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Publication numberUS2284830 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1942
Filing dateMar 26, 1940
Priority dateMar 26, 1940
Publication numberUS 2284830 A, US 2284830A, US-A-2284830, US2284830 A, US2284830A
InventorsLyness Horatio S
Original AssigneeUnited Shoe Machinery Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe and shoe bottom parts
US 2284830 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2, 174,942.y l H. s. LYNE'ss SHOE AND SHOE BOTTOM PARTS Filed March 26, 1940 Wwf/V70@ Ma y Patented June 2, 1942 SHOE AND `SHOE BOTTOM PARTS Horatio S. Lyness,'Lynn, Mass., assignor to United Shoe `Machinery Corporation, Borough of Flemington, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Y Application March 26, 1940,V Serial No. 326,035

13 Claims.`

This invention relates to'improvements in shoes and to `improvements in insole unitsand shank pieces forfshoes. y

It is a well-known practice to reinforce the heel and shank portion of an insole by means of a heel and shankpiece of fabricated sheet material such as berboard which is coextensive with that portion of the insole and is secured to the lower side thereof by means of an adhesive such'as rubber cement Such reinforcement of the insole, however, isusually insufcient to provide the requisite stiffness and strength in the shank portion of the shoe bottom and means such as a conventional shank stiffener of metal or wood'is commonly used porated.

4As herein illustrated these objects have been accomplished, in accordance with one aspect of my invention, by providing a plurality of perforations in a shank reinforcing piece and securing the shank piece to an .insole by means of a con,- tinuous body of hardened cementing and stiffening material comprising a mass of substantial thickness which is located between the shank piece and the insole anda series of stud-like projections formed integrally uponsaid mass which extend intoA the perforations in the shank piece.

Y This bodyof hardened cementing and stiffening `materia1 with 4its stud-like projections not only (o1. afs- 76) to such an extent that it becomes unnecessary to employ a metallic stiffener or other shank stiffeni ing means of a likenature to insure the desired stiffness in the shank portion of the shoe bottom.

My invention. is particularly useful in the manuoverlasted upper margin upon the shank portion of the insole to which the outsole can be cemented and therefore, in the shank portion of the shoe, the outsole is cement-attached only to the shank `reinforcing piece. For use particularly in 'such shoes, as herein illustrated, the continuous body of hardened cementing and stiffening material which secures the reinforcing piece to the insole includes a mass of substantial thickness which overlies the lower side of the reinforcing piece as well as the upper side thereof and which is integrally connected with the mass at the upper side of the reinforcing piece by the stud-like portions which extend through the perforations in the in conjunction with the reinforcing piece either in 115 reinforcing piece. The mass of cementing and, the process of making an insole unit or later in stiffening material between the reinforcing lpiece the `course of the manufacture `of the shoe. and the outsole bonds the outsole directly to the Moreover, in some 4types of shoes undesirable conreinforcing piece in the shank portion of the shoe ditionsmay result because of insufficient security and adds substantially to the stiffness and of attachment of the reinforcing piece to the 2`0 strength ofthe shank portion of the shoe bottom. insole. 1- Y In addition, the shank portion of the outsole is Objects of the present invention are to provide secured directly to the insole by the body of increased strength and stiffness in the shank porcernenting material where the perforations in the tion of a shoe having a reinforced insole of the reinforcing pieceare located. The stud-like portype above referred Ato without the use of a'con- 2,5 tions of the body of cementing material within ventional shank stiffener or similar device and to the perforations in the reinforcing piece areparinsure that the reinforcing means will remain tioularly important in open-shank shoes where, securely attached tothe insole regardless of yany as herein illustrated, the shank reinforcing piece forces tending to separate these elementsduring is of laminated formation because they serve to the wearing of the shoe in which they are incor- 9.5i? tie or bind together the several layers of the reinforcing piece so that they will not separate and thus weaken the attachment of the shank portion around the stud-like members which ll the per- A forations and these fins securely anchor the studlike members in place and-contribute to the security of attachment of the various parts which constitutethe shank portion of the shoe bottom.

