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Publication numberUS2286926 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 16, 1942
Filing dateOct 4, 1939
Priority dateOct 4, 1939
Publication numberUS 2286926 A, US 2286926A, US-A-2286926, US2286926 A, US2286926A
InventorsParenti Joseph S
Original AssigneeFluidpoise Mfg Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pumping mechanism
US 2286926 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 16, 1942. s, PARENT! PUMPING MECHANISM Filed Oct. 4, 1939 s Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEYS Same 1%, J. 5. PARENT] 2,2332% PUMPING MECHANISM Filed Oct. 4, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATT ORNEYS June 16, 1942.

J. 5. PARENTE PUMPING MECHANISM Filed Oct. 4, 1939 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTORNEYS Patented June 16, 1942 PUMPING MECHANISM Joseph S. Parenti, Buffalo, N. Y., assignor to The Fluidpoise Manufacturing Company, Inc., Buffalo, N. Y.

Application October 4, 1939, Serial No. 292,904

3 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in pumps of the kind which are particularly adapted for pumping deep wells, and in which the pumping mechanism is located in the Well and is actuated by variations in pressure of the pumped liquid.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a pumping mechanism of this type of improved and simplified construction. Another object is to construct a pumping mechanism of this type which may be made mainly of tubular parts of standard construction and sizes. A further object is to provide a pumping mechanism of this kind in which the power piston includes a tube which forms a passage for the fluid which is being pumped and which also acts as a piston rod to transmit force from the power or pressure actuated piston to the pumping piston.

Another object of this invention is to provide a pumping mechanism of this type which is so constructed that any pressure existing in the well acts to supplement the action of the spring or other yielding means which move the movable part of the pump through one stroke.

Another object of this invention is to provide the pumping mechanism with an improved hollow tubular piston arranged in such a manner with reference to other parts of the pump that while opposite faces of the piston are acted upon by fluid pressure, the cups or piston packing employed need only act in one direction to resist passage of liquid past the same.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a pump of this kind in which the recipro-' catory part is so formed that it may extend to a considerable depth below the pumping mechanism and may reciprocate in the fluid to be pumped. Another object is to provide a construction whereby the reciprocation of a part of the pump in the fluid to be pumped serves to maintain the passages for the fluid leading to the pump free from obstructions.

Other objects of this invention will appear from the following description and claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is an elevation, partly in section, showing an improved pumping mechanism embodying this invention arranged in a well and also showing apparatus above the ground for producing variations in the pressure of the pumped liquid.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary central sectional elevation of a pumping mechanism of modified construction.

Figs. 3 and 4 are central sectional elevations of a portion of the pumping mechanism shown in.

herein illustrated in detail.

Fig. 1, the section being taken online 33, Fig. 1, and Fig. 4 representing the continuation of the lower portion of Fig. 3.

Figs. 5 and 6 are views similar to'Figs. 3 and 4, but showing the parts of the pumping mechanism in different positions.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary central sectional elevation of a pumpingmechanism of a modified construction.

Fig. 8 is a central sectional elevation of a pumping mechanism of still another modified form.

In the upper portion of Fig. 1, there is shown by way of example, a mechanism for supplying variations or pulsations in pressure to my improved pumping mechanism which is located in the well, and it will be understood that any means for producing pressure variations or pulsations in the pumped fluid may be employed. In this figure, l0 represents a tank or reservoir for the pumped liquid, that shown being in the form of a tank having an air or gas cushion in the upper portion thereof which exerts a pressure on the liquid in the tank so that the same may be readily conducted through pipes to wherever it may be needed. Pressure systems of this type are old and well known and are not In this figure, II designates a motor for supplying power to the pumping mechanism, and this motor may, if desired, be operated in any well known manner by pressure actuated control means (not shown),

which start the motor when the pressure falls below a certain point and which stop the motor when the pressure reaches the desired high point. The motor shown is connected with a driving belt 12 which transmits power to a wheel l5 which may be connected by any means (not shown), such for example as a Scotch yoke mechanism, to the piston rod 16 to which a piston l! is secured. This piston is arranged to reciprocate in the cylinder 18 arranged Within a housing IS in such a manner that an annular space is provided between the cylinder I 8 and the housing l9, into which space the pumped liquid is discharged from the cylinder [8 through suitable apertures 20 arranged therein. 2| represents a discharge pipe extending from the housing 1 9 to the tank 10.

