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Publication numberUS2287805 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1942
Filing dateNov 13, 1941
Priority dateNov 13, 1941
Publication numberUS 2287805 A, US 2287805A, US-A-2287805, US2287805 A, US2287805A
InventorsJohnson William B
Original AssigneeJohnson William B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rifle rack
US 2287805 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 30, 1942.

W. B. JOHNSON RIFLE RACK Filed NOV. 15, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jun 30, 1942. w. B. JOHNSON RIFLE RACK Filed Nov. 13, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 1 5 II in! Wd/ 8 fVENTOR. 9

Patented June 3t), 1942 UNITED STATES FHCE RIFLE RACK William B. Johnson, United States Army Application N overnher 13, 1941, Serial No. 413,884

(Granted under the act of March 3, 1883, as amended April 30, 1928; 370 0. G. 757) 9 Claims.

The invention described herein, if patented, may be manufactured and used by or iorthe Government for governmental purposes without i-hepayment of any royalty thereon.

The present invention relates to gun racks and more specifically to a military type rifl rack constructed and arranged to support any one of the several types of military rifles adopted as standard in the United States Army.

It will be appreciated that inasmuch as there are several military rifles used by the Army at the present time, namely, the 'Enfield, Springfield, Garand, and Browning, it is essential that in order to be of value for military purposes any type rifle rack proposed for standardization 5 should be capable of interchangeably supporting any one of the arms heretofore mentioned without the necessity of any typeof adjustment.

It will also be appreciated that inasmuch as the rifle racks with which the present invention are concerned are primarily intended to be mounted in military vehicles used at the scene of military combat, it is of utmost importance that the racks be so designed'as to permit instant availability of the arm. It will be further'appre ciated that since racks of the character with which this invention is concerned are not limited to stationary installations but are intended for use in military vehicles which may be called upon to travel at high speeds over rough terrain, it is essential that positive means be provided for securing the firearm in the rack to prevent accidental displacement'due to the jolting or jarring of the Vehicle in its movement over rough ground. It is also considered essential, however, to provide means whereby the rifle may be instantly released from the rack without the operation of any complicated type of retainers, since itmay often be necessary for the soldier to avail'himself of the rifle in totaldarkness, where any necessity of operation of complicated types of the retaining devices might prevent instantaneous availability of the arm.

It is, therefore, the principal object of this invention to provide a new and improved military rifle rack composed of a single, unitary sheet metal channel bent to conform with the general shape of the standard military rifle and to provide a pocket to receive the stock of the rifle and a muzzle socket to receive the rifle muzzle.

A further object of the invention is to provide. av muzzle socket. for a rifle rack including a takeup or compensating spring in order that the muzzle socket may adapt itself to different sizes and shapes of rifle muzzles without the necessity of any manual adjustment.

A further object of the invention is to provide a rifle rack including a. muzzle socket and a retaining clip including a spring release which will maintain the rifle muzzle in'position against all normal forces incident to vehicle movement, but will be yieldable to positive force whenever a soldier grasps the rifle firmly to withdraw it from the rack.

Another object of the invention is to provide a rifle rack wherein all surfaces normally contacting the rifle are padded with resilient material, in order to prevent damage to the arm and to reduce vibration.

A further object of the invention'is to provide a rifle rack including a unitary metal channel arranged to substantially surround all of the working parts of the rifle, to exclude dirt therefrom and prevent accidental damage thereto.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel and simplified rifle retaining clip to maintain the rifle in the rack.

These and other important objects are accomplished. in the present invention, the preferred embodiment of which is illustrated in, the drawings, wherein Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a present preferred form of rifle rack, constructedin accordance with the teachings of this disclosure.

Fig. 2 is a central sectional view thereof.

Fig. 3 is a front elevational view, and

Fig. 4 is a fragmental detail side elevational view of the improved retaining latch.

