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Publication numberUS2284872 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1942
Filing dateMar 23, 1939
Priority dateMar 23, 1939
Publication numberUS 2284872 A, US 2284872A, US-A-2284872, US2284872 A, US2284872A
InventorsEdward T Jaeger, Jr Rupert Loeffler, Bischoff Louis
Original AssigneeOneida Paper Products Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for forming windowed apertures
US 2284872 A
Abstract  available in
Images(13)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2, 1942. E. 'r. JAEGER ETAL 2,284,872

MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES Filed March 23, 1959 15 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS. Huperf LoefflqrJr. Lou/.5 Bischo/f' ATTORNEYS.

June 2, 1942.

E. 'r. JAEGE R ETAL MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES FiledMarch 23, 1959 13 Sheets-Sheet 2 Lo s Blschof'f" y E dwardT M ATTORNEYS June 2, 1942. E. 1'. JAEGER ETAL MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES I Filed March 23, 1939 13 Sheets-Shet 3 J1me 1942- E. 1'. JAEGEl i z-rm. 2,234,372

MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES Filed March 23, 1939 13 Sheets-Sheet 4 1N VENTORS.

ATTORNEYS.

June 2, 1942. E. TQJAEGER ETAL 2,234,372

MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES FiledMarch 23, 1939 l3 Sheets-Sheet 5 E l h "In!" Q BY EdwardZ'Ja er W ouw ATTORNEYS:

June 2, 1942. E. 'r. JAEGER ETAL MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES Filed'March 23, 1939 13 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTORS. Rupert- Loe'ff'ler'Jl: Louis Bl'schoff BY W Edward)? eger M w 144 ATTORNEYS.

June 2, 1942. E. T. JAEGER ETAL MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES Filed March 25. 1939 13 Sheets-Sheet 7 INVENTORS fiu erf Loeff'ler J'r. Lou/s B/schof'f' Edward Fig18 June 2, 1942. i E. T. JAEGER ETAL MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES Filed March23, 1939 13 Sheets-Sheet 8 INXENgQ/RSlI Ru er!" 0e 1: Lofiis Else/10; EdwardZ'Jaeger ATTORNEYS,

June 2, 1942. E. T. JAEGER ET AL MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES Filed March 25, 1939 1s Sheets-Sheet 9 fiup Lou/s BLsch W Edwar June 2, 1942. E. 'r. JAEGER ETAL MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES 13 Sheets-Sheet 1o Filed March 23, 1939 5 -lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllvilli/14g n 1,.

INVENTORS. Ruperl' Loeff/erfi: Lou/s B/schoff' BY WW rfaeger' 9'- M ATTORNEYS.

June 1942- E. 1'. JAEG'ER ETAL 2,284,872

MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES Filed March 23, 1939 1-3 Sheets-Sheet 12 807 J04 6 5%: as 85 I I v fl-Ill INVENTORS Rupert LoeffZer-Jn Louis Bischof'f EdwardZ'Jaeger ATTORNEYS.

Patented Junc z,

MEANS FOR FORMING WINDOWED APERTURES Edward T. Jaegcr, Rupert Loefller, Jr., and Louis Bischoft, New York, N. Y., assign ore to Oneida Paper Products, Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application March 23, 1939, Serial No. 263,648

8 Claims.

This invention relates to apparatus and means for the formation of sheets, bags or containers of various kinds, and particularly relates to apparatus for forming transparent windows or other openings in a continuous web of material, such web being thereafter used for the formation of the aforementioned articles.

In the formation of transparent openings in a continuousweb, it is necessary first to exercise a portion of the material forming the opening and thereafter, to cover such opening with a patch of transparent material including transparent regenerated cellulose material such as Cellophane, Sylph-wrap or the like.

Where a continuous web of sheet material such as paper or other substance is to be thus provided with a series of transparent windows or openings, the web to be thereafter cut up and formed as may be desired, there has heretofore been difficulty in providing means for cutting the opening without interfering with the movement of the web of sheet material or without tearing any portion of such web. Various means such as, for instance, halting the progress of the web at the moment the cut is made or providing a I the web to permit the cutting operation to take place, then extreme difllculty is experienced in obtaining proper register of the edges of the sheets in relation to the cut-out or perforation to be made. The necessary sudden cessation of movement of the web and the sudden recurrence of movement thereof often tends to wrinkle and distort the sheet so that the cut-out or perforation may be irregular or the sheet itself may be torn or distorted.

In the case of a machine having a cutting knife in a rotating cylinder, it may be necessary to use the same size slot on a bag or sheet of different lengths. This cannot be done unless the rotating cutting knife cylinder is changed to the required diameter for each length of bag or sheet. Therefore, no unanticipated sizes could be quickly manufactured owing to the necessity for first making a cutting cylinder having a circumference exactly equal to the new sizes desired.

Objects of this invention. therefore are to provide in an apparatus for forming an opening or a transparent window in sheet material, means whereby a continuous web of such sheet material may be cut, perforated or slotted with openings of predetermined size and in predetermined relation to each other without any variation in the speed or movement of the web of sheet material.