The housing 19 is connected at its lower end with a pipe or duct 24 for the liquid which is being pumped and through which pressure pulsations .or impulses may be transmitted by means of the pump mechanism which has just been described. It will be obvious that When the piston I1 is moved upwardly, fluid may pass upwardly through the pipe or duct 24 into the cylinder l8, it being understood that the fluid in the pipe or duct 24 is under pressure due to the pumping mechanism located below the surface. Consequently, fluid passing into the cylinder l3 will flow outwardly through the apertures 20 when the piston I1 is moved upwardly to a suffici'ent extent to uncover these apertures. During the downward stroke of the piston i1, additional liquid may be forced outwardly through the apertures 20 until these apertures are covered by the piston whereupon further downward movement of the piston produces pressure in the pumped fluid which is transmitted downwardly through the pipe or duct 24 to the pumping mechanism located below the ground. As has been stated, any other means for producing variations in pressure in the liquid in the pipe'or duct 24 and for permitting the discharge of pumped fluid through this pipe or duct may be employed.

My improved pumping mechanism may operate in any type of well or other source of fluid to be pumped, and in the construction illustrated, 25 represents the lining or casing of the well, which may extend below the level of the liquid in the well. The upper portion of the casing 25 may be closed, as indicated at 21, this closure being particularly desirable in the case of' an oil well having gas under pressure therein.

In the form of my pumping mechanism shown in Figs. 1 and 3 to 6 inclusive, this mechanism includes an outer tubular part or housing, that shown being formed in two sections 30 and 3| connected together by a suitable coupling member 32. The upper end of the outer tubular member 3|) is secured to a connecting member 33 which connects it with the fluid delivery pipe or duct 24. This coupling member 33 as shown is of annular form having a threaded engagement with the fluid delivery duct 24 and with the upper section 30 of the outer tubular member.

A portion of the lower part 3| of the outer tubular member forms a cylinder within which a power piston, actuated by pressure pulsations of the pumped liquid, operates. This power piston includes an inner tubular member 35 having outwardly extending parts secured thereto, which form an annular piston upon which the pressure of the pumped fluid may act. These outwardly extending parts preferably include suitable packing means, such for example as the usual hydraulic collars or cup leathers 36 and 31, formed of leather or other suitable material and held in operative relation to the inner tubular member 35 by any suitable means, such as a rigid collar 38 secured on the outer surface of this tubular member, and a pair of threaded collars 39 and. remo'vably secured to the tubular member 35 and supporting the cups 3B and 31 in their operative positions. The middle collar 39, as shown, also acts as a, coupling for connecting two pipe sections which together form the inner tubular member 35.

I also provide within the upper portion of the outer tubular member 30 a pumping cylinder 42, that shown being in the form of a pipe or tube having its lower end secured to the coupling member 32 which connects the two parts 3| and 32 of the outer housing or tube of the pumping mechanism. The tube or cylinder 42 has apertures 43 arranged at intervals thereon immediately above the coupling member 32. The upper end of this tubular pumping cylinder is provided with a suitable discharge valve, that shown including a spider 44 suitably secured to the upper end of the tube 42 and a check valve 45 which may be of any suitable or desired construction, that shown being of the disk type having a valve stem 46 slidable in the spider 44 and provided with a spring 47 which serves to hold the valve normally in closed position.

In the construction shown in Figs. 1 and 3, 4, and 6, the inner tubular member 35 forms a part of both the power piston and the pump piston. Consequently, the upper part of the tubular member 35 extends into the pumping cylinder 42 and is provided with suitable packing means, that shown by way of example including a flanged tubular member 50 having a threaded engagement with the inner surface of the upper end of the tube 35. A pair of cup leathers or other flange of the member 50.

packing members 5| and 52 are suitably secured between the tube 35 and the flanged member 50, the lower cup 5| having one end thereof held between the upper end of the tube 35 and a metal sleeve or collar 53. The other cup 52 is held between the other end of this sleeve 53 and the Any other means for providing a packing may be provided.