The rifle rack disclosed in the drawings comprises in general a unitary metal frame including a vertical mounting portion l9 having a muzzle socket II at its upper end and a stock socket I? at its'lower end. The entire frame structure is preferably formed of relatively thin sheet metal having a flat rear surface by which it may be attached to a wall as, for example, the wall. of a vehicle body, by means of a plurality ofscrews It. The arrangement is also provided whereby the stock socket l2 may be secured to the floor of a vehicle, as, for example, by the screw it, which extends through a suitable perforation in the metallic end portion l5 of the stock socket. The vertical portion of the frame is provided with a pair of relatively narrow side flanges 16 which are flared outwardly at the point H to give clearance for the bolt mechanism of a military rifle. The lower ends of each of the flanges it are widened andare extended angular-lyoutwardly to provide relatively wide stock guards [8 of generally triangular shape arranged to closely encircle both sides of the rifle stock and prevent any accidental shifting or unnecessary vibration of the rifle in its rack. The guards I8 do not meet at the front of the rack, however, but are spaced apart by the slot which will prevent foreign substances such as dust, dirt or Water from accumulating in the stock pocket.

The stock pocket I2 is also provided with a cushion IQ of sponge rubber or some other similar resilient material, on which the weight of the rifle will rest. A resilient rubber button 22 is mounted on the angular lower extension 2| of the vertical mounting portion ID to bear against the upper surface of the rifle stock and assist in preventing unnecessary vibration, as well as preventing any possibility of the rear sights or other delicate mechanism from striking the rear surface of the rifle rack.

The upper ends of the side flanges I6 are also widened to provide relative long side webs or protective flanges 23 on each side of the upper portion of the rifle barrel. The extreme upper end of the frame is inclined outwardly at the point 24 and is provided with a resilient cushion 25 which may be preferably formed of sponge rubber, to support the upper portion of the rifle.

The entire forward edge of the rack is protected by a strip or bead 26 of resilient padding to prevent any possibility of scratching or otherwise damaging the rifle when it is being inserted into the rack or withdrawn therefrom.

In order to maintain th rifle in fixed position in the rack suitable retaining mechanism must be associated with the rack, and in the present embodiment of this invention the preferred form of retainer includes a cross-bolt 3| having a padded straight portion 32 arranged to extend between the flanges 23 and to bear against the outer surface of the rifle. The bolt 3| is pivotally mounted on a straight portion 33 pivoted in the bearings 34 and 35, respectively, of a mounting bracket 36, and provided with a coiled compression spring 31 to urge the straight portion 33 inwardly so that the padded cross-bolt 32 will be held in spring-urged frictional engagement with the outer surface of the rifle.

It is to be particularl noted that the straight portion 33 is inclined downwardly so that the bolt 32 is moved into engagement against the forward surface of the rifle as it assumes its transverse position. With this arrangement of parts, no latches or other similar devices are required to secure the rifle, since the frictional engagement of the padded portion 32 with the rifle itself will prevent the bolt from swinging downwardly to released position.

The operation of the device is as follows:

A soldier will place the stock of the rifle in the stock pocket [2 and the upper portion of the rifle in the muzzle socket II and then swing the bolt 32 upwardly about its pivot and into the trans verse position illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawings. As this action takes place, the pad 32 will bear against the surface of the rifle with suflicient friction to retain the bolt in position. The spring 31 will be compressed to a greater or less degree, depending upon the exact dimensions of the rifle barrel. This compensating spring 31 allows the rifle rack to be interchangeably used with any one of the rifles adopted as standard in the United States Army, since the permissible variation in the position of the bolt will adequately compensate for the small differences in dimensions of the various rifles now in use.

