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Publication numberUS2285412 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1942
Filing dateAug 17, 1939
Priority dateAug 17, 1939
Publication numberUS 2285412 A, US 2285412A, US-A-2285412, US2285412 A, US2285412A
InventorsCaldwell Clarence H
Original AssigneeCaldwell Clarence H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Atomizer type window cleaning appliance
US 2285412 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9, 1942. c. H. CALDWELL ATOMIZER TYPE WINDOW CLEANING APPLIANCE Filed Aug. 17, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet l June 9, 1942. c. H. CALDWELL 'ATOMIZ ER TYPE WINDOW CLEANING APPLIANCE Filed Aug. 17, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 JLP'EZ L 61 485,110: 5. CnLaws-LL.

June 9, 1942. c. H, CA LDW ELL 7 2,285,412

ATOMIZER TYPE WINDOW CLEANING APPLIANCE Filed Aug. 1v, 1939 s Sheets-Sheet 5 Clams-woe" b. cunwsun Patented June 9, 1942 ATOMIZER TYPE WINDOW] CLEANING APPLIANCE Clarence H. Caldwell, Oak Park, Ill. Application August 17, 1939, Serial No. 290,532

14 Claims.

The present invention relates to an atomizer type window cleaning appliance and will bedescribed as a device suitable for cleaning the outside of Windows by an operator inside the Windows, which device includes means for atomizing and spraying a cleaning liquid against the pane during the cleaning operation.

An object of the present invention is to provide a a device of simple construction which is easily operated and which includes a wiper element supporting a spraying apparatus, the element being outside workable and inside controllable by an operator, with respect to a window.

Another object of the present invention has to do with an outside workable inside operable window cleaner including means for spraying a cleaning liquid against a window surface during the cleaning operation, with washing and drying being carried out in a single operation.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a window wiper having convexly curved working surface, the wiper including two hingedly connected parts, each part including substantially half of the working surface, and the part being spring arched to convex relation. Each part has an upstanding portion adjacent its hinge for attachment of operating tape, the pull of the tape about the top and bottom rails of the window rocking the wiper the lead and tail ends of the working surf-ace parts on the hinge and forcing against the pane increasing the area of surface a contact and thereby enabling a wiping action along corners between the pane and horizontal members of the sash, i. e., a muntin or rail.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide an outside workable inside controllable window wiper with spray orifice means so disposed as to enable projection of spray into corners and along vertical members of the sash.

The invention has for an additional object the provision of unitary structure comprising a reservoir and atomizer, self-contained, applicable and removable as such to the wiper, so that the Wiper may be used with or without the spray feature.

Another and important object of the present invention is to provide a window wiper of the class described wherein the working surface is formed by thin metal, normally convexly curved with respect to the window surface is bendable, slightly, as pressure is applied to the working tapes to thereby increase the area of engagement between the working surface of the wiper and the window pane. The metal having characteristics of ability to resume its pane, which working original curved or convex shape after strain imposed by the tapes has been relieved.

The invention has for an additional object the provision of an outside workable inside operable window wiper, given to and fro movement by tapes suitably attached to it, which wiper carries means for spraying the outside of a window, and a hose carried by the tapes connected at one end to the spray and at the other or inner end having a bulb which may be squeezed by the operator to eject liquid from the spray container, against the outer surface of the window pane.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide an atomizer arrangement with means for controllingthe discharge of liquid from the atomizer to regulate the amount of liquid discharged and thereby create a fine spray.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of tape engaging catches on the wiper so that the tapes may be connected to the wiper in order to secure maximum efficiency of the wiper with respect to a window pane.

The invention has for an additional object the provision of fabric retaining means on the part constituting the wiping surface whereby a piece of fabric material may be temporarily held on the wiping surface, which attaching means constitute lugs struck out of the metal constituting the wiping surface.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide means for filling the reservoir of the atomizer unit without removing it from the wiper. V

The above, other and further objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and accompanying drawings.