It will be noted that these packing members 5| and 52 face downwardly and are, consequently, more efficient as packing against pressure exerted upwardly from the under face thereof, whereas the pressure stroke of the pumping piston is upward. The reason for this is that the pressure pulsations of the pumped fluid pass from the discharge pipe or duct 24 downwardly in the space between the outer tube section 30 and the pumping cylinder or tube 42 and through the apertures 43 therein. Consequently, during the pressure pulsations of the pumped fluid, the cups 5| and 52 will be urged against the inner surface of the tube 42 and thus provide a secure packing. Because of the clearance between the coupling member 32 and the inner tubular member 35, the pressure pulsations pass downwardly into the space between the outer tubular section 3| and the inner tubular member 35 and act upon the upper face of the annular power piston formed on the tubular member 35. During this pressure impulse, the tube 35 and the two pistons will be moved downwardly due to the fact that the top surface of the annular power piston on the tube 35 has a materially greater area than of the packing member 5| against which the pressure of the pumped fluid also acts.

The downward movement of the tube 35 is the intake stroke during which the valve 45 remains closed and during which a foot valve 55 of any suitable or desired construction opens. This foot valve 55 as shown is arranged in a housing 56 secured to the bottom of the inner tube 35, but may be located in any desired place in the tube 35. During this downward or suction stroke, the pressure pulsation of the pumped fluid causes liquid to flow upwardly in the suction tube 35 and into the pumping cylinder 42. The pressure pulsation also stores energy in any suitable yielding or resilient means, for example, in a coil spring 60 arranged between the inner and outer tubular parts 35 and 3| and abutting at its upper end against the ring or collar 38 of the power piston and at its lower end against a ring or shoulder 5| secured within the lower end of the outer tubular member 3|. Attention is called to the fact that this ring 6| has an internal diameter considerably larger than the external diameter of the inner tube 35, thus providing a clearance or passage 62 through which any pressure that may be existing in the well may act in a direction to urge the power piston upwardly, and thus supplement the action of the spring 60.

After the pressure of the pumped fluid is decreased by the upward movement of the piston I1, the power and pumping pistons will be moved upwardly through their pumping stroke by means of the spring 60. Figs. 3 and 4 show the pistons and the piston tube 35 in their lower positions in which the upper discharge valve 45 is closed and the intake or foot valve 55 is open to admit fluid to be pumped into the tube 35. In these figures, the spring 6% is compressed. In Figs. and 6, the parts are shown at or near their upper position into which they are moved by the energy stored in the spring 58. During this upward movement, the foot valve 55 is closed while the discharge valve 5 is open, so that some of the liquid above the pumping piston is discharged into the discharge duct 26. This raises the column of liquid in that duct 26; and causes liquid from the upper end of this column to be discharged through the apertures 26 from the upper cylinder 58.

It will be noted that the cup leathers and 3'! of the power piston have their expansible edges facing the cup leathers 5i and 52 of the pumping piston. This enables these cup leathers or gasket to resist leakage most efficiently during pressure pulsations. During the pumping or upward stroke of the pumping piston, small quantitie of liquid may flow past the cup leathers El and 52, but it is, of course, immaterial whether liquid passes out of punp-ing cylinder to the column of pumped liquid through the valve 45 or past these cup leathers.

I have found that the efliciency of this pump and the amount of pressure required in the pumped fluid may be materially reduced by making the pipe as long as may be practically possible, in view of the pressure acting on the liquid in the bottom of the well. For example, in the case of a water well in which atmospheric pressure acts on the water in the bottom of the well, the length of the pipe 35 below the valve should not be in excess of about twenty-five feet. If a gas pressure is maintained in the well which acts on the liquid to be pumped, the length of the pipe 35 may, of course, be increased proportionally to this pressure. The lengthening of the pipe 35 makes it possible to locate the pump ing mechanism at a distance materially above the level of the liquid to be pumped, and consequently, decrease the head or height of the column of liquid acting on the upper face of the power piston. This in turn makes it possible to decrease the size or strength of the spring til, thus making it possible to operate the pumping mechanism below the ground at reduced pressures. The weight of the tubular member 35 and the liquid contained therein may, of course, be reduced by making aportion of the tube 35 be low the pumping mechanism of decreased di- .ameter and of metals of light weight, so that the weight of this tube together with the liquid contained therein will not 'bea serious factor in the loading of the spring 63. This is due to the fact that the pressure placed on the spring due to the weight only of the tube 35 and liquid. contained therein is much less than the pressure that would result, if the length of the tube 35 were added to the height of the column of liquid acting onthe power piston, since this latter pressure would have to be multiplied by the total area of the power piston. Furthermore, as has been stated, the upward flow in the tube 3-5 is produced by the pressure pulsation in the pumped fluid, whereas upward flow of the remainder of thecolumn of liquid above the tube 35 is effected by the spring.