Further objects of this invention are to provide means for varying the distance between cutouts, perforations or slots formed in a continuous web of sheet material without the necessity for any change in the mechanism forming the cutouts, without any requirement for additional special or multiple parts for such mechanism (such parts being substantialduplicates for each other except as to size) and without the necessity for continually stopping, altering and adjusting the machine.

Heretofore it has been extremely diflicult in the manufacture of transparent openings in sheet-material to perform the operation of cutting the opening and ailixing the transparent material at the opening in a single continuous automatic operation. Difficulties have arisen in registering the cut-out portion exactly with the transparent material to be applied over such cutout. Further difliculties have arisen owing to the fact that the transparent material to be applied over the opening was to be applied in patches, that is, in cut-off lengths; while the web upon which such patches were to be applied was a continuous moving sheet.

Accordingly, further objects of this invention are to provide apparatus by means of which the continuously moving web may, after it has been slotted or perforated or after the cut has been performed, have such cut-out covered by a transparent patch without any interruption of the operation or without any necessity for manual manipulation.

Still further objects of' this invention are so to arrange the mechanism that, instead of the necessity for applying a series of patches upon the material surrounding the cut-out or perforation, the material forming the transparent window may be supplied to the machine in a continuous roll, the machine cutting patches from such continuous roll and causing such patches to adhere to the material surrounding the cut-out in a fully automatic operation.

Another object of this invention is so to construct the mechanism which applies the transparent patch to the cut-out as to provide simplified means for quickly changing either the length of the patch to be applied or the distance between the patches applied in accordance with any variations in the size of slot or cut-out and/or the distance between such cut-outs.

Other objects of this invention are to eliminate the changing of dies or knives, where the same Figure 2 is a corresponding side elevational view of the mechanism of Figure 1 taken on the opposite side of the mechanism.

Figure 2a corresponds to Figure 2 and is a schematic perspective representation of the various parts of the mechanism.

Figure 3 is a top elevational view of the mechanism of Figure 2 taken along the line 33 of Figure 2, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 4 is a top elevational view of the mechanism of Figure 2 taken along the line 4-4 of Figure 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 5 is a sectional elevation taken along the line 5-5 of Figure 3 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 6 is a sectional elevation taken along 6-6 of Figure 5 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 7 is a sectional elevation taken along the lines of Figure 6 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 8 is a sectional elevation taken on the lines 8-8 of Figure 3 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 9 is a sectional view taken along 9-9 of Figure 8 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 10 is a fragmentary view of a modified form of the oscillating mechanism of the punching means and corresponds to the members I58 and I43 of Figure 5.

Figure 11 is a fragmentary end view of one form of the oscillating means of Figure 10 and corresponds -to the members I58 and I43 of Figure 8.

Figure 12 is a sectional elevational taken along the lines l2-I2 of Figure 8 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 13 is a cross-sectional taken along l3| 3 of Figure 10 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 14 is a cross sectional view taken along the line I4-l4 of Figure 10 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 15 is a sectional elevation taken along the lines l5|5 of Figure 4.

Figure 16 is fragmentary view of Figure 15 showing the clutch or coupling in further detail.

Figure 1'7 is a sectional view taken on the line I'L-H of Figure 3 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 18 is a cross sectional view taken along lines |8l8 of Figure 2.

Figure 19 is a sectional view taken along the lines l9l 9 of Figure 18.

Figure 20 corresponds to Figure 19 showing the mechanism thereof in a different position to be hereinafter explained.

Figure 21 is a cross sectional view of the cutting mechanism taken on 2l2l of Figure 4.

Figure 22 is an elevational view of the suction roller taken along the line 2222 of Figure 21.

Figure 23 is a cross sectional view taken along 23-23 of Figure 22.

Figure 24 is a cross sectional view taken along 24-24 of Figure 22.

Figure 25 is a cross sectional view along lines 25-25 of Figure 23.

Figure 26 is a cross sectional view along 26-26 of Figure 23.

Figure 27 is a sectional elevation taken along 2'|--2| of Figure 4.

Figure 28 is a sectional elevation taken along 2828 of Figure 1.

Figure 29 is a sectional elevation taken along line 2929 of Figure 1.

Figure 30 is an elevational view taken along 30-30 of Figure 1.

Figure 31 is a cross sectional view taken along 3l3l of Figure 8. t

Figure 32 is a cross sectional view taken along 32-32 of Figure 10.

Figure 33 illustrates a continuous web having a transparent window formed therein.

Figure 33a shows said web cut and folded to produce the bag of Figure 34.

Referring now to Figures 1, 2 and 2a, the main roll of sheet material 50, in which transparent windows are to be formed, is mounted upon rollers 5| which in turnare mounted in the bifurcated member 52 and is free to rotate therein.

The sheet material or web 53 may be threaded through the machine in various different ways. The machine here illustrated provides for at least three operations, to wit: The printing of the main web, the perforation or cutting out of an opening therein thereof, and the application of a transparent sheet or patch at the perforated or cut-out point. These operations may be performed in any desired order, or certain of these operations may be omitted. The order in which these operations are performed is determined by the manner in which the paper or sheet 53 taken from the roll 50 is threaded through the various portions of the machine.

It should be noted that, in the description hereinafter set forth, the printing rolls or mechanism are not an essential part of the machine; but are shown schematically in their relation to the machine which comprises the invention herein.