The accompanying drawings illustrate various features of the invention, and the views thereof are as follows:

Figure 1 is a fragmental vertical sectional view through a portion of a window illustrating the present invention in place for cleaning the outside surface of one of the window sashes by an operator standing adjacent the insides of the window, and shows one portion of the pliant working surface of the wiper flattened against the window pane.

Figure 2 is an isometric view of the wiper of the present invention, showing the tapes attached thereto, illustrating the manner of spray discatch of one of the angle members of the wiper and the upper tape attached to the upper catch of the other of the angle members of the wiper,

and reversed from the arrangement shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a fragmental View of an actuating tape, showing a modified form of supporting the atomizer hose along a tape.

Figure 4 is an axial section through the unitary spray device showing it in place on the wiper of the present invention, with certain parts in elevation and certain parts in section.

Figure 5 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially in the plane indicated by the line V-V of Fig. 4.

Figure 6 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially in the plane indicatedby the line VI-VI of Fig. 4.

Figure '7 is a view, partially in transverse section, and partially in elevation, taken on the plane indicated by line VII-VII of Fig. 4.

Figure 8 is an end view of the wiper of the present invention, showing the parts constituting the working surface of the wiper flattened against the surface of a window pane. For purposes of clarity, the attaching tapes have been eliminated.

Figure 9 is a fragmental portion of an operating tape, showing the bulb end of the hose attached to the tape by a clip.

Figure 10 is a view, partially in section, taken along the line X--X of Fig. 4, and showing the manner of supplying the liquid container with liquid without removing the spray device from the wiper.

Figure 11 is a fragmental sectional view of one of the pipes of the spray atomizer, showing a restrictor in place in the bore of the pipe for reducing pressure of liquid forced through the pipe for regulating the flow of liquid to the atomizer orifice.

Figure 12 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially in the plane indicated by line XII XII of Fig. 11. 1

Figure 13 is a fragmental view of the working surface side of the wiper, showing the illustrated form of spring means for normally maintaining the parts constituting the working surface in convex relation, and showing a fragmental portion of the felt which is permanently attached to the working surface side of these members.

Figure 14 is an axial sectional view of a spray tip with a spiraled or threaded insert for producing whirling movement of the discharged liquid to produce a spray.

Figure 15 is an end view of the tip of Figure 14 looking at the left hand end of the same. The drawings will now be explained.

The wiper of the present invention, illustrated in Fig. 2, Fig. 5 and Fig. 8, as well as in Fig. 1, is shown as constructed of similar parts A and B hingedly connected.

The parts A and B are hingedly connected by means of a backbone, designated generally at C, and formed of stamped metal comprising a web I, and upstanding side walls 2 and 3. The backbone has end portions 4 with slots 5 extending downwardly from the upper ends thereof, for a purpose to be later explained. The upper ends of said end portions 4 are arcuately curved as at 6, as may be observed readily in Fig. 8.

The wiper part A comprisesa portion I, which forms part of the working surface of the wiper. Int-egrally formed and projecting upwardly therefrom, in angular relation, is an upstanding part 8 with its upper portion curved as at 9. Lugs H] are struck upwardly from the surface of the part A, adjacent the side margins, constituting means for receiving a hinge pin H.

The part B of the wiper includes a similar surface forming part l2, an upstanding angular portion 13, with upstanding lugs i l arranged to receive a hinge pin l5.

The upstanding parts 8 and I3 are herein sometimes referred to as handles of the wiper.

The parts I and 12 are formed of metal adapted to take a convex set as illustrated yet slightly yieldable when pulling pressure is applied to the handle by means of the tapes, to flatten the parts 1 and I2 against a window pane thereby increasing the surface engagement between the wiper and the window pane. The parts and ii. are formed with depending flanges l6 and 11, respectively, and in the space so formed a felt pad is is secured by paste, glue or other suitable means. The felt constitutes a backing member for a wiping fabric'or cloth l9 which is removably attached to the wiper.