By means of the tubular construction of the piston, the usual piston rod is eliminated and the power transmitted to the power piston is com ducted to the pumping piston by the tube 35. Thisarrangement also makes it possible to use relatively large valves which facilitate the flow of liquid into and .out of the piston.

In the modified construction shown in Fig. 2, 6.5 represent the outer tubular member. The power piston is formed by .a short intermediate tubular member 65 having .an outwardly extending flange .67 .at the lower portion thereof which is provided with any suitable packing means cooperating with the interior of the tube The upper part of this tubular member is provided with a discharge valve 88, that shown being pivoted at 69. A spring Til which performs the up ward stroke of the power piston is arranged below this piston, the upper portion of the spring engaging the lower face of the flange the lower end of the spring resting upon the closure ii at the lower end of the outer tube 65. n inner tubular member id is arranged in the lo portion of the outer tubular member @5 and is suitably secured to the lower end thereof. Ihe closure member H for the outer tube 5:: is pro vided with an inlet opening it closed by means of a suitable foot valve It. The upper end of the inner tubular member it is provided with an outwardly extending or flanged upper end ll pro-- vided with suitable packing means for forming a substantially liquid-tight slidable connection with the interior of the movable piston member 66.

In the operation of this pumping mechanism, the pressure of the pumped fluid causes the piston member 65 to move downwardly to compress the spring it. During this downward move ment, any fluid entrapped between the foot valve 15 and the discharge Valve 38 is forced out through the discharge valve into the outer tubular member 65, from which it may into a discharge pipe (not shown) similar to the 2d shown in Figs. 1 and 3 to 6. In this modified form shown in Fig. 2, the spring "it, during the period of reduced pressure of the pumped fluid, moves the piston member 66 upwardly, causing liquid to be drawn in past the foot valve it, thus filling the space within the tubular member id and the portion of the tubular piston above the tubular member "I l. The spring Tiil while ex-- panding also raises the column of pumped liquid.

In this construction, the lower end of the outer tubular member 65 is provided with suitable openings Ii) through which any pressure existing in the lower part of the well may act on the lower face of the flange 61 of the piston member, and thus supplement the action of the spring it. If any liquid enters through the apertures 19 during the upward movement of the piston member 96, such liquid will be forced outwardly through the openings 79 during the downward movement of the piston member 68. It will also be obvious that in this construction, the inner tube l4 may extend downwardly to a much greater extent than shown in Fig. 2, so that for deep wells, the load on the spring it may be proportionally reduced.

In the modified construction shown in Fig. 7, 84 represents the liquid discharge pipe which corresponds to the discharge pipe 24 shown in Figs. 1 and 3 to 6. The lower end of this supply pipe is rigidly secured to a head 85 of a pumping cylinder 86. This cylinder head 85 has a discharge aperture in the upper portion thereof with which a discharge valve 81 cooperates. The discharge pipe 84 is provided immediately above the cylinder head 85 with a plurality of openings 88 through which the pumped liquid may pass into a space formed at the upper portion of an outer power cylinder 90 of the pumping mechanism. In this construction, the pumping cylinder 86 remains stationary during the operation of the pump and the outer tube or cylinder 90 reciprocates. This outer cylinder or tube 90 is provided at its upper end with a head 9I provided with an aperture through which the fluid discharge pipe 84 passes, and suitable packing 92, held in place by means of a packing nut 93, serves to form a tight but slidable joint between the outer cylinder head 9I and the liquid discharge pipe 84. The pumping cylinder 86 also has suitable packing 95 arranged near the upper and lower portions thereof to form a liquid tight slidable connection between. the pumping cylinder and the outer tube 90.

At the lower end of the outer tube 90, an apertured end head 98 is provided, which has a downwardly extending tube or extension 91, in the lower end of which a foot valve 98 is arranged. This tube or extension 91 may extend downwardly below the discharge valve 81 to such extent as may be warranted by the pressure acting on the liquid in the well, as described in connection with the inner tube 35 in Figs. 1 and 3 to 6. The aperture in the lower head 96 and the extension 91 communicates with the interior of an inner tubular member or piston rod 99, the upper end of which has the pumping piston I secured thereto. This piston I00 may have packing of any suitable kind to form a relatively water-tight and slidable connection with the pumping cylinder 86, such for example as a pair of cups IOI of leather or other suitable material. The lower end of the outer tubular member 90 is preferably also provided with apertures I02 for venting this portion of the outer tube 90.

