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Publication numberUS2286171 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1942
Filing dateNov 27, 1941
Priority dateNov 27, 1941
Publication numberUS 2286171 A, US 2286171A, US-A-2286171, US2286171 A, US2286171A
InventorsKrasnov George S, Krasnov Norman I
Original AssigneeKrasnov George S, Krasnov Norman I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Slip cover for furniture
US 2286171 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9, 1942. G. s. KRASNOV E'r AL 2,286,171

SLIP COVER Filed Nov. 27, 1941 5 Sheets-sheet, 1

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Patented June 9, 1942 OFFICE SLIP COVER FOR FURNITURE George S. Krasnov and Norman I. Krasnov,

Melrose Park, Pa.

Application November 27, 1941, Serial No. 420,724

4 Claims.

The present invention relates to a certain new and useful slip-cover for overstuffed upholstered furniture, and relates more particularly to sli-pcovers made of relatively non-elastic or nonstretchable woven textile fabric panels throughout their exposed portions, but which will, nevertheless, t the furniture and be maintained` neatly -thereon notwithstanding slight variations in size of the furniture or notwithstanding shrinkage of the fabric.

The present invention, while yalso useful for ready-made slip-covers for furniture such as chairs and the like, is also desirable in custommade or made-to-measure slip-covers.

With the above and other objects in view which will appear more fully from the following description, the present invention consists of a slipcover formed of relatively non-elastic and relatively non-stretchable firm woven panels throughout the exposed parts of the slip-cover, namely throughout the front panel of the back of the chair, throughout the arms, seat, sides and front of the chair, and having the sides and front panel of the back of the chair extend slightly over and beyond the rear periphery of the back of the chair, and there joined either permanently or part permanently and part detach-ably to a rear elastic panel, which tends to draw the peripheral edges rearwardly and thus tends to keep the entire non-elastic Woven fabric slip-cover under tension which is countered in a horizontal direction by the sides and front of the slip-cover which, together with the rear elastic panel, form a complete circle around the slipcover in a generally horizontal plane, and which is countered in a vertical plane lby bottom anchorage tabs concealed beneath the skirt of the slip-cover, thereby to maintain the slip-cover in a neat taut manner at all times with a minimum distortion or wrinkling and to permit the slipcover to ex-pand and contract or to breathe responsive to the pulling and relaxing influences upon thefront of the slip-cover when the Achair i s,vinactua1 use, namely when the soft and yieldablef.portions of the upholstery are alternately compressed and permitted to relax.

With the above and other objects in view, the present invention consists of other novel features and phases of construction all of which will appear more fully from the following detailed description and accompanying drawings.

In the accompanying drawings in which lik reference characters indicate like parts,V

Figure 1 represents a perspective view of the rear and side of a slip-'cover embodying the present invention, shown as applied to an overstuifed upholstered arm-chair.

Figure 2 represents a bottom and rear perspective view of the same. Figure 3 represents a fragmentary rear and side elevational view similar to that shown in Figure 1 but showing a somewhat modified form of construction.

Figure 4 represents a front and side elevationalV slip-cover of the present invention, viewed from` v one surface thereof, but shown on a much enlarged scale, namely, a scale of approximately ten or fourteen times actual size, and shown more or lessschematically insofar as the thread formations are shown as they would appear 4if the rear panel were stretched out completely, in both directions, so as better to show the interlacing of the relatively non-elastic textile body yarns and the covered-rubber elastic threads; the courses extending `parallel to the greater dimension of this figure, and wales extending parallel to the smaller dimension of this figure.

Figure 9 represents a plan view, similar to that shown in Figure 8, showing the other side of the fabric shown in Figure 8. l

Figure 10 represents a fragmentary plan view of another elastic fabric structure, exemplifying a modified form of construction suitable for the rear tensioning and breathing panel of the slip-cover of the present invention, viewed from one surface thereof, but shown on a still further enlarged scale, wherein a relatively thin and smooth-surfaced textile thread or yarn, as for instance rayon or Nylon or mercerized cotton yarn or Celanese yarn, extends through the .fabric alongside the rubber thread therein, so as to act as a snubber and protective element in the rear panel. I 1

Figure 11 represents a fragmentary plan view of the fabric shown in Figure 10, but showing the other side thereof.