Struck out from the upper surfaces of the parts I and 12, are fingers 2i! and 2 I respectively, with their free ends bowed toward the surface of the parts 1 and I2, and constituting spring fingers under which the margins of the fabric l9 may be held to secure the fabric in place on the wiper. As illustrated in Fig. 5, the felt or fabric l9 may be of hemless material, suitably folded and may be attached to the wiper without piling against a surface or along an edge thereby afiording a smooth even fabric surface for contact with a window pane.

The members A and B are hingedly connected to the backbone C by the hinge pins H and I5 passing through suitable apertures in the lugs l0 and Hi, respectively, and through registering apertures in the end portions 4 of the backbone structure. The pins H and 15 are shown as long bolts, having heads 22 at one end, and nuts 22a. at the opposite ends, the heads being slotted to receive a screw driver blade.

Flat springs 23 and 23a are attached to the web i of the backbone structure C, as clearly illustrated in Fig. 13, by means of rivets 24 with the ends of the springs bearing against the surfaces of the parts A and B, with spring action, to normally maintain the portions 1 and I2 of said parts, in the curved or convex form illustrated in Fig. 5 and Fig. 2.

The curved portions 9 and 9a of the angular or handle parts 8 and 14 respectively of the parts A and B, terminate in inturned flanges 25 and. 26 respebtively which form abutting surfaces, when the curved ends of the handle portions are in contact, as may be observed in Figure 6 which contact is the normal position of the parts, when the wiper is not in use.

The angular or handle part 8 of the member A, adjacent the curved portion 9 thereof, is formed with an elongated outstanding hook 21, while the angular or handle part l3 of the part B is formed with a similar hook 28.

The angular or handle part 8 of the part A, is, along the margin of its curved portion 9 formed with two notches 29 and 30, while the part I3 of the part B is formed with similar notches 3| and 32, with the notches 3| and 29 in register and the notches 3i and 32 in register, as may be observed in Figure 2.

The hooks 21 and 28 and the notches constitute means for securing the ends of tape portions D and E to the handle of the wiper for working it back and forth along the outer surface of a window pane.

The tape portions D and E may constitute the extremities of a continuous tape member or, if desired may constitute two single tapes.

The handle engaging end of the tape D is provided with a looped wire 33 while the attaching end of the tape E is provided with a similar loop 34. The loops 33 and 34 may be engaged with the hooks 2'! and 28 or with the notches 29 and 36 of the handle part 8 of the member A or the notches 3| and 32 of the handle part l3 of the part B of the wiper.

In Fig. the tape D is shown as connected with its loop 33 in the loop the notches 29 and 38 while 34 of the tape E is connected to the hook 28. This form of connection, as will be observed, enables application of the attaching ends of the tape different distances from the working surface of the wiper, or at the same distance, if desired. This attachment of the tape being determined by the operator.

This staggered attachment of the tape ends to the handle portion of the wiper, has been found in practice to efiect a better operation of the wiper as it offsets the unequal tension on the tape created by various factors in relation to the upper and lower rails of a sash while the tape is being pulled by the operator. Among such factors may be mentioned 1) angles of the tape ends and (2) unequal resistance to tape movement by reason of its contact with the upper and lower sash rails.

For reinforcing the attachment of the springs 23 to the web I of the backbone structure C, reinforcements 35 may be applied against the inner surface of the backbone, as illustrated in Figure 5, and Figure 4, to receive the rivets 24.

The upstanding walls 2 and 3, of the backbone structure C, terminate respectively in curved portions 36 and 37 for a purpose to be later explained.

The spray structure, designated generally as F includes a cylinder 38 constituting a chamber for a charge of cleaning liquid. The ends of the cylinder are normally closed by caps 39 and 40. A block 4| is suitably secured to the cylinder 38, as by welding or the like, against the lower portion of the cylinder body as illustrated in Fig. 4, which block is provided with a horizontal bore 42 partways through the block, communicating with a bore 43 into the interior of the cylinder whereby the cylinder may be filled, as later explained.