In this construction, the pressure of the fluid from the pipe or duct 84 passing through the apertures 88 causes the outer tubular member 90 to rise. This in turn causes the pumping piston I00 to move upwardly in its stationary cylinder 86. Since the area on the under face of the head 9I upon which the fluid pressure acts is materially greater than the area of the pumping piston I00, the greater pressure of the fluid within the pumping cylinder 86 will cause the valve 8! to rise from its seat, and thus permit fluid to flow into the lower end of the pipe or duct 84 and out through the apertures 88 to-- gether with fluid under pressure descending through the pipe or duct 84. When the outer tube 90 and the parts connected therewith have reached the upper end of their stroke, which may be determined by the amount of fluid under pressure discharged by the piston II above the ground, the outer tube 90 and the parts connected therewith are moved downwardly, so that the head 9I of the outer cylinder 90 moves toward the stationary head 85 of the pumping piston. This causes liquid to flow through the apertures 88 and upwardly in the pipe or duct 84. This downward movement of the outer tube 90 may be accomplished in any suitable or desired manner, for example, by means of springs as illustrated in Figs. 1 to 6 inclusive. I have, however, illustrated in this construction the manner in which the force of gravity may be employed for returning the outer tube 90. For this purpose, I have provided a tube I05 which extends about the pipe or duct 84 and the lower end of which is secured to the upper head 9| of the cylinder 90. The space between the tube I05 and the pipe or duct 84 may be filled with any suitable material for supplying the necessary weight to return the outer tubular member 90 and parts connected therewith to their lower position. For example, if desired, the pipe I05 may be filled with the liquid which is being pumped. During the downward movement of the tube 90 and the pumping piston I00, fluid is drawn into the pumping cylinder past the foot valve 98. The tube or extension 91 in which the foot valve is arranged reciprocates up and down in the liquid in the well, during the operation of this pumping mechanism. This construction has the advantage that the weight of the liquid contained in this tube or extension supplements the weight within the tube I05 and thus helps to move the pumping piston through its suction stroke.

In the particular construction illustrated in Fig. 8, H0 represents a fluid discharge pipe or duct, which corresponds to the pipe or duct 24 shown in Fig. l. The lower end of this pipe or duct is secured to an outer tubular member II I which constitutes in effect an extension and enlargement of said pipe or duct. The connection between the pipe III) and its extension III may, for example, comprise a flanged member II2 secured to a venting head or disk II4 which in turn is secured to the upper end of the tube III. This venting head or disk is provided with a plurality of upright holes or passages II5 through which fluid from the pipe or duct IIO may pass into the interior of its tubular extension III. In this construction, a pair of power pistons is employed, each of which operates a pumping piston and Ill represents the upper power piston and H8 the lower power piston. The upper power piston II! is arranged in an outer tubular member or cylinder I20 suitably secured on the venting head H4 and any suitable form of packing, such for example as cups I2I of leather or the like may be employed between the piston III and its cylinder I20. The yielding means for effecting the return stroke of the piston in this case comprises a spring I22 interposed between the venting head H4 and the upper face of the power piston III. In order to prevent liquid from being trapped in the upper portion of the cylinder I20, suitable apertures or vents I24 are provided in the venting head 4, the outer ends of the apertures communicating with the exterior of the pumping mechanism. These vents make it possible for any gas pressure in the well to supplement the action of the spring I22.

I25 represents a pumping piston which is of smaller diameter than the power piston Ill and is connected therewith in any suitable manner, for example; by means of a piston rod I26. The pumping piston I25 reciprocates in an intermediate tubular member or cylinder I21 which may be secured to the power cylinder I20 in any suitable manner, for example, in the construction shown, the pumping cylinder is formed in one piece with the power cylinder or outer member I20, but is of reduced diameter. Openings I28 are provided either in the power cylinder I20 or the pumping cylinder I21, or as shown, preferably, in the tapering part connecting these two cylinders. Consequently, fluid pressure may pass through the apertures. I28 and act upon the opposed faces of the power and pumping pistons II! and I25. Since the piston III has a materially greater area than the pumping piston I 25, the pressure of the fluid will force the two pistons upwardly, thus compressing the spring I22 and moving the pumping piston through its suction or intake stroke.

