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Publication numberUS2285583 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1942
Filing dateApr 13, 1940
Priority dateApr 13, 1940
Publication numberUS 2285583 A, US 2285583A, US-A-2285583, US2285583 A, US2285583A
InventorsLawrence D Jennings, Rea A Taylor
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric & Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface preparation of bearings for babbitting
US 2285583 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9 1942. i L, mgs'g-f L 2,285,583

SURFACE PREPARATION OF BEARINGS FOR BABBITTING Filed April is, 1940 WITNESSES: INVENTORS f v Zawfzfme fl egys v BY 5.x. zm wa v WM ATTORNEY Patented June 9 1942 UNITED STATE PATENT 4 OFFICE Application April 1?, 1940, Serial No. 329,486

13 Claims. (ems-149.5)

Our invention relates, broadly, to bearings, but more particularly relates'to thrust-bearing shoes and their surface preparation for bonding the actual contact substance ,tothe moresubstantial metallic plate forming part of the shoe.

It is an object of our invention tov provide a thrust-bearing shoe comprising a Babbitt-holding plate having a-face or surface which will securely bond or anchor thecont-act substance,

hereinafter called. babbitt;

It is also an object of our invention to provide a thrust-bearing. shoe with increased available surface area for bonding or anchoring the babbitt-to the Babbitt-holding plate. In accordance with the preferred form of our invention, the Babbitt-holding'face of the shoe is formed with numerous, spaced, rough-cut, grooves so that the surface in section has alternating teeth and grooves, with the teeth provided with projecting burs or barbs-the rough-cut surfaces and barbs providing the increased area of contact between the Babbitt-holding plate and the babbitt.

It is a further object of our invention'to provide a new and improved method for-economically making segmental thrust-bearing shoes. In accordance with this aspect of our invention, an annular plate is suitably finished with the proper inner and outer peripheries of the desired contour. The surface to which the babbitt is bonded is first. finished roughly. Ultimately, the annular plate is out along substantially radial lines into segments of the proper length, which are utilized for shoes for the thrust-bearings. In ,furtherance of our invention, the Babbitt- Fig. .4 is a vertical side view of the shoe comprising the Babbitt-holding plate and the babbitt thereon;

Fig. 5 is a schematic plan view on a smaller scale,'for illustrating the manner-in which the thrust-bearing shoes may be obtained from an annular plate;

Fig. 6 is aview similar to Fig. 5 of an annular -plate with a modified form of grooves; and a Fig. 7 is a plan view schematically illustrating a further modification of the face of .a Babbittholding plate.

- Referring to the drawing, the thrust-bearing shoe 2, as shown, has a customary contour, being trapezoidal in shape, with the bases curved,

preferably as arcs of concentric circles, The

, shoe comprises a mild steel,' Babbitt-holding] plate 4 having a back or bottom face 6, a top face 8, and babbitt I B bonded to the topface 8.

The back face 6 is provided with a small countersunk hole [2 for the reception of 'ahardened-steel, load-distributing disc which contacts of the plate 5 for the reception of shoe-loosening bolts. v

In the preparation of the top face 8 the initial surface is preferably rough-finished to provide small closely spaced ridges 9, and then grooved holding face of the annular plate is provided with a' plurality of -rough cut grooves-which can with a dull tool or a tool having negativerake' so that the metal is not cleanly cut out,but is somewhat tom out; that is to say, when the grooves l6 are cut in the top face 8 of the plate, the machining. operation is such that the grooves are obtained by a metal-tearing action. The metal. tearing action may be obtained in any manner well-known to machinistsbut we prefer to do be very conveniently cut into. the annular plate before it is cut into segments.