In many cases, it is desirable merely to effect the cut-out, apply the transparent patch thereon and reserve any printing operation for any later manufacturing operation that may be necessary. In the event that it is so desired merely to form the window without any printing matter whatsoever upon the sheet, itself, the web 53 is threaded along the path A (indicated by dotted lines) past the idling roller 54 whereby the direction of the moving sheet is changed. The direction of the moving sheet is again changed by the idling roller 55 directly above the roller 54 and the web 53 then is moved past the feed roller 56 whence it travels over the idler 51 and into and through the punching mechanism 58.

Owing to the fact that the web or sheet 53 must pass through various different processes and apparatus in its passage through the ma, chine itself, it is necessary especially where the web is not of great tensile strength to provide feed rollers giving it a forward impetus in its various movements, rather than to rely merely on the pull at the end of the web as it emerges from the machine. For this purpose, the roller 56 is not an idling roller but a driven one as hereinafter described.

The machine itself is driven by means of the belt 59 which is connected with any desired motive power and which drives the pulley 68. The pulley'68 in turn drives the shaft 6| which in turn causes the pinion 62 to rotate thus driving the gear 63 which through the bevel gears 64 and 65 causes the shaft 66 to rotate in its bearings 61, 61, friction being greatly reduced by the thrust bearings 68, 68. l I

The bevel gear 69 at the opposite end of the shaft 66 meshes with the bevel gear 18 which thus causes the shaft 1| to rotate. The rotation of shaft 1| drives the change gear wheel 12 which in turn drives the idling gear wheel 13 which drives the gear wheel 14 whereby the gear wheel 15 is rotated, thereby rotating the shaft 16 and thus causing the rubber roller 11 to rotate. The roller 56 is mounted on the shaft 18 (see also Figure 1) which is rotated by the gear wheel 14.

Thus the feed roller56 and the corresponding roller 11 capture the web' of sheet material 53 between them and cause the web to move on towards the punching mechanism 58.

Where printing rolls are to be used, gear 19 driven by shaft 18 drives idler 88 which is free to turn on shaft 1|. Sprocket 588 attached to gear 88 drives the printing rolls 58l through the sprocket chain 582. It will thus be clear that any change in the speed of the feed rolls will result in a change of speed of the printing rolls.

Where it is necessary to thread the web of sheet material 53 through the rollers 56 and 11,

ting the ready insertion and threading through of the web 53. Such means for raising the rubber roller 11 comprises slidable mountings 83, 83 (Figures 18, 19 and 20) for the shaft 16. Such slideable mountings 83 are captured within'the stationary member 84 (Figures 19 and 20) said stationary member 84 having slots 85, 85 within which the slidable mounting 83 may travel.

The slidable mounting does not rest directly upon the interior base 86 of the stationary member 89 but a coil spring 81 under compression is provided between the base 86 and the slidable mounting 83. The upper end of the slidable mounting 83 is provided with a series of bevel studs 88, 88 separated from each other by spaces approximately equal to or greater than their diameter. As seen in Figures 19 and 20, it will be obvious that the depression of the slidable mounting 83 will cause the rubber roller 11 to more closely approach the feed roller 56 while a raising of the slidable mounting 83, as seen in Figure 20, will correspondingly cause the gap 8| between the rubber roller 11 and the roller 56 to increase and provide sufficient space for the threading of the paper. Since the spring 81 is a compression spring, in its normal condition, it would tend to maintain the slidable member 83 at or near the uppermost part of the member 84 thus tending, when the pressure on such spring is released, to drive the rollers 11 and 56 apart. The compression spring 81 is maintained under compression, however, by the fact that bevel studs 89 mounted upon the rotatable member 98 register end to end and press against the bevel studs 88 of the slidable mounting 83 (as in Figure 19). When the rotatable member 98 is turned upon its shaft 9| so that the upper bevel 'studs 69 no longer register end to end with the roller bevel studs 88 but instead register with the spaces between them, then the slidable mounting 83 is forced up by compression spring 81, a distance equal to the axial length of on set of bevel studs until the studs bear against the base of the opposite member, and the rollers 11 and 56 are separated. In order to facilitate the rotation of the shaft 9| and the consequent rotation of the rotatable member 98 and its associated bevel studs 89, a handle 92 is attached to the rotatable shaft 9| by means of the collar 93.

Since the shaft 16 extends from one side to the other of the machine, the mountings 82 on each side of the machine as seen especially in Figure 18 are exactly similar and the turning of the two corresponding handles 92 simultaneously will cause the shaft 16 to rise evenly and in the same plane and will thus cause the rubber roller 11 to rise.

In order to insure that the handles 92, 92 on either side of the shaft 16 will be rotated simultaneously so that the shaft will rise evenly and in the same plane, a link 94 is mounted between the two handles 92, 92 and is hingedly connected to each handle by pivots 95, 95. It will thus be obvious that rotation of either handle 92 will through the link 94 communicate the same motion to the corresponding handle at the opposite end and will thus cause both ends of the shaft 16 to rise simultaneously. Likewise the provision of the link 94 makes it possible to cause the shaft to rise by manipulating either of the handles 92 or even by grasping any portion of the link 94 causing it to move in the desired direction.