The lower power piston I I8 may be similar in construction to the upper power piston II'I but is connected to an upper pumping piston I30 by means of an inner tubular member I3I which also forms a connecting rod. The lower power piston II8 reciprocates in an outer tubular member or power'cylidner I32, and I33 represents an intermediate tubular member or lower pumping cylinder, the two cylinders as shown being connected by means of a tapering portion provided with apertures I34. A head or inwardly extending part I35 is provided at the lower end of the power cylinder I32 and a spring I3! is interposed between this head and the lower power piston II8. The head is provided with an aperture I38 through which fluid may enter into the lower end of the power cylinder I32 and through which it may be discharged therefrom. The lower power piston II8 also has a suction or intake tube I40 secured thereto, which tube may be an extension of the tubular piston rod I3I and which extends through the aperture I33 in the head I35. The lower end of this tube I40 is provided with a foot valve I M. This intake tube I 40 may be of any desired length depending upon the pressure in the well acting on the surface liquid which is to be pumped. The opening I38 in the lower head I admits fluid pressure existing in the well to supplement the action of the spring I31.

Between the two pumping cylinders I27 and I33 is arranged a discharge valve housing I44, that shown being of substantially cylindrical form and secured to the adjacent ends of the pumping cylinders I2! and I33. A portion I45 of this valve housing extends inwardly and is apertured and supports a discharge valve I46, that shown having a stem I41 by means of which the valve is normally urged into a seating position by means of a spring I48. A discharge valve of any other suitable or desired form may, however, be provided.

When the liquid within the pipe H0 and its extension or enlargement III is under pressure, the lower pistons will operate in the same manner as described in connection with the upper pistons, except that the lower pistons will move downwardly while the upper pistons move upwardly. This constitutes the suction stroke of the pump during which fluid is admitted into the intake pipe I by unseating the foot valve I4I. When the pressure of the pumped liquid in. the pipe or duct I I0 is reduced, the springs I22 and I3! move the pistons toward each other, thus forcing liquid past the discharge valve I46 into the outer tube or housing III from which it may pass through the apertures II5 into the fluid discharge pipe or duct IIO.

. By providing a tubular member with a foot valve which is arranged to move up and down in the liquid to be pumped, there is less tendency of clogging of the parts through which the liquid flows to the foot valve, since any particles which might tend to clog the intake openings of the suction tube are very apt to be dislodged by this reciprocatory motion. Furthermore, this motion may be successfully used to keep the openings in the well casing clear. I have shown in Fig. 4, an annular brush I50 arranged adjacent to the lower end of the reciprocatory intake pipe 35, the bristles of the brush extendin! outwardly so as to brush the perforated portion of the well casing 25. It is also possible in cases where a screen is provided at the lower end of the suction pipe, such for example as the screen I52 secured to the lower end of the suction pipe 35 in Fig. 4, to provide an annular brush I53 secured to the inner surface of the well casing and having its bristles extending inwardly to brush the screen I52. Obviously, other means may be employed for utilizing the reciprocatory motion of the suction or intake tube of my improved pumping apparatus to keep the passages through which water flows through the intake tube clear of obstructions. While I have shown the brushes applied to my pumping mechanism only in Fig. 4, it will be obvious that similar brushes may be used in connection with the constructions shown in Figs. 7 and 8.

All of the constructions described have the advantage that only a single tube or duct is required for the double purpose of discharging pumped liquid and for transmitting the pressure pulsations or impulses to the pumping mechanism. It will also be noted that in these constructions, the pistons as well as the cylinders are all made of tubing and the pumping mechanisms may be designed so that this tubing is of standard sizes which are readily available, and the pistons are made of collars, rings and the like which hold the packing in place, and which are easily secured to the tubing, for example, by means of screw threads shown in all of the constructions illustrated.

Another advantage of these constructions is that the tubular parts of the pistons serve the dual function of conducting fluid which is being pumped and also of acting as connecting rods between the power and pumping pistons.

While I have shown in the various suction tubes only a single valve near the lower end thereof, yet it will be obvious that these foot valves need not be located in the lower ends thereof, but may be located anywhere lengthwise of the suction pipes. Also it is obvious that a plurality of valves may be used in the suction tube at different elevations therein.