Further objects, methods and features of our invention will be apparent from the following description and accompanying drawing thereof,

which are confined to so much of the thrustbearing as is necessary to describe our invention to those skilled in the art. The drawing consists of the accompanying figures,'in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a prepared Babbitt-holding plate for a thrust-bearing made, in accordance with our invention;

Fig. 2 is a schematic vertical sectional view of the plate of Fig. 1 with only the barbs at or near the section of the plane shown;

Fig. 3 is a schematic vertical sectional view of the plate but'showing the plate in a prior stage of its manufacture;

negative rake.

the rough cutting of the grooves with a tool of somewhat wavy and rough. Consequently, when babbitt is later applied to this'rough face 8,.th'e additional surface areas of the numerous barbs and waves comprising the surface area of the face, aid in'anchoring or bonding the babbitt to the plate 4. Additionally, it seems that. the different barbs 20 which promiscuously project and protrud from the teeth, serve as anchors forv In the embodiment shown in hardly recognizable as such, being more in the nature of continuous, jagged projections, in turn having numerous barbs protruding from their upper edges.

The grooves may be cut on each segmental shoe independent/Xmas more particularly illustrated in the embodiment shown in Fig. 7. In this em bodiment the innermost grooves 24 are circular and concentric, while the outer grooves 26 are part of a single spiral so that one setting of the cutting machine-tool will cut the complete spiral.

In another'embodiment of our invention, we prefer to prepare a plurality of thrust-bearing shoes at one time. To this end, we suitably prepare an annular .plate 28 having a top, Babbittno barbs'extending considerably above the gen-.

eral planeof the top of the teeth, nor are there any flimsily-secured barbs. v

Fig.3 diagrammatically illustrates the undesirable barbs which are on the face of the plate before the trimming operation.

Where the segmental plates are individually processed, they are, of course, ready for babbitting after the trimming operation. "This is done in the customary manner by cleaning the roughened face 8, tinning, and then applying the required layer of babbitt, preferably in a mould.

shoes by cutting along substantially radial lines,

bonding face to'which the babbitt is ultimately bonded. Completely circular grooves 32 are cut in the face and are concentric about the axis of the annular plate, the cutting being madeby a negative-rake tool, as before, to obtain the jagged, Babbitt-bonding teeth 34, which are shown smooth in Fig. 5 for ease of illustration.

Inanother embodiment shown in Fig. 6.-

grooves 32' in the top Babbitt-bonding face are cut with a single setting of the machine-tool, along-a spiral "with its center substantially at the axisof the annular plate, thereby providing teeth 34. J

By whatever method the topface of the annular plate is prepared,. the result will be a rough, grooved surface having numerous barbs 20. Some of these barbs will be rather flimsily secured to the plate and other of these barbs will extend considerably beyond the general plane of the tops of the teeth. Barbs of the first character are objectionable since, after the babbitt is applied, they might become loose and work through the soft babbitt to its outer bearing-contact surface 36. Barbs of the second character also are objectionable since they might extend too close to the bearing-contact siirface. Consequently, we further process the Babbitt-holding plate or annular plate by machining off all barbs extending a predetermined distance above the general plane of the teeth. To do this, the plate is machined by a flat-nosed surfacing tool, the cutting edge of the tool being a slight distance from the teeth. This machining operation cuts down the large barbs, turning over some of them, and breaks, off those barbs which are only flimsily secured -to the body of the Babbitt-holding plate. As an tadded precaution, after the plate has been trimmed, the Babbitt-holding face may be strongly Just how far the barbs should be trimmed will, of course, depend upon the thickness of this layer of babbitt, but they should not extend too close to the outer contact surface of the babbitt.

If the segmental shoes are made from the annular plates, as described, it is preferable to babbitt the entire annular. plate, and then cut this babbitted plate into the required segmental indicated broken in-Figs. 5 and 6.

While we have shown our invention in a manner in which we believe to be the preferred forms' thereof, it is obvious that many modifications may be made therein, and the rough and jagged surfaces for anchoring the babbitt'obtained in many manners.

We claim as our invention:

1. A bearing comprising, a substantially flat annular plate having a surface for babbitting,

said surface being formedwith a plurality of spaced, substantially-concentric, grooves defining alternating teeth, the surface being generally rough, and the teeth somewhat jagged.

