Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2285535 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1942
Filing dateMar 4, 1941
Priority dateMar 4, 1941
Publication numberUS 2285535 A, US 2285535A, US-A-2285535, US2285535 A, US2285535A
InventorsOtto Schlett
Original AssigneeOtto Schlett
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fireplace display
US 2285535 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9, 1942. Q SCHLETT 2,285,535

. .FIREPLACE DISPLAY Filed March 4, 1941 f( gg 11 1413 19(10451 20 INV EN TOR. 0mm/zdf BYx Patented June 9, 1942 STATS FIREPLACE DISPLAY om) schien, Bronx, Nfv.

Application March 4, 1941, Serial No. 381,628V

11 Claims.

This invention relates to display devices in general, and particularly to fireplace displays, intended to create the impression of live re emanating from imitation fuel, such as artificial wood logs, coal, etc.

One'of the objects of the present invention is to provide an extremely simple and inexpensive device of this kind, wherein easily constructed light-controlling means are employed, which are designed to direct light rays against a steeply inclined, translucent screen upon which the images of long, ever-changing, colored flame, sparks, smoke or clouds are impressed, and wherein such images of varicolored flames are caused to produce the effect of moving from without towards the center and also in upward direction, to create a realistic imitation of actual fire, with smoke and occasionally sparks, drawing up the chimney.

Another object of this invention is to provide in my device light intensity control means, whereby direct light, as well as major portions of reflected light, and images created thereby, are caused to become alternately and gradually visible and obscured, while the images projected upon a screen continuously change in colors.

Another object of the present invention is to provide in connection with a light source employed in my device, regulating means for controlling the speed of the mechanism actuating the light controlling devices.

The foregoing and still further objects and important advantages of the present invention will become more fully apparent from the ensuing description and the .accompanying drawing, which latter, although showing a specific construction of my invention, is by no means intended to restrict the same to the actual disclosure, and wherein:

Fig. 1 is a front elevation of my device;

Fig. 2 is a vertical cross sectional view through the device shown in Fig. 1, including imitation wood logs placed in front thereof;

Fig. 3 is a horizontal cross section through my device taken on line l3 3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a top View of the light source and motive arrangement of my device;

Fig. 5 is a side elevation thereof partially in section; and A Fig. 6 is a top view of my device in its collapsed position, ready for shipment.

Referring now specifically to the figures, numeral IU denotes the back wall of my device, from which extend upwardly-broadening side walls I I. The latter are joined with the back wall by a top glass or a lm material, such as a sheet of Cellu- A loid, which screen is sharply inclined for reasons hereinafter explained. Below the screen is provided an opening, and in this opening is secured to back member I0 a hinged platform I3, which may be pivoted about point I1 so that the front portion of the platform can be swung down, as indicated in broken lines in Fig. 2. Supporting the movable platform portion is an upright I8, which is hinged at I9 and may be collapsed lto a flat, downward position, indicated in broken lines in Fig. 1. Movably secured to the'inclined edges of side walls II are two adjustable wings 20, which latter, when the device is to be shipped, may be swung towards screen I5, as indicated in Fig. 6, so that the latter will not be damaged.

In front of the opening, and extending somewhat above the lower edge of panel I5, an arrangement of actual fuel or of a fuel imitation is placed, such as imitation wood logs 2l indicated in Fig. 2. Supported by hinged platform I6 are sockets 22 for the reception of electric bulbs 23, which are surrounded by xed, nontransparent cylinders 24. The latter are preferably secured to platform I6, as shown at 25, and are provided with bottom vent openings 26. The passage ofair through these vent openings may be regulated by a sliding sleeve 21, provided with a handle 28 for facilitating its operation. When the sleeve is lowered over openings 26 the draft created by the heat of bulb 23 may be cut down. When the sleeve clears openings 26, the f ull amount of air is allowed to pass up cylinder 24. It will be observed that bulbs 23 and their cylinders extend partially outwards from the compartment below screen I5.