To remove the firearms from the rack it is only necessary to strike the outer knob 35 of the bolt 32 downwardly to swing it into the position illustrated in Fig. 3, and then withdraw the arm as illustrated in Fig. 1. In an emergency, the arm may be withdrawn by simply grasping th upper extremity of the barrel and jerking it sharply forward against the bolt 32. Under these circumstances the compression spring 31 will yield and the inclined position of the pivotal mounting is such that the force exerted against the bolt will cause it to overcome the friction with the outer surface of the rifle barrel and to snap downwardly, thus releasing the rifle instantaneously.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that by practicing the teachings of the present invention it is possible to provide a highly satisfactory rifle rack of extremely simple construction capable of entirely satisfactory operation even under the most adverse circumstances of use. It will be noted, of course, that the entire structure may be of conventional pressed steel construction and the retaining structures include only a very few comparatively simple parts. In military operations, the type of rack here disclosed is particularly desirable, since it has no delicate parts whatsoever and can be subjected to great abuse without damage. In this connection it will be noted that the entire rifle body and particularly the sight and bolt structure are quite well protected against accidental damage, since they lie between the flanges I6 and closely adjacent the wall. This, of course, means that the rifle is not apt to be damaged, since the force of any accidental impact will be apt to be received by some portion of the rack. It will also be appreciated that the rack is almost instantaneous in operation, since the retainer by which the arm is secured will automatically release responsive to a sharp outward jerk on the muzzle of the gun.

I have shown and described the present invention in the preferred form as developed for mili tary purposes and adopted by the United States Army. I am, however, aware that it is subject to numerous alterations and modifications without departing from the spirit of the invention and I therefore do not wish to be limited except as by the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what is claimed as new and desired to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. In a rifle rack, a flat, longitudinal mounting portion including integral side flanges projecting outwardly therefrom, said side flanges including a flared portion adapted to provide clearance for the bolt mechanism of a rifle; an angularly-inclined lower extension on said flat portion formed integrally therewith and extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom, a pair of triangular stock guards of generally triangular configuration and of progressively greater width toward the end of the rack structure extending outwardly from said extension, said guards being arranged to cooperate with the extension to form a relatively deep stock pocket adapted to substantially enclose the stock of a rifle, the arrangement being such that said guards are spaced apart at their forward edges to provide a slot in said stock pocket; a pair of relatively long protective flanges adjacent the upper end of the rifle rack and formed integrally with the aforementioned straight mounting portion and the side flanges thereof to define a muzzle socket for the rifle, the entire structure comprising a single integral pressed steel frame; a resilient bead portion affixed to the edges of said steel frame and extending completely around both sides of the rifle rack to pad and protect all of the free edges of the metal; a resilient sponge rubber pad positioned in the stock socket and adapted to bear against the base of the stock; a resilient pad in the socket adapted to bear against the top of the stock; a resilient pad in the muzzle socket and adapted to bear against the barrel portion of the rifle and a retainer structure comprising an L-shaped cross-bolt having a padded straight portion adapted to project across the muzzle socket of the rifle bracket and frictionally engage the lower portion of the rifle barrel, the cross-bolt including a pivot portion arranged at a right angle to the cross-bolt portion and pivotally mounted on the muzzle socket, spring means arranged to permit limited longitudinal shifting of the straight pivot portion whereby the cross-bolt may assume different positions corresponding to the difierences of dimensions of various rifles, said pivot portion of the crossbolt being mounted in an angular relationship to the axis of the rifle barrel and to the direction of movement 0! the rifle for release from the socket, whereby the frictional engagement between the padded portion of'the bolt and the rifle barrel will normally maintain the retaining cross-bolt in position, the construction and arrangement being such that the straight padded portion of the cross-bolt Will snap downwardly into released position responsive to a sharp 0ut- 5 ward force applied to the upper end of the rifle barrel,

2. In a rifle rack, a flat, longitudinal mounting portion including integral side flanges projecting outwardly therefrom, said side flanges including a flared portion adapted to provide clearance for the bolt mechanism of a rifle; an angularly-inclined lower extension on said flat portion formed integrally therewith and extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom, a pair of triangular stock guards of generally triangular configuration and of progressively greater width toward the end of the rack structure extending outwardly from said extension, said guards being arranged to cooperate with the extension to form a relatively deep stock pocket adapted to substantially enclose the stock of a rifle, the arrangement being such that said guards are spaced apart at their forward edges to provide a slot in said stock pocket; a pair of relatively long protective flanges s adjacent the upper end of the rifle rack and formed integrally with the aforementioned a straight mounting portion and the side flanges thereof to define a muzzle socket for the rifle, the entire structure comprising a single integral pressed steel frame; a resilient bead portion affixed to the edges of said steel frame and extending completely around both sides of the rifle rack to pad and protect all of the free edges of the metal; a resilient sponge rubber pad positioned in the stock socket and adapted to bear against the base of the stock; a resilient pad in the socket adapted to bear against the top of the stock; a resilient pad in the muzzle socket and adapted to bear against the barrel portion of the rifle; and retaining means connected with said muzzle socket to prevent displacement of the rifle therefrom.