After the paper or web is properly threaded through the gap 8| (Figure 20), then the handles 92 or the link 94 may be rotated or pushed in a direction opposite to that in which they had previously been moved and the shaft 16 and its rubber rollers 11 will thereby be depressed and will engage the web 53 between the rollers 11 and 56. The bevel studs 88 and 89 are so arranged that lateral pressure of a stud on one member against a stud on an adjacent member will cause the stud on the movable member 83 to slide down, thus causing the movable member 83 to slide down and thus causing the studs to register with each other endto end rather than side to side. The bevelling of the studs must therefore be at such angle or curvature as to permit this slidin arrangement to take place.

The rollers 56 and 11 thus feed the paper forward over the idling roller 51 into the punching mechanism 58.

Although we have here described in detail one way of separating the feed rollers to permit threading of the web through the machine, it of course will be clear that any other suitable means may be used which will separate such rollers for threading purposes and then bring them together to perform the feeding operation.

The punching mechanism (see Figures 2, 5 and 8) comprises a movable platform 96 which is mounted at either lateral edge thereof upon free rollers 91 (see also Figures 6 and 7) which in turn are mounted in a truck 98. The free rollers 91 thus carry the movable platform 96 upon the upper portions of the rim thereof, the lower portions of the rollers 91 riding in the track 99 which is attached by the bracket I88 to the frame I81. A rack 182 is also mounted beneath the movable platform along the lateral ends thereof, said rack being mounted immediately above a corresponding rack I03 which is mounted in the bracket I00. A pinion I04 is rotatably enmeshed between the two racks I02 and I03 and thus assures that the movable platform 96 will at all times register accurately with the mounting bracket I00, the free rollers 91 being provided merely for the purpose of reducing friction.

The movable platform 96 carries, securely at tached thereto, the vertically arranged arms I05 and I06 (see Fig. 8). V-shaped tracks or slots I01-I08 are mounted in the lateral edges of the upper ends of each of the arms I05 and I06 (see Figures 8 and 9). The punching plate I09, Figure 8, is mounted upon a slidable member H0, the ends of which III, III (see also Fig. 9) are shaped to ride in the tracks I01 and I08. Upward and downward reciprocating motion of the slidable member H in the tracks I01 will obviously result in corresponding upward and down ward motion of the punching plate I09. Such reciprocating motion is accomplished in the following manner: Brackets H2, H2 are securely attached to the upper end of the arm I06, I06. Shaft II3 rotates in a manner hereinafter described in the bearings H4, H4 which are carried by the brackets I I2, II2; cam H5 is mounted at one end of shaft H3 and thus rotates therewith. A link I I6 is rotatably attached to the cam II5 by the eye H1. The opposite end of the link H6 is rotatably attached by means of the yoke IIO to the slidable member IIO. A slot II9 permits the link I I6 to pass through the upper covering I of the chamber I2I in which the slidable member rises and falls.

It will now be obvious that rotation of the shaft H3 and the corresponding rotation of the cam II5 will, through the rotatable eye II1, cause the link II6 to reciprocate vertically and thereby cause the slidable member IIO to correspondingly move up and down thus causing the punching plate I09 to operate.

A counter-weight I22 may be mounted on the shaft I I3 to compensate for the weight of the sliding member II 0 and its associated punching plate and to avoid any vibration or friction which may occur due to the weight on the cam II5.

An opening I23 is formed in the movable platform 96 and a plate I24 is secured to said platform 96 surrounding said opening I23 and having also an opening I25 surrounded by the female die I26 which exactly matches the punching plate I09. It will now be obvious that when the moving web 53 passes beneath the punching plate I09 and over the die I26 a perforation will be made in the web 53 by the pressing down of the punching plate I09 into the die I26, owing to the rotation of the cam H5, and the material I21 thereby excised will be thrown down into the funnel I28.

In order to ensure that the material I21 will be pressed down and away from the cutting edges of the die I26, small plungers I29, I29 may be mounted on the under surface of the punching plate I09, the ends of the plungers being forced to' project beyond the face of the punching plate by the springs I30. By this means, the plungers I29 will press against the center portion of the material I 21 to be excised but nevertheless the springs I30 will permit such pressure to be a yielding and light pressure which will not tear the paper web 53; but when the material I21 has been cut from the web 53 by the operation of the punching plate I09 and the die I26, the compression of the springs I30 will permit the plungers I29 to be extruded from the face of the punching plate I09 and thus force the material I21 away from the edges of the die I26 so that the cutting edges will be free to receive the punching plate when the next perforation is made.

The web of sheet material 53 may be held perfectly flat, during the cutting operation and during all of the time that the punching p ate I09 is beyond the surface of web 53, by means of a. plate I3I which may be provided near the under face of the punching plate I09; said plate I3I having an orifice I32 which is slightly larger in each dimension that the corresponding dimension of the punching plate. The said plate is mounted upon the slidable mounting IIO by means of the springs I33. When the slidable member H0 is forced downwardly by the action of the cam II5, the plate I 3| will come in contact with the web 53 either simultaneously with or before the face of the punching plate I09 and will thereby press the paper against the upper surface of the die I26 and thus prevent any breaking, tearing or distortion which may be caused by the subsequent entry of the punching plate I09 through the paper 53 and into the die I26. When the slidable member IIO thereafter begins to rise and withdraw punching plate I09, the plate I3I will nevertheless remain in contact with the web 53, pressing it against the outer surface of the die I26 at least until the punching plate I09 is fully withdrawn from the die I26 and from the outer surface of the web 53. By this means, any stresses or strains at that portion of the paper which is being cut is completely limited to that portion of the web alone and is not transmitted to any other portion of the web, and thus does not interfere with the motion of the web or with the smoothness of the movement thereof.