Above each cylinder is mounted' a fan 29, which is preferably supported by a fixed bracket 30, secured at 3| to rear wall I0 of the device. The free end of the bracket is bent upwards and terminates into a sharply pointed prong 32, upon which rests the conically shaped center 33 of fan 29. Extending from and secured to this raised fan center is a thin wire rod 34, which is guided at its upper portion in an eye of bracket 35 (see Fig. 2), sov that both the fan and rod 34 may freely rotate, when heated air emanating from cylinder 24 causes the fan to operate.

Attached to and slightly extending from wire rod 34, which latter is preferably very light and resilient, is a number of spaced, brightly polished spangles 36, which are inclined somewhat towards bulbs 23, so that they alternately reflect light from the latter onto screen I as their position changes. These spangles are preferably supported by small coils of spring wire members 31, which frictionally engage rod 34, and are adjustable in respect thereto, so that the spangles may be moved to various heights upon rod 34.

Secured above bulbs 23 to rear wall I0 of the device is a mirror 38 (see Fig. 2). Above the mirror are placed two superimposed, inclined sheets or panels, indicated at 39 and 40, see Figs. 2 and 3. Upon the lower panel 39, which may be made of glass or any other suitable transparent material, such as a cellulose ilm, there are provided zigzag or criss-cross formations of translucent, narrow strips 4I of differently colored material, preferably including green, yellow, red, blue and orange colors. With panel 40 there are arranged opaque tongue-shaped configurations 42, between which are provided similar, lightpassing tongues 43. Panel 40 may be made either from transparent material, with opaque tongues 42 painted or otherwise applied thereto, or may be fabricated in the form of a stamping from solid material, such as sheet metal, with tongues 42 stamped out from t'he metal.

It will be observed that tongues 42 as well as strips 4I are so positioned that their configurations are directed from the ends of panels 39 and 4I) towards their centers, providing a substantially herring-bone resembling design. This arrangement is made for the purpose of providing an illusion of flames moving from Without towards the center of the display. Attention is called to the substantially midway position of rods 34, extending from the fans, in respect to screen I5 and panels 39 and 40.

Referring to Figs. 4 and 5, it will be observed that on top of fan 29 there is placed a thin and lightweight curved body 44, which is intended to alternately prevent and permit the passage of light; through the fan, as the latter and body 44 rotate above bulb 23. This curved body may be either a separate stamping, secured to the fan, or it may form a part of the fan body itself. Such construction being obvious, a special illustration thereof is omitted.

Operation It will be observed from Figs. 1 and 3 that curved'shapes 44 mounted on top of fans 29 are disposed in opposite positions to one another, and that also the fans are arranged to rotate in opposite directions.

As the air within dark cylinders 24 becomes heated, a draft is created through passages 25 of the cylinders in upward direction. Heated air escaping from the top ofthe cylinders causes fans 29, segments 44 and rods 34 to rotate towards one another. A substantial portion of the light escaping through the openings between the fan blades will strike imitation fuel arrangement 2 I, placed in front of the device. Another major portion of the light passing through the fans will be reflected by mirror 38, through panels 39 and 4t, against screen I5. The reflected light is forced to first pass through translucent colored strips 4I and then through open fields 43 of upper panel 45. The resulting light images appearing upon screen I5 will resemble animated flametongue formations. Since screen I5 is sharply inclined in respect to mirror 38, these flametongue images appear relatively long and will diminish in light intensity towards their top ends.

This, together with the fluctuating light intensities caused by rotating segments 44, provides an impression of the flame-tongues dissolving into smoke or clouds. The colored strips 4I of lower panel 39 vary the coloring of the tongues, and in addition there will appear on the screen at various heights and at various frequencies tiny spark-resembling flashes, produced by minor light portions released through the fan openings being reflected by moving spangles 36. Thus a very realistic illusion of live flames, moving inwards and upwards, and of smoke and sparks, will appear upon screen I5.

Obviously I prefer to employ two spaced light sources to produce the desired light effects upon the screen. However, very satisfactory flame imitations may be elfected with but one light source, if the latter is placed below the screen center, in which event a somewhat differently shaped segment for controlling the light intensities of the images is employed.

It will be observed that the mechanism of the device is extremely simple, and although being so simple, will create a very effective illusion of flames, smoke and sparks emanating from the imitation fuel placed in front of the device. While I have shown and described specific forms and structures employed in my device, it is quite obvious that changes and improvements may be incorporated therein, without departing from the broad scope of my invention, as expressed in the annexed claims.

