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Publication numberUS2288966 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1942
Filing dateDec 5, 1940
Priority dateDec 5, 1940
Publication numberUS 2288966 A, US 2288966A, US-A-2288966, US2288966 A, US2288966A
InventorsJoseph E A Blanchet
Original AssigneeSonoco Products Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Core for yarn or thread packages and method of making the same
US 2288966 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 7, J. E. AMBLANCHET 2,288,966

CORE FOR YARN OR THREAD PACKAGES AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed Dec. 5, 1940 Patented July 7, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE cons FOR rum on mean rilclmolus AND nm'rnon or MAKING 'rnn sum Joseph E. A. Blanchet, Mystic, Conn., assignor to Sonooo Products Company, H'artsville, S. C., a corporation of South Carolina Application December 5,1940, Serial No. seam "larly cotton yarn, is to operate his spindles at higher and higher speeds in the attempt to accelerate the rate of production. To perform satisfactorily at high speeds, a spindle driven bobbin must be perfectly balanced or the spindle upon which the bobbin is mounted will' rapidly become excessively worn. Bobbins fabricated of wood, when driven at speeds greater than a determined safe speedwear due to the fact that the wood is non-uniform 'in density around the circumference of the bobbin, thus causing thecenter of gravity of the bobbin to be to one side of its geometric axis. At a spindle speed of 14,000 revolutions per minute, for instance, at which speeds, or even higher speeds, it is now desirable to rotate yarn cores or bobbins in. spinning, a very slight eccentricity of the center of gravity of the bobbin will cause materially increased spindle wear. This is quite independent of the material of which the bobbin is fabricated, of course, and the undesirable spindle wear will occur when bobbins which are fabricated of materials other than wood are in use, if eccentricity of the centers of gravity exists.

It is a matter of primary importance, therefore, to utilize yarn or thread cores which are perfectly balanced about their central longitudinal axes and it is a primary object of the present invention to provide such a core or bobbin, one which may be revolved by the spindle upon which it is mounted at any speed within reason with whereby the core or bobbin may be both supported upon the spindle and frictionally driven thereby. By preference the tube is wound convolutely and is of uniform section from end to end rather than of tapering character and the sleeve-like portion within the body of the tube is provided with a spindle engaging frusto-conical surface which makes an angle with the axis of the tube, the core receiving surface of the spindle being correspondingly tapered.

I have devised a paper tube which is entirely suitable, when used as a core to support thread or yarn, particularly cotton thread or yarn, in a spinning operation, for use at high spinning out exerting on the spindle any appreciable radial so controlled as to produce a uniformly balanced tube. The tube thus formed is further acted upon, in such manner as not to destroy its balance, to provide an interior tapered sleeve with a frusto-conical bearing surface adapted to This object I aciii engage a similarly formed surface of the spindle,

speeds, being perfectly balanced so as not to develop a radial thrust upon-the spindle upon p which it is supported when rotating at high speed. The one-piece core has a frusto-conical surface to be placed over and to closely engage a similar surface of identical taper on the upper I end of the rotatable spindle of a spinning machine, the spindle engaging frusto-conical surface being the inside surface of an inner sleeve- -like portion of the tube which is connected to the outer or thread receiving portion by a web which isintegral with both the outer tube and the inner sleeve. I

Due to the fact that the spindle engaging sleeve is in reality an integral part of the tube, there can be no separation of this sleeve from the tube. A strong force tending to twist the spindle engaging portion of the tube and to separate it from the thread receiving and supporting portion will occur when the core or bobbin, or the thread package wound upon it,

are suddenly stopped by the hand-of the spinner, the driving effort of the prime mover continued and the belt which drives the spindle being forced to slip upon the driving or driven pulley.

Where, as here, the connection between the tube proper and the inner sleeve comprises a web which is integral with both tube and sleeve, the possibility that the sleeve may be broken away from the tube by torque so applied is eliminated. I also, in order to make the tube as durable as possible and well able to withstand the rough handling to which it is subjected in actual use, form a reinforcing bead or rib at the end thereof which is remote from that at which the spindle engaging sleeve is located, a short length of the tube being inturned and. after being inturned, preferably expanded slightlyso as to make the inner diameter of the tube at the bead approximately equal to the inner diameter of the tube at all other points save only at the Also, either before or after the completion of the core by deforming its ends in the stated manner, I preferably impregnate the same with a hardening solution which tends to stiffen the tube without rendering it brittle. Any suitable hardening solution may be employed for this purpose. Care is taken in inturning the ends of the tube to eliminate the possibility of breakage of the fibers of the paper, at least to any material ex result in weakening of the tent, which might tube at any point.