The punching mechanism as a whole is mounted on the movable platform 96 for the purpose of permitting the punching plate I09 and the die I26 to travel with the web 53 at the same speed as the web during the cutting operation, that is, during the period that the punching plate is beyond and beneath the upper surface of the web 53. The movable platform is thus so arranged that during the period immediately before the cutting operation is to take place, the entire punching mechanism is in the position shown by the dotted lines of Figure 5; and thereafter, during the cutting operation, the entire punching mechanism travels on its platform 96 to the position shown by the solid lines of Figure 5 and even beyond if necessary, simultaneously making the perforation or incision required and then rising from surface of the web. The web is thus perforated as it travels along and it is not necessary to stop the motion of the web in order to perform the perforating operation. Likewise, the mounting of the punching mechanism on the movable platform 96 is such that immediately after the perforating operation takes place, the entire punching mechanism may be returned to the position shown by the dotted lines of Figure 5 in order that it be ready for the next punching operation.

One form of mechanism by which this oscillatory movement of the platform 96 is accomplished is shown in Figure 2 at I34 and in Figures 5 and 8 and especially Figures 15 and 16. A gear wheel I35 is rotatably mounted on the shaft 6| in such manner that rotation of shaft 6| will not necessarily cause rotation of said gear wheel. A clutch mechanism 600 (Figs. 15 and 16) is so arranged, however, that a pull on the handle 60I it serves as a safety device are hereinafter described. The bevel gear I mounted at the oppositeend of the shaft I38 drives the bevel gear I42 which in turn drives the shaft I43 (see also Fig. 8). The shaft I43 rotates in the bearings I44 and I45, the latter bearing I45 being mounted on the post I46. An armI41 (see Figs. and 8) is fixedly attached to the opposite end of the rotating shaft I43 and rotates therewith. The

' said arm' I41 (see particularly Fig. 5) has a slot I48 at the free end thereof. 'A glider I49 is mounted on the end of the arm I41 by means of the shaft I50 and the washer I5I, said shaft extending from the glider I49 through the slot I48 and to the washer I5I, the edges of the slot I41 being captured between the sides of the glider I49 and the washer I5I. The said washer is held in place on its shaft by the nut I52.

It will now be clear that rotation of the shaft I43 as before described, will cause the rotatable arm I41 to rotate and will thus likewise cause the glider I49 to rotate therewith, the glider belng free, however, to oscillate within the slot I48.

The shaft I50 extends through the glider I49 to the opposite side thereof into the annular groove I53 (see particularly Fig. 8 as well as Fig. 5) which is formed in the circular plate I54 (see also Figures 12 and 31), said circular plate I54 being supported in fixed unrotatable position by the bar I55 carried by the post I56. The end of the shaft I50 projecting into the annular groove I53 carries, at that portion which rides within said annular groove, a rotatable wheel I51, said rotatable wheel I51 providing a friction reducing bearing surface between the shaft I50 and the sides of the annular groove I53. It will now be clear that as the rotatable arm I41 turns, the glider I49 turns with it but by reason of the freedom allowed to it by its mounting in the slot I48, the said glider in its rotation is free to be guided by the wheel I51 as it rides in the annular groove I53 and thus follows a path given it by the annular groove. A slotted arm I58 is pivotally attached by means of the yoke I59 to the under side of the movable platform 96 at I60, I60. Said slotted arm is also pivoted about the shaft I6I by means hereinafter described. I

The lower end of the slotted arm is captured by the glider I49. The glider I49 as seen in Figures 5 and 8, has two rail portions I62, I63 surrounded by the lips I64; the glider I49 rides within the slot I65 of the arm I58, the rails I62 and I63 engaging the sides I66, I66 of the slot I65, the lips I64, I64 capturing the sides I61, I61 between them. i

The pivotal mounting of the arm I58 on the shaft I6I above referred to is a slidable one effected by the glider I68. The glider I68 has rails I69, I and corresponding lips "I which cooperate to capture the sides I61 of the movable arm in the same manner as the rails and lips of the glider I49. The glider I68 is free to rotate about the shaft I6I but the shaft I6 I is fixedly mounted in its bearings I12, I12 and does not permit any other motion than that of simple rotation by the glider I68. It will now be clear that rotation ofthe arm I41 will cause a corresponding rotation of the glider I49. The movement ofthe glider I49 will be controlled however, not only by the rotatable arm I41 and the slot thereof I48, but also by the path followed by the wheel I51 in the annular groove I53; so that with respect to the rotatable arm and its slot if the annular groove is slightly eccentric, then the glider I49 will slide back and forth in the slot I48.

