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Publication numberUS2284443 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1942
Filing dateJul 15, 1940
Priority dateJul 15, 1940
Publication numberUS 2284443 A, US 2284443A, US-A-2284443, US2284443 A, US2284443A
InventorsParadise Raymond P
Original AssigneeParadise Raymond P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Blanket spray nozzle
US 2284443 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 26,' 1942. R. PQ PARADISE 2,284,443

- BLANKET SPRAY NGZZLE Filed July 15, 1940 Patented May 26, 1942 UNITED rSTATES PATENT OFFICE BLANKET SPRAY NOZZLE Raymond P. Paradise, Indianapolis, Ind.

Application July 15, 1940, Serial No. 345,461

` 5 Claims.

This invention relates to nozzles for projecting a liquid in a nely divided or atomized stateA inthe form of` a fan with a uniform state of dispersion across the projected spray and with a considerable depth.

The invention primarily consists of providing a slot-like 'orifice through a spherical cap wherein the sides of the slot each slope toward the axis of the iiuid ow, being further apart between their central parts than at the ends, and

having lands between the terminal ends of the slot sides, these lands having faces perpendicular to the ow axis. The width of the spray and its diffusion may be controlled for any given uid supply pressure by varying the width and length of the slot and by varying the angle of widespread mass of the extinguishing fiuid across the zone of the fire, the uid being in a sufficiently nely dividedstate as will permit the heat of the. fireto quickly vaporize the fluid from the under side of the spray.

Generally ,the sprays heretofore provided have been conical in nature-either hollow or solidand this has meant that the spray would either have to be directed into the re in order to secure a sufficient width of spray, or if directed above the re there would be a rounded under side which would permit the name to travel upwardly therearound without any smotheringor fblanketing off action. A flat form of spray is most effective, but attempts heretofore to obtain it have not been successful in providing a spray having a uniform density across its width. The general diiculty has been that such a spray would give a heavy outer edge boundary with practically nothing in the center such as was visualized in the old type gas jets 'providing fishtail flame. With such a type spray, there would not be sufficient density through the central portions to hold down the re and prevent it from breaking through the spray.

My invention overcomes these diculties by use of an extremely simple form of orifice, the

invention being illustrated in one particular form Fig. 2, a transverse section through the nozzle on the line 2-2 in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3, a section on line 3-3 in Fig. 2; Fig. 4, a section on the line 4-#4 in Fig. 2; Fig. 5, a central section of the orifice plate showing a modified form of orifice end land; and Figp, a central section of the orifice plate showing a further modified form of orifice end land.

throughout the.V several views in the drawing.

The essential feature of the invention is embodied in the orifice plate I0 which comprises a discA of metal having a convex spherical surface presented toward the on-corning fluid. This plate I0 is ,provided with a central orice I I,the

form of which will be hereinafter described; The Plate I0'is provided with an annular flange I2 to engage over the end of the nozzle pipe I3 inside face is made to'be slightly greaterthan the internal diameter of the pipe I3 so that when the plate IIJ is initially positioned overthe end of the pipe I3, the fia'nge I2 does not Seaton the end of the pipe, but instead the inside corner of the p-ipe will strike the curved part of the plate. Then as the nut I 4 is drawn up tightly on the pipe I3, the plateV I0 will be carried inwardly to eventually seat theflange I2 on the pipe end so as to force the curved portion of the platewithin the pipe opening. This'providesja very effective seal. The'difference in diameters between the junction line above described and the pipe diameter is a matter of from five to ten thousandths of an inch depending, of course, upon the pipe diameter.

The plate I0 has an appreciable thickness, as

the drawing indicates, and the orifice. II` is formed in any suitable manner such, for example, as by'use of a milling cutter operated diametrically across the convex side of the plate. There are three essential features involved in this orifice I I. First the orifice is of a slit type wider through its central portions than at its ends and the opposite sides of the slit are sloped at a suitable angle exceeding forty-five degrees, a sixty degree angle being preferable. Then the ends of the orifice do not terminate in lines but have land portions I6 and I'I respectively, having Like characters of reference indicate like parts.