According to the present invention the slipcover is composed of a series of joined non-elastic and non-stretchable woven textile fabric panels including the front back panel 2l, the seat panel 2|', the side arm panels 22 which may extend over the arms 23 to form the outer side panels -24 of the slip-cover, and a front panel 25. These panels may be joined along the seam lines 26, 21, 2l, 26 and 36 and each of these panels may in turn lbe subdivided or made of two or more'separate pieces, seamed together, as

for instance by making the top part of the back of the slip-cover out of a separate panel 3|, seamed to the panel 26 along the seam line 32.

The rear periphery of the side panels 24 and of the back panel 20 (or 3l) are extended slightly around to the customarily concealed back of the furniture so that their marginal portions 33. 34 and 35 are folded back of the furniture, where they are united along suitable lines 56, 59 and 66 of sewn stitches to a concealed rear tensioning and breathing panel 36 formed of an elastic and self-contracting, preferably rubbercontaining knitted or woven textile webbing, which may either be the same color as the exposed woven body of the slip-cover or may be of a contrasting though harmonizing color.

Thus, while the main exposed woven body of the slip-cover may be of a figured pattern, the rear and more or less concealed tensioning and breathing panel 36 may be of more or less the same color but without the figures or pattern effects of the body of the slip-cover.

` kAlong a line preferably slightly above the bottom horizontal edge 31 of the frame of the furniture, a pleated or plain fabric skirt 6I or a fringed skirt ls sewn or otherwise secured to the sides 24 and to the front 25 of the slip-cover generally along the lines 38. The Woven fabric sides and front of the slip-cover are either folded under and continued beneath the lowermost horizontal frame of the chair or sofa, in the form of the anchorage or tensioning tabs 39 and 40, or separate tensioning tabs 39 and 46 may be sewn to the lower marginal portions of the sides 24 and front 25 of the slip-cover to extend beneath the furniture and provided with suitable tubular heme-4I through which a draw-string 42 may be extended for pulling the tabs together and holding them together under more or less tension. A similar tab 43 may be sewn tothe bottom zone of the rear tensioning and "breathing panel 36, along a line 44 slightly above the bottom marginal edge 31 of the frame of the furniture. The anchorage tabs 36, 40 and 43 may also be otherwise secured in piace, without the drawstring or similar flexible tensioning member, as for instance, by being tacked to the under-surface of the horizontal lbottom frame members of the chair or sofa. They may likewise be held in place by tensioning members extended across the juxtaposed tabs. Thus, for instance' one or two tensioning members may be detachably connected with the tabs-38, while other sets of tensioning members may be extended across or detachably or permanently secured to the tabs 40 and 43. The rear tensioning and 'breathing" panel 36 may extend below the line 44 as illustrated in Figures l, 2, 3, and 5, or it may extend merely to the juncture line 44. The lower edge 45 of the panel 36 may be further provided with an elastic edging or hemming ma.-

aioning and "breathing panel 36 may be provided with detachable separable fastening means, such as the interlocking chain of slide-cam operable links 46;. which slide fastener may extend from the botwm to a suitable point near the ywidest portion "41 of the back of the chair, so

as to permit the effective bottom dimension of the slip-cover across the back of the chair to be reduced to the minimum, so that when the opening shown in Figure 3 is closed by the closure of the slide fastener, the slip-cover will be uniformly tensioned in all horizontal planes.

The cushion part 46 of the slip-cover, shown separately in Figures 6 and 7, also is preferably provided with inturned marginal portions 49 and 50 extending from the corresponding sides 5I and 52 of the cushion part of the slip-cover, three of said inturned marginal portions being permanently and one of said inturned marginal portions being detachably secured to a concealed tensioning and breathingf panel 53 of a character similar to that of the panel 36. The detachably-secured inturned marginal portion may be detachably secured by snap fasteners or buttons having complementary parts 54 and 55, so that after the cushion part of the slip-cover is 1 pulled over the cushion 56, the panel 53' may terial such as an elastic cord sewn thereto with be joined on all four sides to the body of the cushion cover which is made of non-elastic woven fabric similar to that of 'which the body part of the main slip-cover is made, so that the ul)- per non-elastic woven panel 51 and the side panels 5I and 52 will be constantly tensioned and so that any pressure placed on the cushion will not unduly compress the stuffing in the cushion but will permit the concealed elastic panel 53 to expand responsive to any pressure from above.

Two forms of elastic fabric suitable for the panels 36 and 53 are illustrated in Figures 8, 9,

-10 and ll, it being understood that these are merely illustrative of typical fabrics suitable for these panels and no claim is made to the internal structure of these fabrics.