The rotation of the glider with the rotatable arm I41 and the path followed by the glider owing to the mounting of the wheel I51 in the anular groove I53 ,will cause a corresponding movement of the lowerportion of the slotted arm I58. Thus, when the rotatable arm has rotated from the position shown by the solid lines of Figure 5 through an arc of 180 to the position shown by the dotted lines therein, the lower end, of the slotted arm I58 will have been also moved to the position shown by the dotted lines. Since the slotted arm I56 is also, pivoted about the glider I69 as a fulcrum then the opposite end of the slotted arm comprising the yoke I59 will have been moved in a direction opposite to that in which the lower end of the slotted arm was moved by the operation of the glider I49. Since the yoke I59 of the slot arm I58 is attached at I to the movable platform 96, any motion of the said slotted arm will be transmitted through said yoke and means of attachment to said movable platformand therefore any oscillatory movement of the slotted arm I58 will be reflected by exactly similar movement of the movable platform 96 and corresponding movement of the entire punching mechanism 56. The free mountings comprising slot I of the slotted arm I58 and the gliders I49 and I68 are provided, rather than fixed mountings, since the upper end of the slotted arm I58 at I60 is not free to rotate in a circular arc but is required at all times by its attachment to platform 96 to move in a single plane. In order, therefore, to permit suchmovement of the end of the slotted arm in a single plane while at the same time oscillating such arm about a fulcrum at I68 it is necessary to permit the arm to move relative to said fulcrum. Likewise, the slot I65 and the glider I49 are required since the rotary motion of the arm I41 is to be converted into oscillatory motion of the slotted arm I58 and a sliding of the glider I49 back and forthwith respect to the fulcrum of the arm I58 is thereby made necessary.

It is now apparent that rotation of the shaft I43 produces by means of the arm I41 and the slotted arm I56, a corresponding oscillatory movement of the movable platform 96 and of the punching mechanism 58. The speed of oscillation of the movable platform 96 and of the entire punching mechanism 58 may be varied and adjusted byvariations in the plate I54 and the annular groove I53 and the distance between perforations or cut-outs made by punching. plate upon the moving web 53 may be varied by varying the diameter of the circular plate I54 and the diameter of the annular groove I53 so that the distance covered by the platform 96 during each oscillation of the slotted arm I58 and the corresponding oscillation of the movable platform 96 will be increased or decreased with respect to the moving web 53 and .thus space the perforations or cut-outs at a correspondingly different dis-.

tance from each other. The perforations or cutouts may thus be placed in series closer to or at a greater distance from each other by a corresponding operation of reducing or increasing the diameter of the circular plate I54. For this purpose, a series of circular plates I54 having varying diameters must be provided.

The necessity for such a series of circular plates may be obviated by another improved expedient associated with the rotatable arm I41 hereinafter to be described.

The movement of the yoke portion I59 of the slotted arm I58 and the corresponding movement of the movable platform 96 may be varied during a single stroke so that the platform will move at the speed of the paper while the punching plate I09 is in contact with the web 53 and at other speeds as may be desired while the punching plate is not in contact with the web 53. This may be accomplished by an eccentricity in the annular groove I53, such eccentricity being placed for instance at I13 (Figs. and 12) and permitting variations in the speed of movement of the wheel I51 by reason of the fact that the effective radius of rotation of said wheel I51 about the shaft I43 will be varied by the forcing of said wheel by the annular groove either closer to the shaft I43 or further away from it. Thus when the wheel I51 is traveling in the portion I13 of the annular groove I53, its speed will be decreased, the decrease of speed being a function of the relation ship of the radius at I13 to the radius a the annular groove at other portions thereof. Therefore, while the movable platform 96 is being thrust forward, the speed thereof will be less than that of said platform during the return but will be equal to that of the web 53. Care must however be taken that the formation of the annular groove I53 is such that at all'times during the forward thrust of the entire punching mechanism 58, the speed thereof is the same as that of the web 53. The variation in speed of the return of the punching mechanism by reason of the eccentricity of the annular groove I53 thus provides for a resetting of the punching mechanism at the proper time and in the proper place for the next perforating operation.

In a preferred form of activating means for the slotted arm I58, it is possible to omit entirely the circular plate I54 and the annular groove I53. This form is shown in Figures 10, 11, 13 and 14 in which the rotating shaft I43, Figures and 11, which corresponds exactly to the rotating shaft I43 of Figure 8, has mounted at the other end thereof, a rotating arm I14 which corresponds to the rotating arm I41 of Figure 5. The shaft I43 is rotated in exactly the same manner as the shaft I43 of Figure 8 and the rotatable arm I14 securely aflixed thereto is likewise rotated thereby. v

A glider I15 similar in operation to the glider I49 is pivotally mounted at the end of the rotatable arm I14 and the rails thereof I16, I11 capture the sides I81, I81 of the slotted arm I58 in exactly the same manner. Likewise the piv-v otal mounting of the oscillating arm I58 about its fulcrum isaccomplished by the glider I68 which corresponds to the same member in Figures 5 and 8 and is pivotally mounted on thefixed shaft IGI.

The difference between the form thus illustrated in Figures 10 and 11 and that illustrated in Figures 5, 8 and 12 is that the speed of movement of the slotted arm and the corresponding speed of movement of the entire punching mechanism 58 is not varied at any time during the period of operation, said speed being at all times a constant one.