The invention will be explained with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 isa bottom plan view of my improved insole unit; L

Fig. 2 is a perspective View of the heel and shank reinforcing piece employed in the insole unit;

Fig. 3 is a view, partially in side elevation and partially in longitudinal section, of a completed open-shank shoe embodying theinsole unit;

Fig. 4 is a bottom plan view of the shoe as it appears before the outsole has been applied;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken along the line V-V of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional View of the completed shoe, the section being taken through the open-shank portion of the-shoe.

Referring to the drawing, my improved sole unit comprises a `full length insole II) and a heel and shank reinforcing piece I2 which is secured to the lower side of the insole, i. e., to the side which is to face the outsole of the shoe. The reinforcing piece I2 is shaped by a die-cutting or other operation to correspond in marginal contour with that of the heel and shank portion of the insole so that the reinforcing piece will be coextensive with' that portionY of the insole when applied thereto. The reinforcing piece may be composed of berboard or other fabricated material and, as shown, it consists of a piece of fabricated sheet material of laminated formation comprising a plurality of layers I4 (Fig. 5) which are more or less firmly held together so as to provide a unitary piece but which; nevertheless, have a distinct tendency to become separated when the piece is subjected 'to strains such as it would be subjected to when in the bottom of a shoe. In order positively to prevent the component layers of the reinforcing piece from separating during the wearing of the shoe, I form in the reinforcing piece a plurality of perforations I6 (Fig. 2), each of which extends entirely through all of the layers, and I introduce into these perforations cementing and stiffening material such as pyroxylin, the material being applied in a softened or activated state, as by means of a brush or the nozzle of a cement applying machine, so

vthat it willcompletelyfill theperforations, Vin

which case it will spread or '.ow outwardly more or less into the areas between the layers in the immediate vicinity of the perforations. Thus, when the material becomes hardened, it will form solid studs or rivet-like members I8 having integral flange-like projections I9 which extend between the layers IIIV so that the layers are securely held or tied together by means of the hardened cementing material in much the same manner as if the layers were riveted together. Advantageously the pyroxylin will be plasticized so that when hardened it will have substantially the resiliency of the usual wood or metal shank stiffener. Preferably, as shown, a row of perforations I6 is formed along each lateralfmargin of the shank piece and advantageously .other perforations may be formed in other portions of the shank piece, as may be found desirable, to increase the security of attachment of the layersl The perforations may be overi-llled with `the cementing material. sol

that the stud-like fillings will overlap more or less the upper and lower sides of -the reinforcing piece and thus function asrivet heads to holdsthe upper and lower layers in place. However, as illustrated', I prefer to apply the cementingand stiifening materialY so that, in addition to filling Vthe perforations, the upper and lower surfaces of thereinforcing piece will be overlaid with cement coatings or layers 20 and 22,lrespectively, as indicated in Figj5. These layers 20 and. 22, as shown, are of substantial thickness, the layer. 20 extending to the'edge of the reinforcing piece while thelayer 22 preferably stops short of the edge to facilitate the application of an edge binding strip to the lower marginal surface of the piece after the piece has been secured to an insole. After a plurality of reinforcing pieces have been prepared as above described and the cementing material applied to each piece has become hardened, a suitable solvent is applied to the layer 20 at the upper side of the piece and also to a hardened coating of the same kind of cement previously applied to the insole and the reinforcing piece is laid in position upon the insole and the parts are placed between appropriately shaped molding forms in a press where the parts are maintained under pressure until the cementing material has hardened and the parts have been firmly and permanently secured together to provide a molded insole unit. The forms will impart the desired amount of longitudinal curvature to the shank portions of the insole and the reinforcing piece so that the shank portion of the insole unit will conform to the longitudinal curvature of the bottom of a foot, the amount of curvature being, for example, as indicated in Fig. 3. The molding forms are also preferably shaped to mold the insole unit transversely as indicated in Fig. 5.