In the illustrated form of spray structure, a channel piece 44 is attached to the exterior of the cylinder 38, in spaced relation to the block 4|, for receiving between its flanges a block 45 supporting a pipe 46 which, when assembled, is parallel to the cylindrical chamber 38 and disposed below it, as illustrated. The block 45 has a horizontal bore 41 extending into it from one side margin which communicates with the interior of the pipe 46 by means of a hole 48 in the pipe.

Attached to the exterior of the cap 46 is a block 49 which, in elevation, is somewhat triangular in shape. This block is bored upwardly as at 58, partway of the height of the block, and laterally at 5| to receive the threaded end of a pipe 52 which passes through a suitably disposed aperture 53 in the cap. Certain of the edge margins of the block 49 are bored inwardly providing ducts 54 and 55 which afford communication between the bore 50 and the opposite edge margins of the block.

Threaded into the lower portion of the bore 50 is one end of an angular tube 56, the other end of which is adapted to enter an end of the cap 40 is rotatable on the pipe 52 so that the cap may be threaded onto and 01f of the adjacent threaded end of the cylinder 38. The inner end of the pipe 52 is threaded and carries a head 51 which is counterbored at 58 with a cross bore 59 opening at opposite points of the periphery of the head.

Inserted in the duct 54 is a spray tip 13 having its inner end open and its outer end closed except for a small discharge orifice 14. Within the tip 13 is a member 15 having a spiraled or threaded surface to set up a whirling motion of the liquid discharged through the orifice 14 to thereby create a suitable spray effect. The inner end of the member 15 is oblate as shown at 16 in Figure 15 to admit liquid to the space between the member 75 and the surrounding surface of the tip.

Inserted in the duct is a similar tip 13.

The cross bore 59 of the head 51 admits liquid from the interior of the cylinder 38 through the pipe 52 and into the bore 56 of the member 49, to be therein mixed with air and ejected through the spray tips 13 in the ducts 54 and 55 as a spray discharge, which mixture has been atomized by the commingling of the air and liquid in the bore 50, and the whirling motion created by the screw members 75.

The end cap 39 is equipped with a similar structure so that at both ends of the cylinder 38, provision is made for spraying atomized liquid against a window pane.

Fig. 2 illustrates the manner in which the spraying is discharged from the spray tips 13.

Within each of the caps 39 and 40, is a washer 66 adapted to seal the ends of the cylinder and the cap in leaktight relation.

In order to control the amount of liquid blown through the pipe 52 a restrictor is inserted in each pipe. Figs. 11 and 12 illustrate one form of restrictor as comprising a cylindrical member or wire 6| flattened along one portion of its surface to provide a passageway for liquid of limited cross-sectional area.

This wire 6! could of course be supplanted by one of diiferent cross-sectional contour, such for example as square contour, hexagonal contour, or other suitable shape.

The spray device just described is formed as a unitary structure and is applicable to the wiper member as such, and also is removable from the wiper member as such.

The spray device just described, is applied to the Wiper as follows:

The parts A and B are swung about their hinges to separate the flanges 25 and 26 of the upper end portions of the handle members 8 and 43, a sufiicient distance to enable insertio of the cylinder 38 therebetween. When installed, the angle pipes 56 engage the slots 5 in the end portions 4 of the backbone structure C and the cylinder 38 enters between the curved upper ends 36 and3l of the side walls 2 and 3 respectively of the backbone structure, as illustrated in Fig. 5'. In this manner the spray device is held in operative relation with respect to the wiper.

After the spray device has been inserted as described, the upper ends of the handle portions 8 and I 3 come in contact, as shown in Figure 6 In order to create ejector action in the parts 49, air is introduced into the pipe 46 by means of 4- a hose 62' having a nozzle 33 enterable in the bore 4-! of the block 45. The nozzle 63 is provided with a knurled portion 64 to expedite application andremoval of the nozzle, as may readily be seen in Fig. 6.

