bar having an upper surface provided with a plurality of sockets formed to receive the short projecting portions of the objects, said objects resting upon said upper surfaces of the bars of each tier with their long projecting portions directed toward the bars of the other tier, each bar having a lower surface and being so spaced above the next lower bar of the tier that said lower surface is close to the upper surface of the objects supported'by said next lower bar whereby the short projecting portions of said objects are held in said sockets, a third tier of removable bars extending across the container between the two first mentioned tiers of bars, the bars of the third tier having a plurality of sockets positioned to receive and support the long projecting portions of thevobjects, vertical supporting members fixed to the side walls of the container, and cooperating connecting means'on said vertical members and on the ends of the bars for removably supporting said bars.

4. Apparatus for stowing irregular objects in containers, each of said objects having a body portion and a long portion extending therefrom, comprising a plurality of horizontal bars extending across the container, said bars being arranged in a vertical tier with a row of said body portions between each two bars, said body portions resting on said bars and their long'portions being mutually parallel and directed awa from said tier, a second tier of horizontal bars extending across the container remote from the first mentioned tier of bars, said long portions being engaged andsupported by the second tier of bars, and members at the sides of the container engaging the ends of the bars of both said tiers.

JAMES BEAN

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2449491 *Oct 1, 1947Sep 14, 1948Pennsylvania Railroad CoMeans to prevent shifting of lading in freight carriers
US2873695 *Jan 24, 1956Feb 17, 1959Evans Prod CoFreight loading apparatus
US4310090 *Sep 2, 1980Jan 12, 1982Mackarvich Charles JNestable tie down anchor and package thereof
US8177461Apr 9, 2010May 15, 2012Gunderson LlcTransport and storage of wheelsets
Classifications
U.S. Classification410/33, 206/488
International ClassificationB61D45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61D45/006
European ClassificationB61D45/00C