Under thel influence of the molding and attaching pressure the cement coating upon the insole will coalesce with the layer 20 upon the upper surface of the reinforcing piece so that a continuous body of hardened cementing and stiffening material will be provided between the insole and the reinforcing piece, this body extending also into and filling the perforations in the reinforcing piece and overextending the lower surface of the piece. This body of material will serve not only to bind together the component layers of the laminated reinforcing piece and securely to attach the reinforcing piece to the insole, but also, because of its inherent stiffness, it will stiffen and strengthen the shank portion of the insole unit. After the cementng material has hardened and the insole unit has been removed from the press, an edge binding will be applied to the unit to adapt it for use in an open-shank shoe. The edge binding may consist of a strip of suitable binding material, such as the strip 24, and it is applied so as to cover the edges and the adjacent exposed margins of both the insole and the reinforcing piece inthe shank portion of the unit. The binding strip 24 may be secured in place solely by means of adhesive, as indicated in the drawing, or it may be attached by means of stitches. Insole units constructed as above described may be manufactured at reduced cost inasmuch as it is unnecessary to assemble a shank stiffener with the other parts to secure the shank stiffener in place and the resulting insole unit will be exceptionally light in weight and the component parts thereof will be bonded together in such a manner that there will be no liability of their becoming separated during the wearing of the shoe. Moreover, the insole and reinforcing piece having been curved longitudinally and transversely as determined by the shapes of the cooperating surfaces of the molding forms, the body of cementing and stiifening material when hardened will be correspondingly curved and because of its inherent stiffness and the fact that it is coextensive in width and length with that of the insole unit it will serve permanently to retain the curved shape of the unit.

Instead of utilizing pyroxylin as the cementing and stilfening material, I may employ sheet Celluloid or other substances which are capable of rbeing softened into a plastic or semiplastic state and thereafterbecoming hardenedto pro- `vide the desired strength, stiffness andresiliency for reinforcing the shank portion of a shoe so that the curvature thereof will be retained throughout the life of the shoe.

ton or wool ber treated with a cellulose compound, such material becoming plastic, adhesive and readily moldable when subjected to the action of a solvent, such as acetone, and subsequently, upon evaporation of the solvent, hardening into a solid mass which although stiff and strong is also resilient. In using such material, or in using sheet Celluloid, it may be applied in semiplastic sheet form `and forced into the peri5 sole unit the margins of the upper materials are 20 secured in overlasted positions upon the lower side of the insole either on or off a last and thereafter an voutsole 28 is laid and attached to the shoe. As illustrated herein with respect to the manufacture of an open-shank shoe an upper forepart or vamp 3U and a separate back part 32 are assembled with the reinforced insole and the lower margins of these parts are secured in overlasted positions upon the forepart of the insole and upon the heel portion of the reinforcing 3G piece respectively by means of tacks 34. The cementing material upon the lower side of the reinforcing piece is `utilized in attaching the outsole. and preferably the forepart of the outsole is likewise attached by cement. Accordingly,-35 the outsole may be prepared for attachment in v the usual way by having a coating of pyroxylin cement applied to and allowed to dry upon apreviously roughened marginal surface ofthe outsole and likewise a coating of cement isapplied to and allowed to dry upon the overlasted margin of the upper, the latter, however, being present only in the forepart and heel portions of the shoe `if an open-shank shoe isbeing made. Just prior to the attachemnt of the outsole solvent isgfl applied to the cement coatings on the outsole and on the upper and also to the layer of cementing material upon the lower side of the reinforcing piece if that vlayer has been permitted to harden after having been applied. The outsoleL-y is laid in placeupon the shoe bottom and the `shoe is placed in a cement sole attaching press.