- The hose 62 is carried by a tape.

Fig. 2 shows the hose 62 lying along one of the tapes, there illustrated as tape E, passing through a hole 65 in the tape adjacent its hook loop 34. The other end of the hose 32 is equipped with a bulb 66 which may be squeezed by the operator to create air pressure in the pipe 46 and thus set up atomizing action in the members 49 for spray discharge against a window pane.

' The bulb end of the hose is illustrated as supported in position on the tape by means of a clip 6% which embraces the tape and which is provided with jaws 62a adapted to exert spring action on the hose adjacent the bulb.

Fig. 3 illustrates another form of supporting the hose along a tape in which the tape has sewed to it, on its outer face, a strip 6'! of fabric forming a pocket between it and the tape in which pocket the hose 62 may be inserted.

The side ture, as well as the handle members 8 and [3 are provided with apertures in register with the bore 41 in the block 45 to enable application of the nozzle 63 to the block, and also in register with the bore 42 in the block 4| whereby the cylinder may be filled with cleaning fluid.

The spray device is suported in the backbone structure so that as the handle parts 8 and I3 move with hinging action between closed position of Figure 6 and open position of cylinder 38 will be held in place.

For filling the cylinder 38, a cap fit a container 18 is used.

In order to assure use of proper cleaning fluid in the spray device, the cap fl is made especially to fit the container 18 so that improper cleaning fluids cannot be supplied to the cylinder by means of" the cap ll.

The cap is provided with a neck 13 carrying a nozzle H adapted to enter the bore 42 of the block 4 I, through registering apertures in the side walls of the backbone structure and the adjacent handle member, in the manner illustrated in Fi ure 10. The neck H! has a lateral connection 12 into which the nozzle 63 of the hose 62 may be inserted for creating siphon action in the neck 10 as air pressure is exerted through the nozzle H into the cylinder 38 to deliver the liquid from the container 18 into the cylinder 38 to fill it.

After the cylinder 38 has been filled, the cap 11 and the container 18 are removed, a suitable plug is inserted in the bore 42 as a stopper and the nozzle 63 is inserted within the bore 41 as shown in Figure 6. Air pressure exerted through the nozzle 63 by manipulation of the bulb 66 then forces the liquid in the cylinder 38 through the discharge nozzles T3.

The manner of application and use of the present invention may be described with reference to Figure 1.

Figure 1 illustrates in section a window frame G having an upper sash H and a lower sash K.

The lower sash K is to be cleaned.

The lower sash is raised sufhciently so that the tape portion D may be inserted over the top rail of the lower sash K to hang against the outer surface of the window, and adjacent the bottom rail. The loop hook 33 of the tape portion D is then engaged over the hook 2'! and the hook 34 of the tape portion E is engaged over the hook or in 'l'l adapted to walls 2 and 3 of the backbone struc- Figure 8, the

Cir

the notches 3| and; 32 of the wiper part B. The nozzle 63 is then inserted in the bore 41 of the block 45 and the bulb end of the hose engaged with the jaws 62a of the clip 62b. The tape over the upper sash rail is pulled until the wiper is within spraying range of the top of the pane. The tapes are then tightened, and the bulb B6 squeezed whereupon the liquid is ejected against the window pane and then by pulling alternately on the tapes, the wiper is given up and down movement against the outer surface of the window to clean it. This is continued until the pane is clean.

In using the tapes for working the wiper back and forth to rub and clean the window surface as described, tension is applied to both tapes to flatten the portions or parts 1 and I2 of the wiper element against the surface of the window pane to increase surface contact.

The utilization of a curved or convex working face for the wiper prevents the ends of the fabric 53 from absorbing all the moisture and dirt thereby eliminating streaking of the window pane. Furthermore, by making the working surface of convex formation maximum surface of the fabric engagement is achieved and the dirt is spread evenly over the area of the fabric in engagement with the pane. Another advantage in making the working surface of convex formation is that it more readily pulls over muntins or cross rails of panel windows. Furthermore, the hinge construction of the wiper prevents lifting of any part of the working surface away from the window pane, as long as there is tension on the tapes, the tape tension insuring sufficient surface engagement between the wiper and pane to efficient- 1y clean the pane.