A novel method of and means for inturning the end of the tube will be hereinafterdescribed, together with other instrumentalities employed in the shaping of the inturned portion of the tube into frusto-co'nical form. It will be appreciated by one skilled in the art that, within the import of the invention, minor changes may be made in the instrumentalities employed in the fabrication of the tube, in the method followed, and in the tube itself. -..hat which has been selected for illustration by way of example, however, will be found to be eminently satisfactory in actual use.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 shows in axial section a convolutely wound paper tube, commonly known in the art as a parallel tube since it is of uniform diameter from end to end;

Figure 2 illustrates rather diagrammatically the die for and the method of inturning one end of the tube in the formation of the inner spindle engaging sleeve; Figure 3 is a view showing the mechanism for acting upon the spindle engaging sleeve to reduce this sleeve to tapered form, the parts adapted to act upon the sleeve being shown in the positions which they occupy just before the tapering operation is performed;

Figure 4 is a similar view but showing the operating parts of the sleeve tapering mechanism in the positions which they occupy at the conclusion of the taper forming operation;

Figure 5 shows the completed tube, partially in side elevation and partially in section, the lower end of the tube being shown to have an integral ning frame, which spindle is shown in elevation:

and

Figure 7 is a view of a convolutely wound tube such as that shown in Figure l but-one end of which has been beveled for purposes hereinafter to be made clear. I

The paper employed may be as desired and the tube which is to be acted upon may be formed in any suitable way. Preferably I form the tube by winding a paper sheet upon a mandrel to form a tube several plies in thickness, such as that indicated at N in Figure l, the ends of the tube being accurately trimmed at right angles to its axis and the tube then being allowed to dry. By exercising care 1:. winding and by beveling the leading and trailinr edges of the sheet from which the tube is fabric ted, a tube which is perfectly balanced about its axis is formed.

After the adhesive employed in securing the several plies or convolutions of thetube together has dried, one end of the tube is pressed axially against a rapidly rotating die of the type indicated at H in Figure 2, this die having a sleevelike portion II the inner diameter of which is only slightly greater than the outer diameter of the tube, the inner wall of the sleeve-like portion merging with the wall of the annular groove II", which is semi-circular in all radial sections. a central cone-like mandrel portion H being provided, with the conical surface of which the curved surface of the groove H also smoothly merges. The sleeve-like portion ll' of the die I l serves as a support and guide for the tube during the inturning operation and a suflicient pressure is continuously exerted upon the outer end of the tube to cause its inner end to be inturned to the extent shown in Figure 2, the fibers of the paper of which the tube is fabricated remaining uninjured. After the inner sleeve H! has been fabricated in the manner just described, the tube is removed from the rotating die II and is inserted in a supporting member l3 which is likewise provided with a tube encircling sleeve l3 and a groove I3 for the reception of the end of ceiving surface of the spindle upon which the tube is eventually to be mounted. After the several elements have been positioned as shown in Figure 3, the mandrel I5 is advanced so that its tapering portion l5 enters the sleeve ID of the tube Hi, the mandrel being advanced until the annular shoulder Ii which is fixed thereon strikes the outer end of the tube, as indicated in Figure 4, whereupon the movement of the mandrel is terminated. Mandrel I! may be rotated, if desired, during this operation, but it is not essential that this be done.

In moving into the position shown in Figure 4, the mandrel expands the inturned sleeve Ill into the form of a frustum of a cone, the completed tube shown in Figure 5 'having a frusto-conical sleeve l0 connected to the tube III by means of a continuous web lfl which is integral with both the tube and the sleeve and constitutes a permanent connection between these two portions of the core. A bead generally indicated at l! is preferably formed upon the lower or opposite end of the tube by inturning a relatively short section of the tube at that end by the aid of a die such as shown in Figure 2, and a mandrel having a tapered end and cylindrical body of the same diameter as the inside of the tube. By inserting the mandrel into the end of the tube the inturned end portion may be pressed outwardly and the tube end also expanded, it being desired that no portion of the tube except the frusto-conical inner surface of the sleeve l0 shall contact with the spindle 20 when placed in operative position thereon, with the frusto-conical inner face of the sleeve in contact with the similarly formed surface 20 of the spindle, as indicated in Figure 6.

In certain cases it may be desired to interiorly bevel or taper, as by a grinding operation, that end of the tube which is to be inturned for the formation of the spindle engaging sleeve, as indicated at I! in Figure 7. This will facilitate inturned portion which would otherwise contact with the inner wall of the body of the tube and resist further displacement under the pressure of the forming mandrel, has been removed. After the core has been completed and resembles that shown in Figure 5, I'may or may not immerse it in a hardening solution. Employment of a hardening solution is dependent upon the degree of reinforcement required for varying usage. By the impregnation also the surfac of thecore, which is perfectly smooth at the completion of the forming operations is maintained in a smooth condition, which of course is to be desired.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is: a

l. A paper core for a yarn or thread package comprising a convolutely wound tube with inturned end portions, the inturned portion atone end of the tube having a frusto-conical surface of suflicient length, measured axially of the tube, to grip a correspondingly tapered spindle end and to adequately support the core and a thread package on such spindle, and the inturned portion at the other end comprising a reinforcing rib or bead.