I claim as my invention:

1. A pumping mechanism adapted to be actuated by alternating high and low pressures of the pumped liquid and including three tubular members r anged one within another, the tubular r largest diameter forming a power cyl nder the tubular member of intermediate diameter farming a pumping cylinder, the tubular lest diameter extending into both of said cylinders and having an annular portion of larger diameter formed thereon to cooperate wi h. said power cylinder and an annular portion 2r diameter forming a piston for said 7 cylinder, said tubular members being provided with means for conducting pumped liquid into contact with the upper face of the larger piston and the under face of the pumping piston, said pistons including packing cups arranged with the expansible edges of the packing cup of the pumping cylinder facing the expansible edge of the cup of the power piston, whereby pumped liquid during a high pressure interval causes the power piston to move through a downward stroke and tightens the cups of both pistons, yielding means acting on the lower face of said power piston for moving the same through its upward stroke when the pressure of the pumped liquid is reduced, means for permitting well pressure to enter said pumping mechanism to act on the lower face of said power piston to cooperate with said yielding means, a foot check valve for admitting liquid into the lower end of said tubular member of smallest diameter, and a check valve in said mechanism above said tubular member of smallest diameter past which liquid may flow from said pumping cylinder.

2. A pumping mechanism for deep wells including a power mechanism for producing reciprocating motion, a pumping mechanism including a cylinder and a tubular pumping piston operating in said cylinder and actuated by said power mechanism, said pumping cylinder being located in a well at an elevation above the liquid level therein slightly less than that to which a column of liquid to be pumped can be raised by suction due to pressure existing in said well, said piston including a tubular part connected with and movable with said pumping piston and having an open end extending directly into the liquid in the well and reciprocating in the liquid to be pumped and lifting the liquid contained therein during upward movement, a perforate well casing having openings through which the liquid passes, and a brush secured to the lower portion of said reciprocatory part for maintaining said openings clear from obstructions.

3. A pumping mechanism for deep wells including a power mechanism for producing reciprocatory motion, a pumping mechanism including a cylinder and a tubular pumping piston actuated by said power mechanism and arranged in said pumping cylinder, said pumping cylinder being located in a well at an elevation above the liquid level therein slightly less than that to which a column of liquid to be pumped can be raised by suction due to pressure existing in said well, a tubular member connected with and movable with said pumping piston and having an open end extending directly into the liquid in the well, said tubular member and piston during their upward movement elevating the liquid contained therein, a perforated well casing, and brushing means actuated by the reciprocatory movement of said last mentioned tubular memher to cooperate with perforations in said casing for providing free access of liquid to be pumped to said last mentioned tubular member.

JOSEPH S. PARENTI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2551516 *Apr 21, 1948May 1, 1951Watson John ClarkRodless pump
US2807216 *Apr 19, 1954Sep 24, 1957Exxon Research Engineering CoOil well pump
US2884860 *Nov 23, 1956May 5, 1959Black Sivalls & Bryson IncApparatus for circulating a liquid in a fluid pressure system
US2938466 *Oct 6, 1958May 31, 1960Joseph B KingPump
US3476145 *Dec 4, 1967Nov 4, 1969Ford Motor CoFuel pump system
US3804557 *May 26, 1972Apr 16, 1974Bentley ASurface operated single tube pump
US3807894 *Dec 7, 1972Apr 30, 1974Trw IncStorm choke apparatus for submergible pumps
US4390326 *Dec 29, 1980Jun 28, 1983Callicoatte Jerry DDownhole pump having a power piston and a production piston
US4492536 *Jul 15, 1983Jan 8, 1985Gilbertson Thomas AHydraulic oil well pumping unit
US5353870 *May 28, 1993Oct 11, 1994Harris Richard KWell purging and sampling pump
US5509475 *Apr 13, 1995Apr 23, 1996Lewis; Gary W.Downhole stress absorber
WO1996002731A1 *Jul 20, 1994Feb 1, 1996Richard K HarrisWell purging and sampling pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/105, 417/245, 166/171, 417/400, 417/552, 417/402, 417/339, 166/68.5, 417/488
International ClassificationF04B53/10, F04B5/00, F04B9/00, F04B47/08, F04B19/00, F04B53/12, F04B9/107, F04B3/00, F04B47/00, F04B19/02
Cooperative ClassificationF04B53/129, F04B5/00, F04B9/107, F04B19/022, F04B53/126, F04B47/08, F04B3/00
European ClassificationF04B5/00, F04B47/08, F04B3/00, F04B9/107, F04B53/12R2, F04B19/02H, F04B53/12R6