'.lfhe'softened cement coating upon the shank portion of the outsole will coalesce with the softened layer or mass of cementing material upon thegig lower side of thereinforcing piece and the shoe is allowed to remain in the press until the plastic mass has hardened. When the shoe is removed from the press, the outsole will besecurely attached by the hardened cement. then attached by means of `nails 38 driven from the inside of the shoe and a sock lining 40 is v cemented in place to cover the foot-facing side of the insole.

In they shank portion of thebottom of the G5 shoe, made as above described, there will be a hardened body of cementing and stifening material extending between the shankreinforcing 'piece and the insole, and vbetween the reinforcing piece and? the outsole, and filling theperforanently securing the reinforcing piece tothe in-, 5

An` example of A5 another such substance comprises a base of cot- A heel 36 isgoo sole andthe outsole to the reinforcing piece as well as binding together the component layers constituting the reinforcing piece so that they y cannotbecome separated during the wear of the shoe or permit the shank portion of the outsole to pull away from the shoe bottom. Because of Vthe hard, stiff wnature of this continuous body Yof material, it stiffens and permanently retains in'foot-conforrning shape the entire shank portion of the shoe bottom so that no conventional shank stiifening means, such as a metallic or wooden shank stiffener, is required to preserve the shape of the shoe bottom, and to provide adequate support for the arched portion of the Y foot. Inasmuoh as the perforations in the reinforcing piece,`which receive portions of the body ofstifiening material, are located principally along the opposite `lateral margins of the shank portion of the piece, the marginal portions of the shoe bottom will be stiffened and bound together so that they will not break `down under the weight of the foot but will be supported much more effectively than they would be in a shoe with a conventional relatively narrow shank stiiener locatedV in the centralshank portion of the `shoe bottom. The present construction is Y particularly useful in open-shank shoes where there is no overlasted upper margin between Vthe shank portions of the vinner andouter soles and where, consequently, there are no metallic or other lasting fastenings extending into the reinforced insole to assist in securing the reinforcing piece to the insole and holding together the layers of the reinforcing piece.

Having described. my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent "of the United States is:

`tions each extending through all of said layers,

and rivet-like members ofhardened cementing material filling said perforations and having,

flange-like `projections extending between said layers in the immediate lvicinity of said perforations.

3. A shank piece comprisingra plurality of lavers of sheet material arranged in face-to-face relation, said piece having a plurality of perforations each extending through all of said layers, and a continuousl body of hardened cementing and stiiening material overlying one side of said piece and lling'sa'id perforationsp 4. A shank piece comprising a plurality of layers of sheet material arranged in face-to-face relation, said piece having a plurality of perforations each extending through all of said layers, and a continuous body of hardened cementing andv stiifening material overlying bothsides of said piece and filling said perforations.

5. An insole unit comprising an insole, a shank reinforcing piece havingl a plurality of perforationsY therein, 'and a continuous body of hardened cementing and stiffening material between I said parts permanently uniting them to provide an insole unit, said body also filling said perforations, thereby providing additional stiffness in the shank'portion of the unit and increasing'the security of attachment of said parts.

6. An insole unit comprising a full length flexible insole, a shank reinforcingl piece having a row of perforations extending along each lateral margin thereof, and a continuous body of aardened cementing and stiiening material between said parts securing them together to provide an insole unit having a flexible forepart and a shank portion of substantial stiffness, said body having projecting portions extending into said perforations, thereby providing additional stiffness Ain the marginal shank portions of the unit and increasing the security of attachment of the reinforcing piece to the insole.

7. An insole unit comprising an insole, a shank reinforcing piece consisting of a plurality of layers of sheet material and having a plurality of perforations each extending lthrough all of said layers, and a continuous body .of pyroxylin cement between the insole and the reinforcing piece securing said parts together, said body eX- tending also into said perforations and between said layers and securing said layers together.