"Sideofthesprayw faces lpositionedat rightangles to*` the flow axis ofthe nozzle. These ,-landsor end zones are es-7 sentialin order to provide a uniform distribution of fthe iluid throughout` the transverse width lof,- the fluid after it leaves the orifice. The sloped I sides-of the orifice and the' tapered nature'there- Y of provide the atomization ofthe iiuid. The'.r-

radius of curvatureof: theplate I will vary in accordance \-vv`ith'the pressure Vof vthe iiuid in the nozzle ll-the,greaterthepressure the less degree^of curvature employed. 'Il'he width of thek oriiice` I l between the sloped sides maybe varied li inxaccordance withfthe'vvolume of spray desired.

f ,The thickness of mtal forming the `plate I0 is made to be sulcientas will cause a directing-am` tionzofthe iluid vasit passes'through the oriflce positeedge. l

. The general operation of the nozzleis repre?y dicated as leaving the'oricezin adiverging manner with a uniformV distribution of;l the atomized particlesof'thetluid. Looking at the spray from the side; .asin'dicatedinFim 4, the spray has an' be imposed by the following claims. .I claim:

1. In a nozzle for a blanlrety spray, an orice plateV having, a spherically curved` surface conappreciable thicknessuw'hich increases with the distance 'from the lorice; 0f 1 course, the under settleinthe nature of.` a l'og.` i 1 As shawn'cin Fiss. 3 and 4,'the1nd'sllandji-r areftlatsuriaces in a :common plane perpendicu- .lar`-` to thel central axis throughthe plate l0.

ill` tend'todrop downwardly underi the iniluence-ofgravity as the tinyldrops vvexly presentedtoward the flow of 'iluid through the 'nzzl'ejand having aslot throughthe plate centrally" positioned 'thereacrossfsaid` slot being.;

wider through itsY central portionthan at its ends, said Vends terminating in areasrnormal the axisof said ilo'w,fsaid areasspacing apart the,

, slides'of said slot.

`2."In a-nozzle for` a kblanket spray, an ,oriflce' plate-having a spherically curved surface, 4coni vexly presented ltowardgthexilow ofe'uidthrough i -theinozzle'and having a Vslot through'thelplate centrallypositioned thereacross,"s'aid slot beingl Wider through its central. portionl than att. its` vendsgsaii"ends terminatingixi 'areasnormal 'toly the vaxis of said-dow', said areasfspacing`-`apart `the sides of said slot, and saidslot s idesbeig of sulcient thickness and'angularityl asto direct iiowof saidjtluidangularlyfrom said nozzle flow,

one sidetoward theother vio'r atomization'of the This formY of land -isV simple to c form V and is'very effective. In Fig. 5 is shown amodied land Il in `V that While4 all elements in, its facey are -per` 3. An o riiice plate for a'nozzlehavingl afpor-V tion convexly'eurved forpresentation t'owardon-K---I coming `fluid and a central slot cut throughthe'A plate from the convex side to have vthaltfshape and form asfivouldl be. cut by moving 'diametri- 1 cally and transverselyacross the `plate al'rotary` milling, cutter'with ya cylindrical cutting-periphf-r pendicular tothe directionfofthe plate axis, its faceds curved/betweentheendsdofthey side edges; Voixtheorice II. l In Flg;6 the land I Qis rnodie. tledfto;have,a Y-shape, butth'e facesfthereof stillV remain, perpendiculary rtzofthe direction of the l nis norbenotedjuiet th slot n "is swipedqu n, present'major side wallstwhose faces decreasein angle with the flow4 axisfrom center to,ends'iof the 5101;.v Thewidthsfbf the lands I6 and |1 are Y varied in accordance `with fthe operating kpresi-ff` sure anddesired width of stream, while bothfthe .i Y lands IL S'Iand Ilandtheangleof the `sidewalls of` the orifice are variedn accordance with the amount of `fluiddischarge required.` reason 'of the (variation in any. one 'nozzle o f fthe slope of the sidewalls from thecenter totheyends thereof, vthe nozzlewill.. Aoperate at any pressure `with uniform distributi'onfof atomization @across the; entire width of .thesprayjwithout Yeither a' "splitting or fnshtailaeeecu or with a neavyienr tral converging owywith' lighter'iboundary `flow,

as Yhas'. been `the dilculty in sprays from other shapesof orifices heretofore employed.

