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Publication numberUS2292239 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 4, 1942
Filing dateOct 2, 1941
Priority dateOct 2, 1941
Publication numberUS 2292239 A, US 2292239A, US-A-2292239, US2292239 A, US2292239A
InventorsHoward M Pierce, John H Hermson
Original AssigneeSpalding A G & Bros Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Calk device
US 2292239 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A118- 4, 1942- H. M. PIERCE ET Al. 2,292,239

@ALK DEVICE Filed Oct. 2, 1941 "W u 7' l Wl ATTORNEYS Patented Aug. 4, 1942 S PATENT FFICE `CALK DEVICE Howard M. Pierce and John H. Hermson, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignors to A. G. Spalding & Bros. Inc., Chicopee, Mass., a corporation of Delaware Application October 2, 1941, Serial No. 413,289

9 Claims.

The invention relates to calk devices for association with the soles of shoes, such for example as the soles of football, soccer, softball and other athletic shoes.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a calk device of the type having complemental fasteningmeans for removably securing a ground engaging element or cleat relative to the shoe sole, in which the cleat when once tightened relative to the sole is very eiectively maintained against adverse unforced loosening with respect thereto, and which may be easily manufactured. A

'Another and related object of the invention is to provide a calk'device of the screw-on removable cleat type, which may be quickly assembled with a shoe sole and which includes an especially simple but particularly effective means for maintaining the cleat element against unforced unscrewing relative to the shoe sole.

A feature of the invention, therefore, resides in the provision in a cleat assembly including attaching a cleat to a shoe sole, of a cleat-antiunscrewing means of such a, nature that a simple bushinglike locking member of distortable material may be utilized in very eectively resisting any unforced unscrewing of the cleat once the cleat is screwed into position on the shoe sole.

Another feature of the invention resides in the provision of a cleat assembly of the immediately foregoing nature in which the cleat has formed in the base thereof a recess for receiving the bushinglike locking member and in which the locking memberand the recess are so proportioned and shaped relative to each other that the locking member initially has a portion projecting outwardly from the recess and that -the locking member initially may expand laterallyv therein in at least one restricted section while being held against lateral expansion in a contiguous section.

Another featurefof the inventionresides in the provision of acleat assembly of the foregoing `screw type complementary securing meansv for Other features of the invention include the provision in a cleat assembly of the general character referred to above, of special gripping means on the sole and on the base of the cleat facing the sole for engaging with the distortable bushinglike locking member when the cleat is screwed on the shoe sole.

Other objects and features will hereinafter appear.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a sectional view illustrating one form of the present invention and showing the cleat and bushinglike locking member in a separated or exploded position relative to each other 'and to the sole.

Fig. 2 is an end view of the bushinglike locking member.

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 1, but showing the cleat assembly with the cleat fully screwed up into position and with the bushinglike locking member distorted into effective locking condition.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken on the line 4--4 of Fig. 3. Y

Fig. 5 isa view looking toward the sole with the cleat and bushinglike locking member removed.

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 3, but illustrating a modified form of the present invention.

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 1, but showing another modified form of the invention.

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 3,'but illustrating the form of the invention shown in Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a view looking toward the base of a modified cleat adapted for utilization in place of the cleat shown with the form illustrated'in Figs. 'I and 8.

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 5. but illustrating portions of the assembly initially secured to the shoe sole with` those forms of the invention shown in Figs. 7, 8 and 9.

Before describing the present improvements and mode of operation thereof in detail it should be understood thattlie invention is not limited to the details of construction and arrangement of parts shown in the accompanying drawing, which are merely illustrative of the present preferred embodimentssince the invention is capable of other embodiments, `and the phraseology employed is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

Referring now more particularly to the drawing, and rst to Figs. 1-5, there is shown for the purpose of illustrating one form of the present invention a portion of a shoe sole Il, including,

as is conventional, an inner layer I2 and an outer layer I3, and having formed therein an aperture I4 for receiving a threaded stud I5 by which a cleat I64may be removably secured to larly noted, however, that while the washer il-' lustrated in thepatent of reference does not include special gripping means projecting towards the base of the cleat, the washer I1 preferably used with the cleat assembly of the present invention includes such means in the form of the radially extending ribs 20.