By so disposing the spray discharge members 49 near the sides of the wiper, makes it possible to discharge the cleaning fluid into corners between the pane and the vertical members of the window frame thereby assuring cleaning of these corners in a satisfactory manner.

The operator uses only as much liquid as may be necessary under the particular circumstances, squeezing the bulb 63 to discharge the liquid. Whenever the bulb is at rest, there is of course no liquid discharged. The orifices of the cross bores 59 of the heads 51 are small so that but little liquid will enter the pipes 52. Furthermore, by reason of the use of the restrictor 6|, in the pipes, liquid flow by gravity is prevented.

The amount of flow ejected through the spray tips 13 depends on the amount of restriction offered to flow by the restriotors 61 which of course can be made to afford any amount of liquid discharge for cleaning purposes.

The liquid is discharged, as shown in Fig. 2,

clearof the leading and tail ends of the surface portion of the wiper to assure discharge of the liquid against the window pane thus facilitating the cleaning operation.

It will be observed that a device of the present invention enables cleaning and polishing of a window pane, in one operation as it is unnecessary to use first a damp cloth and then a dry cloth. This reduces wear on the tapes and also reduces the number of cleaning cloths or fabrics required over a given period of time.

The atomizer wiper of the present invention overcomes the difiiculty of removing small spots caused by quick drying of the cleaning fluid on windy, dry or hot days. It will be noted that there is practically no time intervalfor drying between applications of the spray to the pane eliminate it.

It is to be understood that the spray device may be removed from the wiper and the wiper used as such, in the manner described.

An advantage of providing a window wiper with a convex working surface formed of slightly pliant or yieldable metal enables substantial flattening of the working surface against the window pane thus spreading the dirt over a greater area of the fabric on the wiper than is possible if the wiping surface is perfectly flat. This is because when using a perfectly fiat working surface the tapes have a tendency of raising one end from the window pane thus limiting the effective cleaning area to substantially that of one end of the flat work surface of the wiper.

It is to be noted that by changing the engagement of the tape hooks 33 and 34 on the handle of the wiper, different lever arm effects may be achieved.

The utilization of the spring clips 20 and 21 for securing the fabric in place on the wiper is expeditious, does not require wiper cloths of special formation, and makes the ready application and removal of such cloths a matter of but a moment.

' Referring again to Figure 1, after the lower sash K has been cleaned in the manner described, the upper sash I-I'may be lowered, the lower sash raised, and the upper sash cleaned in the same manner by applying thewiper element to the outside of the pane in the upper sash.

If desired the handle portions 8 and i3 may be provided with cooperating latching means such as the detents 69 and lapping spring fingers 68 to hold the abutting edges 25 and 25 in contact. Pull of the tapes in service will separate the latching means. When the pull is relieved, these automatically assume latched relation, being urged thereto by the springs 23 and 23a. The purpose of the fingers 68 and detents 59 at the top of the handle is to enable the use of lightly tensioned fiat springs which allow greater flexibility of hinging action of the parts of the wiper. The fingers 68 and detents 69 constitute a temporary lock or clasp to prevent opening of the handle parts, which might otherwise occur with the lightly tensioned springs, to thereby main tain the convexity of the work surface of the wiper which prevents the ends of the wiper from absorbing all the moisture and dirt.

The invention has been described herein more or less precisely as to details, yet it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited thereby, as changes may be made in the arrangement and proportion of parts, and equivalents may be substituted, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

The invention is claimed as follows:

1. A window cleaning device comprising a wiper member, tape means connected to said member and adapted to extend around a window sash whereby the member may be moved over the window pane on the opposite side thereof from the operator, a cleaning liquid reservoir carried by said wiper member, and means carried by said tape means and movable therewith and controllable by the operator from inside the window for discharging liquid from said reservoir onto the window pane.