It has been found by experiment that variations in the speed of movement of the punching mechanism, varying its oscillating period, are for most purposes both unnecessary and exceedingly difiicult to make; and that it is much simpler to cause the slotted arm and the corresponding platform 96 to move continuously at all times at the same speed as the web 53.

Any variation in the distance between successive perforations or cut-outs may be accomplished by variations in the radius or length of the rotating arm I14 and corresponding changes in the period of the oscillation of the punching mechanism 58.

The preferred form shown in Figures 10 and 11 lends itself readily to variations in the speed of oscillation of the punching mechanism 58 without any difliculty or complicated adjustment.

Since, as has been above pointed out, the speed of oscillation of the movable platform 86 may be changed by changing the effective radius of rotation of the arm I14 (Figure 10), that is, by bringing-the pivoted portion I18 of the glider I15 closerto the shaft I43 or further away therefrom, then any means associated with the rotating arm I14 which will cause said pivoted portion I18 and therefore the glider I15 to move either towards or away from the shaft I43 will be just as effective as changing the length of the rotating arm I14 and will necessarily change the speed of oscillation of the punching mechanism 58.

This may be readily accomplished by the apparatus shown in dotted lines in Figure 10 and in the cross-sectional view of Figure 32 wherein (see Figures 13, 14 and 32) the pivoted portion I18 of the glider I15 is secured to a block I19 which is threaded at I88. T'he'block I19 is free to slide within the channel I8I (Figures 13 and 32) of the rotatable arm I14. A block I82 is fixedly secured by means of the bolts I83 (Figures 14 and 32) within the channel I8I and to the body I14 of the rotatable arm. Said block I8! is perforated at I84. A bolt I85 having a head I86 isinserted through the perforation I84, its movement relative to the perforation being impeded by the bearings I 81 and I88. The opposite end of the bolt I85 is threaded at I89, the threads ISIS being so formed as to match exactly with the threads I80. The head I86 of: the bolt rotation by a tool of the head I86 will cause a corresponding rotation of the bolt I85 thereby turning the threaded portion I89 thereof which will in turn cause the block I19 to move in a direction corresponding to the direction of rotation and which will thereby move the pivoted portion I18 along the rotatable arm I14 changing its distance from the rotating shaft I43 thus changing the effective radius of rotation between the mounting of the rotatable arm I14 on its shaft and the glider-pivot I18 and the period and speed of oscillation of the movable platform 96 and the punching mechanism 58.

It is of course necessary to synchronize the operation of the punching plate I 69 of the punching mechanism 58 with the oscillatory movement of'the entire punching mechanism. To this end fasjhas been'heretofore described, the punching plate I69 is 'mountednpon a slide III) which is stroke of the slide IIO of the punchingplate I09 be simultaneous with the forward motion of the punching mechanism 58 and should be completed before the return of the punching mechanism 58 commences. It thus becomes extremely useful to drive the punching plate itself from. the same source of power that creates the oscillatory movement of the entire punching mechanism 58 and it is desirable to simplify the operation of making any necessary variations in the speed of oscillation of the punching plate I09 when the speed of oscillation of the entire punching mechanism 58 is changed.

Accordingly, the shaft I38 which drives the oscillating mechanism of the entire punching member58 also drives the shaft I by means of the bevel gears 202 and 203, the said shaft rotating in the bearings 204 and 205, the friction upon the shaft being minimized by the thrust bearing 205 (see Figures 2 and 8). The bevel gear 201 at the opposite end of the shaft 20I drives the bevel gear 208 which in turn drives the concentrically arranged gear wheel 209 which, through the idler 2I0, drives the gear wheel 2 which is mounted on the shaft 2I2, a spiralgear 213 being mounted also on said shaft 2I2 (see Figures 2 and 8).

The rotation of shaft 20, therefore, through the gear train 201-2 II thereby drives and causes the spiral gear 2 I3 to rotate. The spiral gear 2 I3 and its shaft 2I2 is mounted in the bearings 2H, 2 which in turn are supported on the posts 2I5, 2I5 which are fixedly supported by means of the bracket 2I6 on the frame of the machine so that the spiral member, except for its rotation, has no movement whatsoever with respect to the entire machine and so that the punching mechanism 58 in its oscillation within the machine also oscillates with respect to the mounting of the spiral member 2I3.

spirals 2I3 and 2H.

It is essential to so. regulate the rotation of I the shaft H3 and the corresponding oscillation of the punching plate I09 that any rotation thereof will correspond to the oscillatory movement of the entire punching mechanism 58; that is, that the punching plate I09 will descend through the web 53 during the forward motion of the punching mechanism 58 and so that the punching plate I09 will be free of the web 53 during the return of the punching mechanism.

It is thus found advantageous to cause the rotary motion of the shaft H3 and the corresponding oscillatory. motion of the plate I09 to be a function of the oscillatory movement of the entire punching mechanism. Thus as the punching mechanism 58 moves forward, the meshing of the small spiral gear 2" in the spiral 2I3 causes said spiral gear to rotate and thus causes a corresponding rotation of the shaft H3 and a corresponding oscillation of the punching plate I09.