As is conventional, the stud I5 includes, in addition to a threaded shank portion 2i extending downwardly from the shoe sole to threadedly receive an internally threaded insert 22 in the cleat, a head portion 23 adapted to engage the upper or inner side of the shoe sole.

As illustrated, the cleat I 6 may, as is usual,

include a main body of moldable material such 33 adapted to be aligned with the bore 25 inv the cleat for receiving the projecting shank portion 2l of the stud.

It is to be particularly noted that the recess 21 and the bushinglike locking member 29 are so shaped and so proportioned relative to each other that the locking member when initially located axially fully in the recess has a portion projecting axially outwardly from the recess, and that the locking member initially may expand laterally in the recess in certain restricted sections while being held against lateral expansion in sections contiguous thereto. s

As shown lbest in Figs. 1 and 4, this result is achieved =by forming the recess 21 with a main portion 3i having a transverse cross sectional shape conforming or substantially conforming to the initial transverse cross sectional shape of the locking member 29 which, as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, is that of a. cylinder, and with a plurality of pocket portions 32 laterally oiset from and communicating with the main .portion 3i.

With this construction, and as shown clearly in Figs. 3 and ,4,- when the cleat is screwed up on the stud I5 toward the sole, the locking member is axially pressed lbetween the washer I1 and the shoulder 33 defining the inner terminus of the recess to laterally distort circumferentially spaced sections of the locking member into the pockets 32 while sections of the locking member circumferentially adjacent thereto are conned against lateral expansion by the side walls of the main portion 3l of the recess and the walls of the locking member bore are pressed laterally inward against the threaded stud.

In this manner laterally projecting circumferentially spaced portions 34 on the locking member are provided which cooperate with the shoulders defining the side walls o f the pockets to effectively maintain the locking member against turning relative to the cleat. At the same time the end of the locking member initially projecting axially from the recess also is distorted laterally as shown in Fig. 3 to form an annular angelike portion 35 that is pressed axially between the washer on the sole and the pressing portion of the cleat base. If the cleat body itself be of somewhat distortable material, and as clearly shown in Fig. 3, the pressing portion thereof will be depressed to make room for the ilangelike -portion 35 of the locking member and thus permit a rm seating of the outer marginal portion of the base on the washer. Additionally, it is to be noted, and as also shown in Fig. 3, portions 35a of the locking member are pressed into the radial slots I8 in the washer. These latter portions 35a, together with the ribs 20 which engage the projecting end of the locking member, serve to most effectively maintain the locking member against unforced turning relative to the washer and stud.

If desired and as shown in Fig. 6, the pressing portion of the cleat base may be dished adjacent the oter terminus of the recess 21 to provide a preformed annular expansion chamber 36 into which a ilangelike portion 31 may be distorted and pressed axially between the washer on the sole and the cleat base. This feature is particularly advantageous when the distortability of the cleat body is very limited, insuring as it does rm support and seating of the Aouter marginal portion of the Hase on the washer and at the same time facilitating the formation of the fiangelike portion. In vall other respects the assembly shown in Fig. 6, including the modified cleat I 5a, is exactly the same as the one shown in Fig.'- 3.