2. A window cleaning device comprising a wiper member consisting of two hingedly connected parts, said parts having working surface portions'which together form a wiping member surface, a fabric removably secured against said arranged for engagement with a window pane and operable at will by the operator for ejecting liquid from said reservoir for ejecting liquids ahead of the wiping surface as the wiper member is moved by said actuating element.

3. A cleaning device comprising a backbone structure and two members hingedly connected to said structure, each member having a surface portion which together constitute a wiping surface of convex form, a fabric removably secured against said surface, said members having angularly arranged parts which together cooperate to provide a handle and to enclose said backbone structure, a liquid reservoir supported by said backbone structure, the construction being such as to allow hinging action of said members as said device is moved over a surface for cleaning it without displacement of the reservoir, means connected to said angularly arranged parts for moving the device over the outside surface'of a window pane by an operator inside the window,

and remotely operable means for causing discharge of liquid from said reservoir as said device is moved over said pane.

4. In a movable window cleaning device operable from the side of the window opposite to the sideto be cleaned and having discharge means for spraying said window, a cylindrical tube, re-

movable end closures for said tube, means for supplying liquid to the interior of said tube, discharge orifices adjacent each end of said tube, a pipe extending from each end of the interior of said tube through an end closure and carrying said discharge orifices, a pipe exteriorly of said tube for supplying air to said orifices, means for supplying air to said last pipe, and means remotely operable for actuating said tube over the window surface to be cleaned.

5. A window wiper of theclass described, comprising two hingedlyconnected members each having a part constituting a working surface, said members having angularly arranged parts carrying hook means disposed at, different distances from said surface parts, and a flexible connector having means for connection to certain of said hook means for moving said wiper over a window pane, said plurality of hooking means comprising means for connecting the flexible element to said wiper elements to achieve different lever arm effects.

6. In a window wiper of the class described, in combination, a backbone structure, two members hingedly connected to said structure and each having a part constituting aworking surface part, spring means connected to said backbone structure and acting against saidsurface parts of said members for normally maintaining'the same in substantially'convex relation, said members having upstanding parts adjacent the hinge thereof carrying hook members. an onerating tape Connected to said hook members to move said wiper over a window pane, said tape when operated for moving said wiper over a window pane causing hinging action of said members to increase the surface engagement between said member parts and the window pane.

'7. A window cleaner of the class described comprising a wiper element remotely operable for cleaning a window surface, and liquid spray means carried by said wiper element for ejecting liquid against the window surface to be cleaned, said spray means including a liquid receptacle having a closure member, a pipe extending through said closure member and having a head at its inner end adapted to be submerged in the liquid in the receptacle, said head having an opening in fiow communication with the pipe, a nozzle member supported on the outer end of said pipe and having a counterbore in it at right angles to said pipe and having a discharge duct leading from said counterbore through the nozzle member surface providing a discharge orifice, an air inlet tube entered in the open end of the counterbore, and means connected to said tube for creating an air stream through the counterbore and duct and past the pipe to discharge liquid through said orifice.

8. A window cleaner of the class described comprising a wiper element remotely operable for clamping a window surface, and liquid spray means carried by said wiper element for ejecting liquid against the window surface to be cleaned, said spray means including a liquid receptacle having a closure member, a pipe extending through said closure member and having a head at its inner end adapted to be submerged in the liquid in the receptacle, said head having an opening in fiow communication with the pipe, a nozzle member supported on the outer end of said pipe and having a counterbore in it at right angles to said pipe and having a discharge duct leading from said counterbore through the nozzle member, aspray tip within said duct having a discharge orifice, means within said tip for imparting whirling motion to the liquid as it leaves the orifice, an air inlet tube entered in the open end of the counterbore, and means connected to said tube for creating an air stream through the counterbore and duct and past the pipe to discharge liquid through said orifice, and means within said pipe for materially restricting the flow of liquid through said pipe to thereby control the amount of liquid discharged through said orifice.