I claim:

1. In a fireplace display device, the combination with a translucent screen, of a light source, a light reector adapted to projectmajor light portions from the light source upon the screen, a plurality of superimposed panels interposed between the reflector and the screen, one of the panels having opaque and light-passing elds, another panel having an arrangement of colored fields, a movable member interposed between the light source and the reilector and provided with means for alternately obscuring major light portions from and passing them against the reflector, and other means carried by said movable member for alternately reflecting minor light portions against the screen at different heights.

2. In a fireplace display device, as set forth in claim l, said light source being surrounded by an opaque, Xed hollow member having air inlet passages at its bottom, and means adjustable relative to said hollowmember for controlling the amount of air passing through the passages.

3. In a iireplace display device, a substantially closed, vented hollow structure having an open space at its lower end, a collapsible light source support secured to said structure in its open space, at least two light sources mounted upon said support, a hollow, opaque member surrounding each light source and being open at the top and having air passages at the bottom, means for controlling the amount of air passing through said passages, a translucent screen mounted in said structure above the light sources and being sharply inclined in respect to the latter, a reflector disposed above the light sources and facing the screen, a plurality of superimposed, spaced panels interposed between the reflector and the screen, one of the panels having opaque and light-passing fields, another panel supporting an arrangement of narrow, colored translucent elds, the elds of both panels being inclined from the panel ends towards their centers, a fan operatively mounted above the light source and adapted to be actuated by heated air issuing from the top of said hollow member, a journaled rod associated with and extending above the fan and supporting a plurality of small light reflectors, and a light-passage controlling means provided with said fan.

4. In a replace display device, as set forth in claim 3, and movably mounted extension wings associated with said structure and adapted to be swung into adjacent position in respect to said screen.

5. In a fireplace display device, as set forth in claim 3, said light sources being disposed below and substantially midway in respect to the screen and said panels.

G. In a device of the class indicated, the combination with a light source, of a translucent screen sharply inclined in one direction in respect to the latter, a major light reflector, an images-producing panel interposed between the reiiector and the screen, said panel being inclined in an opposite direction to that of the screen in respect to the light source, a rotary member above the light source, light intensity controlling means and miniature light reflecting elements operative with said rotary member.

'7. In a device of the class indicated, the combination with at least two spaced light sources, of a translucent screen disposed above and being sharply inclined in one direction in respect to the light sources, a major light reiiector opposite said screen, a plurality of spaced, superimposed panels interposed between said reflector and the screen and being inclined opposite thereto in respect to the light sources, a light-passing rotary member above each light source, provided with light intensity controlling means and a yplurality of inclined, spaced miniature light reflectors, said panels having images-forming elements, adapted to produce upon the screen, due to the inclined position of the latter, elongated flame images, said rotary members and said light intensity controlling means being adapted to cause such images to move not only in upward direction, but also in the directions from the sides of the screen towards its center, and said miniature reiiectors being adapted to produce upon the screen spark-resembling images.

8. In a device of the class described, as set forth in claim 7, the rotary members above the two light sources being constructed and arranged to rotate towards each other, and said light intensity controlling means being arranged at positions opposite to each other, said rotary members and said intensity controlling means, through their rotary movements towards one another, causing the stated movements of the ame images upon the screen.

9. In a display device, at least one light source, at least one translucent screen for the reception of light rays from the light source, means for directing a major portion of light rays against the screen, means interposed between the light ray directing means and the screen for producing images upon the latter, movable means interposed between the light source and the light ray directing means for controlling the intensity of light rays released against the screen, means operative with said movable means for directing minor light reiiections upon the screen, and means for controlling the speed at which said movable means operate.

l0. In a display device, as per claim 9, said screen being sharply inclined towards the light source in one direction, said images producing means being inclined in opposite directon thereto.

ll. In a display device, as per claim 9, said screen being sharply inclined towards the light source in one direction, said images producing means being inclined in opposite direction thereto, and consisting of co-operatve opaque, lightpassing as Well as colored instrumentalities.