'I'he elastic fabrics shown in Figures 8, 9, l0

and l1 may be made either on a flat knitting machine or on a circular knitting machine; preferably thelatter, and are preferably so knitted as to have forceful contraction in two directions.

In the drawings of Figures 8, 9, 10 and 1l, the numeral I2 designates cotton or similar thread forming the principal body of the fabric, while numeral I3 designates rubber strands interknitted therewith in the manner indicated or in any similar manner to give two-way contraction to the fabric; the rubber strands I3 preferably being of the composite character indicated schematically infragmentary enlargement at the bottom of Figure 8, namely, having a center core I4 of rubber surrounded by two oppositely wound spiral wrappings I5 and I6, respectively, of cotton or similar textile yarn. In the form of construction shown in Figures 10 and 11 a supplementary snubber thread or safety thread I1 is provided alongside the rubber thread I3, for limiting the stretch ofrubber.

The rear, concealed tensioning and breather panel 36 not only serves to yield or to breath" responsive to stresses or pull exerted upon the relatively non-elastic woven panels constituting the main exposed body of the slip-cover, so that such main body will not tear or rupture at the sewn seams where its woven panels are joined, but also serves as a means for permitting some dimensional variations in the furniture to be covered, and so that the slip-cover may be drawn non-stretchable woven textile panels.A This ad- U justment for slight variations in the dimensions of the furniture to be covered is made ,possible without ever exposing to view (from the front or sides) the elastic self-contracting breather panel 36, because the breather panel 36 is of an area substantially less than the rear surface of the back of the furniture, and because the sides and top of the woven fabric panels constituting the main body of the slip-cover extend beyond the rear periphery of the back of the slip-cover and are folded inwardly to meet the breather panelalong a line spaced substantially inwardly from such periphery.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof, and it is therefore desired that the present embodiments be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, reference being had to the appended claims rather than to the foregoing description to indicate the scope of the invention.

Having thus described our invention, we hereby claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent the following:

1. A slip-cover for overstuffed upholstered furniture having seat, arms and back, said slipcover being formed of relatively non-stretchable woven textile fabric panels joined together and covering the seat and enveloping said arms and covering the sides and front of the furniture and also covering the front andtop and side surfaces of the back of the furniture and extending slightly behind the back along the top and side peripheral margins of the rear surface of the back of the furniture to form inturned margins behind the back of the furniture of more or less uniform width, a stretchable and self-contracting tensioning and breather textile panel of a shape generally similar to the shape of the rear surface of the back of the furniture and of an area less than the rear surface-area of the back of the furniture, disposed behind the back of the furniture and substantially concealed from view from the front of the furniture and joined to the in-turned marginal portions of the nonstretchable woven textile fabric of the main body of the slip-cover along the side and top marginal portions thereof behind the back of the furniture, thereby to tension the non-stretchable woven textile portions of the slip-cover both horizontally and vertically around the furniture and to permit the relatively non-stretchable woven textile panels of the slip-cover to yield or to breathe. responsive to stresses or pull exerted upon such panels while the slip-cover is in use without tearing or rupturing the sewn seams by which such relatively non-stretchable woven textile panels of the slip-cover are joined to each other, and anchorage means connected with the lower marginal portions of said slip-cover and extending beneath the lowermost horizontal -frame portion of the furniture and detachably secured in place therebeneath.

2. A slip-cover for overstuffed upholstered furniture having seat, arms and back, said slip-cover being formed of relatively non-stretchable woven textile fabric panels joined together and covering the seat and enveloping said arms and covering the sides and front of the furniture and also covering the front and top and side surfaces of the back of the furniture and extending slight- 1y behind the back along the top and sideperipheral margins of the rear surface of the back of the furniture, a stretchable and self-contracting knitted tensioning and breather textile panel of-a shape generally similar to the shape of the rear surface of the back of the furniture Vand of an areav less than the rear surface-area of the back of the furniture, disposed behind the back of thefurniture and substantially concealed from fview from the front of the furniture and joined to the in-turned' marginal portions of the non-stretchable woven textile fabric of the main body of the slip-cover along the side and top marginal portions thereof behind the back of the furniture, thereby to tension the non-stretchable woven textile portions of the slip-cover both horizontally and vertically around the furniture and to permit the relatively non-stretchable woven textile panels of the slip-cover to yield or to breathe" responsive to stresses or pull exerted upon such panels while the slip-cover is in use without tearing or rupturing the sewn seams by which such relatively non-stretchable woven textile panels of the slipcover are joined to each other, and anchorage means connected with the lower marginal portions of the side and front of the woven body of the slip-cover and with the lower marginal portion of the rear breather panel and extending beneath the lowermost horizontal frame portion of the furniture and .detachably secured in place therebeneath.