9. A window cleaner of the class described comprising a wiper element remotely operable for cleaning a window surface, and liquid spray means carried by said wiper element for ejecting liquid against the window surface to be cleaned, said spray means including a tube having removable end closures to form a liquid receptacle, short pipes extending through said closures, nozzle members supported on the outer ends of said pipes, heads on the inner ends of said pipes having liquid inlet ports perpendicular to the pipes, said nozzle members having liquid passages therein opening through the said members and in flow communication with said pipes, an air supply pipe supported along said tube, means entered in said liquid passages of said nozzle members and removably enterable in the ends of said air pipe to establish air flow relation between said air pipe and nozzle members,

and means for supplying air to said air supply ipe, the construction being such that the end closures and nozzle members may be removed from the tube and applied thereto without disturbing any of the parts. 9 v

10. In a window cleaning device having a spray head, said spray head comprising a member having a mixing chamber, liquid and air inlet means in said chamber arranged in angular relation to each other, said head having an outlet duct from said chamber, a spray tip in said duct, said tip having an end provided with a discharge orifice, and a member within said tip having its surface threaded to impart whirling motion to the air and liquid mixture discharged through said orifice.

11. In a window cleaning device having a spray head, said spray head comprising a member having a mixing chamber, liquid and air inlet means in said chamber arranged in angular relation to each other, said head having an outlet duct from said chamber, a spray tip in said duct, said tip having an end provided with a discharge orifice, and a member within said tip having its surface threaded to impart whirling motion to the air and liquid mixture discharged thrcugh said orifice, the inner end of said memberbeing reduced in size to admit the air and liquid mixture to the space surrounding said member.

12. In a window cleaning device, a wiper member adapted to be positioned on the outside of a window, a flexible member carrying said wiper adapted to be looped around said window and operable for moving the wiper over a face of the window from the opposite side thereof, a backbone structure on said wiper member, two members hingedly connected to said backbone structure and each having a working surface, spring means connected to said backbone structure and acting against said working surfaces for normally maintaining them in substantially convex relation, upstanding portions on each of said hinged members positioned adjacent the hinge in opposed relation, means on each of said hinged members for connecting each end of said flexible member at the same or at a different distance from said working surfaces, a reservoir carried by said wiper member between said. hinged members, spray means on said reservoir, and means controllable remotely from said reservoir for ejecting liquids contained in said reservoir during operation of said wiper.

13. A window cleaning device comprising a wiper member adapted to be moved in opposite directions over the surface of a window, a liquid reservoir connected to said wiper member, and discharge means spaced outwardly from said wiper member and facing in directions for spraying jets of liquid from said reservoir ahead of said wiper member asit is moved in said opposite directions.

14. A window cleaning device comprising a wiper member adapted to be moved in two opposite directions over the surface of a window, a liquid reservoir carried by said Wiper member, discharge orifices at the ends of said reservoir, and means for maintaining said discharge orifices spaced outwardly from said wiper member and from. the window surface to be cleaned whereby liquid from said' discharge orifices is sprayed in both directions of movement ahead of the wiper member.

CLARENCE H; CALDWELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2716770 *May 27, 1950Sep 6, 1955Caldwel Clarence HWindow cleaning appliance
US2764771 *Dec 19, 1955Oct 2, 1956Philip A MarcheseBath appliance
US2859463 *Feb 13, 1956Nov 11, 1958Joseph HirschWindow cleaning implement
US2876480 *May 17, 1954Mar 10, 1959Angelo ViolaWindow cleaning device
US4254527 *Feb 21, 1979Mar 10, 1981Pfeifer Peter HWindow cleaning implement
US4759658 *Dec 1, 1986Jul 26, 1988Manor Jonathan WConcrete finishing broom
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/250.3, 15/220.1, 15/222, 15/103, 15/250.11, 118/103
International ClassificationA47L1/13, A47L1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L1/13
European ClassificationA47L1/13