2. The method of forming a paper core for a yarn or thread package which comprises forming a multi-ply paper tube by convolutely winding a paper sheet, iut-urning one end thereof by pressing the same against a rotating die which is provided with a transversely curved annular groove concentric with the axis of rotation of the die and of such diameter as to receive the end of the tube, and thereafter imparting a frusto-conical form or shape to said inturned end by thrusting a frusto-conical die axially into the same to successively expand annular sections thereof, beginning with the section at the inner end, while at the same time supporting the outer wallsurface of the tube.

3. The method of forming a paper core for a yarn or thread package which comprises forming a paper tube by convolutely winding a paper sheet, turning into the interior of the tube by means of a rotating die without breaking the fibers of the tube, a substantial portion of the end thereof, and thereafter expanding said inturned portion into frusto-conical form by means of a conical plunger inserted axially into the tube from the opposite end thereof in such manner as to circumferentially stretch all annular sections of said inturned portion.

4. A paper 0 ,e for a yarn or thread package comprising a/ ubular portion the outer surface of which is adapted to receive and support the inner windings of a thread or yarn package and a spindle-engaging sleeve portion within and adjacent one end of said tubular portion, said tubular and sleeve portions being concentric and adjacent outer ends thereof being connected by a web portion which is integral .with both, the said spindle-engaging sleeve having an inner spindle-engaging surface and being of suflicient length, measured axially of. the tube, to adequately support the core, and any thread package mounted thereon, upon the spindle, and to maintain driving engagement with the spindle during rotation thereof.

5. A paper core for a yarn or thread package comprising a cylindrical body portion the outer surface of which is adapted to receive and support the inner windings of a thread or yarn package and a spindle-engaging sleeve portion within and adjacent one end of said body portion, said body and sleeve portions being concentric and adjacent outer ends thereof being connected by a continuous web which is integral with both such portions, the said spindle-engaging, sleeve having an inner frusto-conical spindle-engaging surface and being of suflicient length, measured axially of the tube, to adequately support the core, and

, any thread package mounted thereon, upon the spindle, and to maintain driving engagement with the spindle during rotation thereof.

6. The method of forming a paper core for a yarn or thread package which comprises forming a tubular member of paper the outer surface of which is adapted to receive and support the inner windings of a thread or yarn package, intuming one end thereof to form a spindle-engaging sleeve portion of reduced diameter within and integral with the outer or thread package supporting portion, and thereafter imparting a spindle gripping frusto-conical surface to said inturned end by thrusting a frusto-conical die axially into the same from the inner end while supporting the outer wall surface of the outer portion of the tube.

JOSEPH E. A. BLANCHET.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2597960 *Oct 18, 1950May 27, 1952Celanese CorpYarn package support
US2751936 *Jan 8, 1953Jun 26, 1956Sonoco Products CoTextile carrier and means for forming same
US2803308 *Aug 11, 1955Aug 20, 1957Dictaphone CorpEar-tip for stethoscope type headset
US2953317 *Mar 15, 1955Sep 20, 1960Decorated Metal Mfg Co IncSpool
US3109590 *Mar 22, 1961Nov 5, 1963Arthur GrahamDrinking straw
US3318334 *Apr 6, 1964May 9, 1967Caterpillar Tractor CoConduit with enlarged end and method of forming same
US3568577 *Dec 12, 1967Mar 9, 1971Joseph A VossApplicators for catamenial devices
US5056733 *May 1, 1990Oct 15, 1991Sonoco Products CompanyTubular yarn carrier having improved nose construction
US5120294 *Jun 11, 1991Jun 9, 1992Sonoco Products CompanyMethod and apparatus for forming a tubular yarn carrier
US6394386 *Sep 8, 2000May 28, 2002Yueh-O LoPaper reel for yarn packages
US6719242Dec 1, 2000Apr 13, 2004Sonoco Development, Inc.Composite core
US7051767 *Dec 30, 2003May 30, 2006Judson A. Smith CompanyEnd formed tube
US7722518 *Jul 11, 2006May 25, 2010Klinsan Bcn S.L.Process for production of a bobbin tube for yarn, device for embodiment of such process, bobbin tube obtained and mode of utilisation of said bobbin tube
DE19822226A1 *May 18, 1998Dec 9, 1999Dieter GmelinVorrichtung zum Verbinden flächiger Teile
DE19822226C2 *May 18, 1998Sep 25, 2003Dieter GmelinVorrichtung zum Verbinden flächiger Teile
DE29720015U1 *Nov 12, 1997Jan 2, 1998Huelsenfabrik Ed Herbster GmbhHohlzylindrischer Hülsenkörper
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/118.31, 493/293, 242/118.32, 493/303, 239/33, 138/109, 138/170
International ClassificationB65H75/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/10, B65H2701/31
European ClassificationB65H75/10