While! have hereintsh'ownand-describedmy eraledge bevelledequally on each side-therefrom fw cui an mended angle orsi ieast ouegrees.'A c 4; An orifice plate forA a 'nozzle havinga por-f` i tionconvexlycurved for l'aresentatiox'i#towa'rdzori#Y coming uidand *af centralslot cut through thei l jplate fromthe convexy side'to havethat shape" and form .as would bereut by a. rotary mnungf v.cutter bevelled'equallyfon each side tofcut an? f included angle'of atleast 60 degrees, andmoved;

diametricallyjand transversely across the plate.` l f 5. In a nozzle, a'substaritially rigid orificeplate having a spherically curvedfc'entral portion con?" 'vexly presented inwardly of the'nozzle,fai'1 out l turned angeabout the` plate, said nozzlehaving f a *plate receiving, mouth into'- which the curved portion of the plate is inserted, the idia'meterfof' `thejunction line between-saidange' and saidcurved portion 4of "the plate` slightly"exceeding that of saidmouth, a iiangeabutting face aroundsaid mouth, Vand meansic'arried by the nozzle `to "drawsaid p late'flange against said facetaforce' said plate curved portion into said mouth Vto` `'effect'a fluid seal between the periphery off said oqmouth `and' said Aplate curved portion. Y' nA'gMoNDr; PARADISE. 11

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2515865 *May 24, 1946Jul 18, 1950Fisher George ARoad marking apparatus
US2563152 *Apr 18, 1947Aug 7, 1951Brandt Henry ESprayer nozzle
US2641509 *Apr 27, 1948Jun 9, 1953Clyde E YostSpray nozzle
US2701412 *Jun 14, 1952Feb 8, 1955Spraying Systems CoMethod of making spray nozzle orifice with plural tapered ends
US3137446 *Jul 9, 1962Jun 16, 1964Onoda Cement Co LtdMultiple nozzle apparatus
US4346848 *Oct 29, 1980Aug 31, 1982Malcolm William RNozzle with orifice plate insert
US4905911 *Feb 7, 1989Mar 6, 1990Shimon Kabushiki KaishaFan-spray nozzle
US5622489 *Apr 13, 1995Apr 22, 1997Monro; Richard J.Fuel atomizer and apparatus and method for reducing NOx
US8037677Feb 5, 2010Oct 18, 2011Lightsail Energy, Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8061132Aug 25, 2010Nov 22, 2011Lightsail Energy, Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8065874Aug 25, 2010Nov 29, 2011Lightsale Energy, Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8087241Aug 25, 2010Jan 3, 2012Lightsail Energy, Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8146354Jan 28, 2010Apr 3, 2012Lightsail Energy, Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8191360Aug 25, 2011Jun 5, 2012Lightsail Energy, Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
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US8196395Jun 25, 2010Jun 12, 2012Lightsail Energy, Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8201402Aug 25, 2010Jun 19, 2012Lightsail Energy, Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8215105Aug 25, 2010Jul 10, 2012Lightsail Energy Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8240142Aug 2, 2011Aug 14, 2012Lightsail Energy Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8247915Mar 24, 2010Aug 21, 2012Lightsail Energy, Inc.Energy storage system utilizing compressed gas
US8353156Oct 28, 2011Jan 15, 2013Lightsail Energy Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US8436489Jan 20, 2011May 7, 2013Lightsail Energy, Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
US20040239045 *Jul 7, 2004Dec 2, 2004Albrecht David E.Flange plates for fluid port interfaces
WO2011008500A2Jun 28, 2010Jan 20, 2011Lightsail Energy Inc.Compressed air energy storage system utilizing two-phase flow to facilitate heat exchange
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/596, 239/597, 451/102
International ClassificationB05B1/04, B05B1/02
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/042
European ClassificationB05B1/04D