OTTO SCHLE'I'I.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3164053 *May 2, 1961Jan 5, 1965Orvil F ShallenbergerApparatus for displaying colored light
US3307443 *Dec 3, 1964Mar 7, 1967Orvil F ShallenbergerApparatus for displaying colored light
US3321859 *Feb 3, 1964May 30, 1967Frost & Company Ltd HElectrical illumination devices
US3395475 *Mar 7, 1967Aug 6, 1968Frost & Company Ltd HElectrical illumination devices
US4726351 *Aug 13, 1987Feb 23, 1988Baxi Partnership LimitedGas-fired appliances with "coal effect"
US5989128 *Jan 8, 1998Nov 23, 1999Universal Studios, Inc.Flame simulation
US6047489 *Feb 18, 1997Apr 11, 2000Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly and components therefor
US6363636 *Nov 19, 1999Apr 2, 2002Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly and components therefor
US6385881Feb 18, 2000May 14, 2002Dimplex North America LimitedSynchronized flicker device
US6393207Jan 11, 2000May 21, 2002Cfm Majestic Inc.Electric fireplace with light randomizer, filter and diffuser screen
US6564485Aug 29, 2000May 20, 2003Dimplex North America LimitedFire simulating assembly
US6615519Apr 19, 2001Sep 9, 2003Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US6718665Mar 20, 2002Apr 13, 2004Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US6757487May 8, 2002Jun 29, 2004Cfm CorporationElectric fireplace with light randomizer, filter and diffuser screen
US6944982Sep 27, 2002Sep 20, 2005Napoloen Systems And Developments Inc.Flame simulating apparatus
US6968123Oct 4, 2002Nov 22, 2005Cfm CorporationElectric fire assembly
US7080472Nov 23, 2004Jul 25, 2006Napoleon Systems And Develpements Inc.Flame simulating apparatus
US7134229Jan 20, 2004Nov 14, 2006Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US7162820Jan 20, 2004Jan 16, 2007Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US7194830Dec 17, 2004Mar 27, 2007Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US7236693Mar 22, 2005Jun 26, 2007Globaltec Fireplaces, Inc.Flame simulator for use in an electric heater
US7275838 *Oct 11, 2001Oct 2, 2007Casey Robert WFireplace lighting system
US7373743Mar 14, 2007May 20, 2008Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US7673408Dec 11, 2006Mar 9, 2010Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US7770312Jan 12, 2007Aug 10, 2010Dimplex North America LimitedFlame stimulating assembly
US8361367Nov 29, 2011Jan 29, 2013Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US8480937Jan 2, 2013Jul 9, 2013Dimplex North America LimitedMethod of forming a simulated combustible fuel element
US8661721Aug 8, 2005Mar 4, 2014Kristoffer HessFlame simulating assembly
US20030072159 *Oct 11, 2001Apr 17, 2003Robert W. CaseyFireplace lighting system
US20040165383 *Jan 20, 2004Aug 26, 2004Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US20040181983 *Mar 15, 2004Sep 23, 2004Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US20050063685 *Jan 9, 2003Mar 24, 2005Gary BristowSpace heater
US20050072031 *Jan 20, 2004Apr 7, 2005Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US20050086841 *Nov 23, 2004Apr 28, 2005Napoleon Systems And Developments Inc.Flame simulating apparatus
US20050097793 *Dec 17, 2004May 12, 2005Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US20060026894 *Aug 8, 2005Feb 9, 2006Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US20060101681 *Oct 19, 2005May 18, 2006Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US20060162198 *Jan 21, 2005Jul 27, 2006Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US20060188831 *Feb 18, 2005Aug 24, 2006Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly including an air filter
US20060213097 *Mar 22, 2005Sep 28, 2006Haugom Howard NFlame simulator for use in an electric heater
US20060242870 *Feb 8, 2006Nov 2, 2006Travis Industries, Inc.Flame assembly for fireplace
US20070094903 *Dec 11, 2006May 3, 2007Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US20070107280 *Jan 12, 2007May 17, 2007Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US20070224561 *Mar 7, 2007Sep 27, 2007Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/428
International ClassificationG09F19/10, G09F19/00, F24C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09F19/10, F24C7/004
European ClassificationF24C7/00A2, G09F19/10