8. A molded insole unit comprising an insole having a longitudinally and transversely curved shank portion, a reinforcing piece coextensive with the shank portion of the insole, said piece being curved to correspond to the curvature of the shank portion of the insole and having a plurality of perforations therein, and a continu ous body of hardened cementing and stiffening material securingV said parts together and preserving their molded form, said body comprising a Vlayer of substantial thickness between the insole and the reinforcing piece and extending throughout the full length and width of the shank portion of the insole, and portions integral with said layer filling said perforations and overextending the outer surface of the reinforcing piece.

9. An insole unit comprising an insole, a plurality of layers of sheet material disposed in face-to-face relation at one side of the shank portion of said insole, each of said layers having a plurality of perforations therein, the perforations in one layer being `alined with corresponding perforations in the next adjacent layer, andra continuous Vbody of hardened cementing and stiffening substance extending between said body also filling the alined perforations in the insole and the adjacent layer of reinforcing material and securing said parts together, said layers and extending between said layers in the immediate vicinity of said perforations, thereby securing said layers to one another and to the insole.

10. An insole unit for use in open-shank shoes comprising an insole, a shank reinforcing piece coextensive in widthv and length' with that of the shankY portion of the insole secured to one -fside of the insole and having a row of perforations extending lengthwise of said piece in each marginal portion thereof, and a layer of hardened cementing and stiffening material between the insole and the reinforcing piece, said layer having projections formed integrally therewith and extending into said perforations.

11. An insole unit for use in open-shank shoes comprising an insole, a shank reinforcing piece coextensive in width and length with that of the shank portion of the insole secured to one side of the insole and having a row of perforations extending lengthwise of said piece in each marginal portion thereof, an edge binding covering the edges of said piece and the insole and overlying the adjacent outer surface portions of these parts, a layer of hardened cementing and stiifening material covering the lower side of said piece inwardly of said edge binding, a layer of said material between said piece and the insole securing said parts together, and stud-like filler members integral with the material of each of said layers extending through the perforations in said piece.

12. A shoe comprising an insole, a heel and shank reinforcing piecelocated beneath the insole and having a plurality of perforations in its shank portion, an upper having its lower margin secured in overlasted position upon the insole, an outsole, a continuous body lof hardened cementing and stiifening material extending through the perforations in the reinforcing piece and extending between the reinforcing piece and the insole and between the reinforcing piece and the outsole for bonding said parts together and stiifening the shank portion of the shoe bottom, and means for securing the outsole to the shoe in the forepart and heel portions thereof.

13. An open-shank shoe comprising an insole, a heel and shank reinforcing piece located beneath theinsole and having a plurality lof perforations in its shank portion, a two-part upr per consisting of .a forepart having its lower margin secured in overlasted position upon the insole and a back'part having its lower margin secured in overlasted position upon said rein- Yforcing piece, an outsole, a layer of hardened cementing and stiffening material between the iinsole and the shank portion of the reinforcing piece securing said parts together, a layer of said material between the reinforcing piece and the outsole securing said parts together, studs of said material filling the apertures in the reinforcing piece and integrally connecting said layers to provide a continuous body of said material stiifening the shank portion of the shoe bottom, and means for securing the outsole to tl'ie shoe in the forepart and heel portions thereo HORATIO S. LYNESS.

p CERTIFICATE oF CORRECTION. Patent'x. 2,294,850. Junera, 19m.

' HoRATIo s. LYNESS.l

Itis'hereb'y certified that error appears in the printed specification ofthe above numbered patent requiring correotionas follows: Page LL, first colimm, line 52, claim 9, strike out "said body also fillingV the alined perforations in" and insert the same .after "together," in line 51|., same claim; and\that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction-therein that the same may confom; to the record of the case in the Patent Office. l

Signed and sealed this" lith day of August, JK..- D. 1914.2,

Henry -Van `Arsdsile `(Seal)v Acting Commissioner 'of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5452526 *Dec 22, 1993Sep 26, 1995Trisport LimitedFootwear having an outsole stiffener
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/76.00R
International ClassificationA43B13/41, A43B13/38
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/41
European ClassificationA43B13/41