3. In a rifle rack, a flat, longitudinal mounting portion including integral side flanges projecting 3 outwardly therefrom, said side flanges including a 'flared portion adapted to provide clearance for the bolt mechanism of a rifle; an angularlyinclined lower extension on said flat portion formed integrally therewith and extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom, a pair of triangular stock guards of generally triangular con figuration and of progressively greater width toward the end of the rack structure extending outwardly from said extension, said guards being arranged to cooperate with the extension to form a relatively deep stock pocket adapted to substantially enclose the stock of a rifle; a pair of relatively long protective flanges adjacent the upper end of the rifle rack and formed integrally with the aforementioned straight mounting portion and the side flanges thereof, to define a muzzle socket for the rifle, the entire structure comprising a single integral pressed steel frame; a resilient bead portion aflixed to the edges of said steel frame and extending completely around both sides of the rifle rack to pad and protect all of the free edges of the metal; a resilient sponge rubber pad positioned in the stock socket and adapted to bear against the base of the stock; a resilient pad within the stock pocket and adapted to bear against the upper surface of the stock; a resilient pad in the muzzle socket and adapted to bear against the barrel portion of the rifle, and retaining means connected with said muzzle socket to prevent displacement of the rifle therefrom.

4. In a rifle rack, a flat, longitudinal mounting portion, including integral side flanges projecting outwardly therefrom, said side flanges including a flared portion adapted to provide clearance for the bolt mechanism of a rifle; an angularly-inclined lower extension on said flat portion formed integrally therewith and extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom, a pair of triangular stock guards of generally triangular configuration and of progressively greater width toward the end of the rack structure extending outwardly from said extension, said guards being arranged to cooperate with the extension to form a relatively deep stock pocket adapted to substantially enclose the stock of a rifle; a pair of relatively long protective flanges adjacent the upper end of the rifle rack and formed integrally with the aforementioned straight mounting portion and the side flanges thereof, to define a muzzle socket for the rifle, the entire structure comprising a single integral pressed steel frame; a resilient sponge rubber pad positioned in the stock socket and adapted to bear against the base of the stock; a resilient pad adapted to bear against the upper surface of the stock; a

resilient pad in the muzzle socket and adapted to bear against the barrel portion of the rifle, and retaining means connected with said muzzle socket to prevent displacement of the rifle therefrom.

5. In a rifle rack, a flat, longitudinal mounting portion including integral side flanges projecting outwardly therefrom, said said flanges including a flared portion adapted to provide clearance for the bolt mechanism of a rifle; an angularly-inclined lower extension on said flat portion formed integrally therewith and extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom, a pair of triangular stock guards of generally triangular configuration and of progressively greater width toward the end of the rack structure extending outwardly from said extension, said guards being arranged to cooperate with the extension to form a relatively deep stock pocket adapted to substantially enclose the stock of a rifle; a pair of relatively long protective flanges adjacent the upper end of the rifle and formed integrally with the aforementioned straight mounting portion and the side flanges thereof, to define a muzzle socket for the rifle, the entire structure comprising a single integral pressed steel frame; resilient pads adapted to bear against the rifle, and retaining means connected with said muzzle socket to prevent displacement of the rifle therefrom.