2. In the making of a- Babbitt-holding member for a bearing, the steps which comprise rough-cutting, with a metal-tearing action, the

- face of said member to which the babbit is to be bonded, then cutting down the barbs formed by said rough-cutting step, which protrude a predetermined distance beyond said face, and remov-' ing barbs which are not sufficiently strongly attached to said member.

3. In the making ofa Babbitt-holding member for a bearing, the steps which comprise roughcutting, with a metal-tearing action, the face of said member to which the babbitt is to be bonded, then cutting down the barbs formed by said rough-cutting step, which protrude a predetermined distance beyond said face.

brushed with a stiff wire brush to remove any remaining flimsily-secured barbs. Figs. 1 and 2 generally depict a Babbitt-holding plate after such a trimming operation. Because of the tearing operation, no two plates will be exactly alike,

but these figures illustrate the general effects of the rough, metal-tearing cutting, and trimmingh 1 It may be observed from Fig. 2 that there are 4. .In the making of a Babbitt-holding plate for a. shoe of a thrust-bearing, the step which comprises rough-machining, with a metal-tearing action, a plurality of spaced grooves in the face of said plate to which the babbitt is to be bonded.

5. In the making of a Babbitt-holding plate for a shoe of a thrust-bearing. the steps which comprise, rough-machining the face of an annular plate, and then cutting said plate along substantially radial lines-into segments for bearing s oes.

- a 6. In the making of a Babbitt-holding plate for a shoe of a. thrust-bearing, the steps which comprise, rough-machining, with a metal-tearing action, a plurality of spaced grooves in the face of an annular plate, and then cutting said plate along-substantially radial lines into segments for bearing shoes.

.7. In the making of a Babbitt-holding plate for a shoe of a thrust-bearing, the steps which comprise, cutting, in the face of an annular plate, spaced grooves substantially-concentric about the axis of said plate, and then cutting said -11. A Babbitt-holding metal plate for a bear-.

plate along substantially radial 1ines, into segments for bearing shoes.

9. In the making of a Babbitt-holding plate for a shoe of a thrust-bearing, the steps which comprise, cutting, with a metal-tearing action. spaced, substantially-concentric grooves in the face of an annular plate, then cutting down the barbs formed by said rough cutting step, and removing barbs which are not sufficiently firmly attached to said plate. I

10. In the making of a Babbitt-holding plate for a shoe of a thrust-bearing, the steps which comprise, cutting, with a metal-tearing action, spaced, substantially-concentric grooves in the face of an annular plate, then cutting down the barbs formed by said rough-cutting step, removing barbs which are not sufficiently attached to said plate, tinning said face, babbitting said face,

and then cutting the resulting plate along substantially radial lines into segments for hearing shoes.

ing, adapted to have babbit bonded or anchored thereto, said plate having a rough, irregular and jagged face, said face having a pluralityof grooves therein, and th lateral walls of the grooves having irregular, -overhanging tornshaped pieces of the metal thereof extending into the grooves and providing irregular, tornshaped depressions in the lateral walls of the grooves.

12. A segmental shoe for a thrust-bearing com prising a Babbitt-holding plate adapted to have babbitt bonded or anchored thereon, the contact face of said plate to which the babbitt is bonded or anchored comprising a plurality of alternating, extended teeth and grooves having roughened surfaces, the teeth being jagged, rough, and

irregular.

13. A metallic Babbitt-holding member for a bearing, adapted to'have babbitt bonded or anchored thereon, the contact faceof said member to which the babbitt is bonded or anchored having a plurality of alternating extended jagged teeth and grooves substantially such'as would be obtained by machiningthe grooves in said member with a metal-tearing action,

LAWRENCE D.- JENNINGS. REA A. TAYLOR.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification384/420, 164/111, 29/527.4, 277/922, 29/898.12, 428/609, 82/1.11
International ClassificationB21K1/04, B21K25/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S277/922, B21K25/00
European ClassificationB21K25/00