3. A slip-cover for overstuifed upholstered furniture having seat, arms and back, said slip-cover being formed of relatively non-stretchable woven textile fabric panels joined together and covering the seat and enveloping said arms and covering the sides and front of the furniture and also covering the front and top and side surfaces of the back of the furniture and extending slightly behind the back along the top and side peripheral margins of the rear surface of the back of the furniture, a stretchable and selfcontracting tensioning and breather textile panel of a shape generally similar to the shape of the rear surface of the back of the furniture and of an area less than the rear surface-area of the back of the furniture, disposed behind the back of the furniture and substantially concealed from view from the front of the furniture and joined to the in-turned marginal portions of the non-stretchable woven textile fabric of the main body of the slip-cover along the side and top marginal portions thereof behind the back of the furniture, thereby to tension the nonstretchable woven textile portions of the slipcover both horizontally and vertically around the furniture and to permit the relativelynonstretchable woven textile panels of the slip-cover to yield or to breathe responsive to stresses or pull exerted upon such panels while the slipcover is in use without tearing or rupturing the sewn seams by which such relatively nonstretchable woven textile panels of the slipcover are joined to each other, anchorage means connected with the lower marginal portions of the side and front of the woven body of the slipcover and with the lower marginal portion of the rear breather panel and extending beneath the lowermost horizontal frame portion of the furniture and detachably secured in place therebeneath, and a skirt portion secured to the front and sides of the slip-cover near the lower marginal portions thereof, but along a line slightly Y above the lowermost horizontal edge of the furniture.

4.' A slip-cover for overstuied upholstered fur- ,niture having seat, arms and back, said slip-cover being formed of relatively non-elastic woven marginal portions of the non-elastic textile woven fabric along the side and top marginal portions thereof behind the back of the furniture, thereby to tension the non-elastic woven textile portions of the slip-cover both horizontally and vertically around the furniture and to permit the relatively non-elastic woven textile panels of the slip-cover toyield or to breathe responsive to stresses or pull exerted upon such panels while the slip-cover is in use without tearing or rupturing the sewn seams by which the relatively non-elastic woven textile panels of the slipcover are joined to each other. and anchorage means connectedwith the'lower marginal p0rtions of said slip-cover and extending beneath the lowermost horizontal frame portion of the furniture and detachably secured in place therebeneath.

GEORGE S. KRASNOV. NQRMAN I. KRASNOV.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2563203 *Dec 23, 1948Aug 7, 1951Yerby Elfreda MCovering for cricket type chairs
US2667211 *Nov 8, 1948Jan 26, 1954Krasnov George SSlip cover for upholstered furniture
US2921625 *Jan 25, 1954Jan 19, 1960Krasnov George SAdjustable ready made slip cover
US3013420 *Dec 3, 1957Dec 19, 1961Cormier Hosiery Mills IncElastic fabric for a stocking top
US4047756 *Oct 1, 1975Sep 13, 1977Yoshida Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaChair construction and method of assembling the same
US6354661 *Jan 4, 2000Mar 12, 2002Anne Masako MossChair cocoon
US7152929 *Apr 20, 2005Dec 26, 2006Comfordy Co., Ltd.Structure of a double-mesh seat of a chair
US8500198Jul 28, 2010Aug 6, 2013Toyota Boshoku Kabushiki KaishaVehicle seat cover
DE102010039466A1 *Aug 18, 2010Mar 31, 2011Toyota Boshoku Kabushiki Kaisha, Kariya-shiFahrzeugsitzabdeckung
DE102010039466A8 *Aug 18, 2010Feb 9, 2012Toyota Boshoku Kabushiki KaishaFahrzeugsitzabdeckung
EP0270014A2 *Nov 27, 1987Jun 8, 1988Wolfgang SteilingOrthopedic pillow
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/224, 66/198, 297/228
International ClassificationA47C31/11, A47C31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47C31/11
European ClassificationA47C31/11