6. In combination with a vertical rifle mounting bracket having a muzzle socket open at the top and the front, a retainer structure comprising an L-shaped cross-bolt having a padded straight portion adapted to project across the front opening of the muzzle socket of the rifle bracket and frictionally engage the rifle, the cross-bolt including a pivot portion arranged at a right angle to the cross-bolt portion and pivotally mounted on the muzzle socket, resilient means to permit limited longitudinal shifting of the straight pivot portion whereby the cross-bolt may assume different positions corresponding to the differences of dimensions of various rifles, said pivot portion of the cross-bolt being mounted in an angular relationship to the axis of the rifle barrel and to the direction of movement of the rifle for release from the socket, whereby the frictional engagement between the padded bolt and the rifle barrel will normally maintain the retaining crossbolt in position, the construction and arrangement being such that the straight padded portion of the cross-bolt will snap downwardly into released position responsive to a sharp outward force applied to the upper end of the rifle barrel.

'7. In combination with a rifle mounting bracket having a muzzle socket open at the top and the front, a retainer structure comprising an L-shaped cross bolt having a straight portion adapted to project across the front opening of the muzzle socket of the rifle bracket and frictionally engage the lower portion of the rifle barrel, the cross bolt including a pivot portion arranged at an angle to the cross bolt portion, said pivot portion of the cross bolt being mounted in angular relationship to the direction of release movement of the rifle whereby the frictional engagement between the bolt and the rifle will normally maintain the retaining cross bolt in position, the construction and arrangement being such that the straight portion of the cross bolt will snap into release position responsive to a sharp outward force applied to the rifle.

8. In combination with a vertical rifle mounting bracket having a muzzle socket open at the top and the front, a retainer structure comprising an L-shaped cross-bolt having a straight portion adapted to project across the front opening of the socket of the rifle bracket and frictionally engage the rifle, the cross-bolt including a pivot portion arranged at an angle to the cross-bolt portion, said pivot portion of the cross-bolt being mounted in an angular relationship to the direction of movement of the rifle for release from the socket, whereby the frictional engagement between the bolt and the rifle barrel will normally maintain the retaining cross-bolt in position, the construction and arrangement being such that the straight portion of the cross-bolt will snap into released position responsive to a sharp outward force applied to the rifle.

9. In a retainer structure, an L-shaped crossbolt having a straight portion adapted to project across a vertical socket and having a front .opening and frictionally engage an instrument within said socket, the cross-bolt including a pivot portion arranged at a right angle to the cross-bolt portion, said pivot portion of the cross-bolt being mounted in an angular relationship to the direction of movement of the instrument for release from the socket, whereby the frictional engagement between the bolt and the instrument will normally maintain the retaining cross-bolt in position, the construction and arrangement being such that the straight portion of the cross-bolt will snap into released position responsive to a sharp outward force applied to the instrument.

WILLIAM B. JOHNSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2542667 *Dec 12, 1947Feb 20, 1951Hanson Robert CGun-carrying case
US2588467 *Apr 12, 1949Mar 11, 1952Ernest L BarneyGun carrier
US3219299 *Jan 7, 1964Nov 23, 1965Edward Snlder PaulBow-stand
US3917071 *Jan 23, 1974Nov 4, 1975Bmr Security Prod CorpWeapon security rack
US4018339 *Jun 11, 1976Apr 19, 1977Pritz Peter GAnti-theft gun protector apparatus
US4579263 *Aug 9, 1984Apr 1, 1986City Of MilwaukeeGun rack
US4662805 *Nov 1, 1985May 5, 1987Carlos TamezLocking load bar carrier and method
US4922642 *Jul 3, 1989May 8, 1990Ohlhauser Bradley DLong gun muzzle tether and protector
US6863187 *Aug 11, 2003Mar 8, 2005Phil A. RobertsonGun support apparatus
US20060113341 *Jan 16, 2006Jun 1, 2006Murray Kurt RGun mount apparatus
EP0036478A2 *Feb 3, 1981Sep 30, 1981Walter DräbingRifle rack for hunting car
EP0036478A3 *Feb 3, 1981Apr 21, 1982Walter DrabingRifle rack for hunting car
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/64
International ClassificationA47B81/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B81/005
European ClassificationA47B81/00D