If the path through which the entire punching mechanism 58 were to pass and if the corresponding path of the spiral gear 2I'I upon the spiral gear 23 were sufficiently long, then no motion of the spiral gear 2 I3 would be necessary to create a sufiicient rotation of the shaft H3 to effect the punching operation. The motion of the small spiral gear 2" along the spiral gear 2I3 alone would result in a sufficient rotation to release the spiral gear 2II from its .engagement with the spiral 2I3 in order to prevent any undesired rotation ofthe shaft H3 in the undesired opposite direction. l

However, it is found expedient to cause-the spiral gear 2I3 to rotate, said rotation .being preferably at least equal to or greater than the speed which would be induced in the small spiral gear 2I'I by the return motion of the punching mechanism 58 so that at all times the rotation of the shaft II3 would be in the same direction. Where the speed of rotation of the spiral gear 2I3 is equal to the speed that would be induced by the return motion of the .smallspiral 2", then during the return of the punching mechanism 58, the small spiral 2I'I will merely slide along the groove spiral gear 2I3 and the shaft H3 and the cam II5 will remain poised in the up position so that the punching plate will be free of the web 53 during the return. The rotation of the spiral gear 2I3 with respect to the small spiral gear 2II also produces another effect and that is that when the forward speed of the punching mechanism 58 and the corresponding forward speed of the worm gear 2I'I is combined with the additional speed of rotation given to the spiral gear, then the stroke of the cam H5 and the corresponding stroke of the punching plate I09 at the time when it enters and rises from the web. is much faster and much more forceful and rapid than would otherwise be the case were there no rotation of the spiral gear 2I3; and correspondingly, since the effective speed'of rotation of the spiral gear 2I'I during the return of the entire punching mechanism 58 is equal to the difference between the speed of the spiral gear 2I3 and the speed of the return of the punching mechanism 50, the stroke of the cam I I5 along the'upper portion of the arc is slower than the downstroke or cutting stroke. Thus, where, in the preferred form, the speed of rotation induced in the small spiral 2I'I by the return is equal to the speed induced by the rotation of spiral 2I3. Then during the return of the punching mechanism, the small spiral 2I'I will simply slide along the groove of the spiral 2I3, the shaft II3 will not rotate and the cam II5 will consequently be virtually stationary during the return so that the punching plate I09 will be poised in the up position during the return.

The punching plate I09 and the die I26 may readily be changed to provide for different sizes and shapes of perforation or cut-out. It should be noted however, that where the same size perforation or cut-out is desired, but where, however, a different space or distance between said perforations is required in order to form bags or articles of different sizes, the only manipulation that is necessary to effect a change in the operation ofthe machine to increase the said dis- ,tance is the manipulation or rotation of the head I of the bolt I85 (Figure 32) comes in connection with change gear size connected with change of ratio induced by difference in change gear 12. No other operation whatsoever is required for this purpose, except that, as hereinafter described, changes in the size of the change gear I2 will produce different speeds of move-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2511303 *Sep 9, 1946Jun 13, 1950Benj C Betner CompanyWindow bag and method and apparatus for making same
US2565367 *Nov 23, 1949Aug 21, 1951Polaroid CorpMethod for forming image-receiving film for use in photography
US2600284 *Mar 1, 1947Jun 10, 1952Boston Herald Traveler CorpApparatus for inserting supplementary sheets in newspapers and the like
US2624448 *Nov 19, 1946Jan 6, 1953Peterson Clarence JConveyer mechanism for box wrapping machines
US2662578 *Jul 7, 1949Dec 15, 1953Bemis Bro Bag CoManufacture of window bags
US2710045 *Feb 6, 1953Jun 7, 1955George W Swift Jr IncCorrugated paper web guiding and tensioning apparatus
US2895551 *Dec 20, 1952Jul 21, 1959Electrolux CorpApparatus for making container closures
US3104573 *Sep 28, 1959Sep 24, 1963Minnesota Mining & MfgReciprocable die mechanism including cooperating ejector means operative to halt the die movement
US3216298 *May 1, 1962Nov 9, 1965Warren S D CoPaper finishing machine
US3429235 *Oct 7, 1966Feb 25, 1969Julian B Slevin Co IncApparatus for forming and attaching full cell inserts to bottle carriers
US3468227 *Oct 25, 1966Sep 23, 1969En Mail Machine CorpEnvelope blank forming machine
US4017349 *Mar 28, 1975Apr 12, 1977Humboldt Products CorporationApparatus for manufacturing large disposable specialty drapes
US4549917 *Feb 1, 1983Oct 29, 1985Adolph Coors CompanyDie cut window laminating device
US4795513 *Oct 27, 1986Jan 3, 1989Adolph Coors CompanyMethod and apparatus for producing a laminated composite material having perforated inner layer
EP0117623A2 *Jan 25, 1984Sep 5, 1984Adolph Coors CompanyDie cut window laminating device
Classifications
U.S. Classification83/100, 83/167, 493/919, 83/315, 493/372, 83/165, 493/342, 83/112, 83/124, 156/514
International ClassificationB32B37/30, B32B37/00, B32B38/04, B31B19/82
Cooperative ClassificationY10S493/919, B32B37/0076, B31B19/82, B32B38/04, B31B2219/9038
European ClassificationB32B38/04, B31B19/82, B32B37/00D