It is thus seen that with the present invention a cleat assembly is provided which when operatively associated with a' shoe sole as shown in Figs. 3 or 6, will be most eiectively maintained in a tightened condition. In this connection it is to be noted that a -iirm and forced frictional grip is provided between the side walls of the locking member and the side walls defining the main portion 3i of the receiving recess 21, between the walls dening the bore of the locking member and the threaded stud, between the distorted flangelike portion 35 of the locking member and thecleat base and washer, between the lower end of the locking member and the shoulder 33 in the recess, and between the upper end of the locking member and the central portion of the washer. Moreover, and of particular importance these several gripping actions are supplemented by the more positive engagement of the laterally distorted portions 34 with the shoulders provided by the pocket portions 32 ofthe receiving recess, by the distorted portions 35a engaging in the slots I3 in the washer, and by the ribs 23 on the washer engaging Athe upper end of the locking member;l

It will be readily appreciated that while with a cleat assembly 'constructed according to the teachings of the present invention the ground engaging element or cleat'is very firmly and securely held against adverse' turning and unscrewing relative tothe holding stud I5 and sole it may be removed by forced unscrewing due to the distortable nature oi' the locking member which initially and as shown most clearly in Figs. l and 2 is of a simple cylindrical form and hence may be very easily and cheaply produced, as' for example, by cutting to requisite length sections of rubber tubing scrap.

In Figs. 7' through 10 there is shown the application of the present invention to a cleat assembly of the type in which a threaded stud 38 is xed in a cleat 39 and has a threaded shank portion 40 which projects from the base 4I of the cleat to be received in a suitable complementary securing member 42 iixed in the shoe sole. A cleat assembly of this type is shown in United States Patent 2,161,883 and reference is made to that patent for a more detailed description of the complemental securing member and the manner in which radially extending gripping ngers 43 are provided thereon and overlie the outer side of the sole.

As shown in Figs. 7 and 8, the cleat 38, which like the cleat in the forms rst described may be of moldable material such as rubber, Bakelite, or the like, has molded therein the head portion 44 of the stud 3B so that the outwardly projecting threaded shank portion 40 is held securely in position relative to the body of the cleat and to a bushing receiving recess 45 formed in the latter and dened at its outer terminus by an annular pressing portion 46 of the cleat base. Advantageously, and as shown, this pressing portion is countersunk relative to the marginal seating surface 41 of the base.

Located in the recess 45 and receiving the shank portion of the stud therein is a bushinglike vlocking member 29 exactly the same as the locking member rst described and being so proportioned relative to the recess that when initially fully located therein, a portion of the locking member projects outwardly therebeyond to engage with the securing member 42 and the radially extending gripping ngers 43 thereon when the cleat is screwed up toward the sole.

As in the case with the assemblies illustrated in Figs. 3 and 6, when the cleat 39 of Figs. 7 and 8 is screwed up toward the sole the outwardly projecting portion of the locking member is distorted laterally to form an annular angelike portion 48 which is axially pressed intermediate the pressing portion of the cleat base and the sole. Concurrently, the side walls of the locking member conned in the recess 45 are forced into Very snug and firm frictional gripping relationship with the side walls of the latter which in the form shown in Figs. 7 and 8 conform or substantially conform to the initial transverse cross sectional shape and size of the locking'member and the walls of the locking member bore are.

pressed against the threaded stud.

Advantageously and as shown in Fig. 9 the bushing receiving recess 45 may be formed with a plurality oipocket portions 49, similar to the pocket portions in the forms illustrated in Figs. 1-6, laterally oiset from and communicating with the main portion of the recess into which the locking member is initially inserted to provide a modified cleat 39a. With this construction, it will be readily appreciated, circumferentially spaced portions, exactly like the portions 34 shown in Fig. 4, are laterally distorted on the locking member to engage in the pocket portions 49 when the cleat is screwed up on the sole.

Also advantageously and as shown in Fig. 9, teeth 58 may be formed on the countersunk pressing portion of the cleat base to engage with the distorted iiangelike portion 48 of the locking member when the latter is pressed axially intermediate the inner closed terminus of the recess and the sole upon the screwing up of the cleat.

The more positive holding action achieved in an assembly including a cleat provided with the pocket portions 49 and in addition or alternatively thereto the teeth 48, is particularly advantageous and is preferred. Howevrr the' forced gripping of the locking member relative to the sidewalls and to the inner terminus of the recess 41, and the forced gripping of the distorted fiangelike portion 48 with the pressing portion of the cleat, apart from the more positive action made possible by the utilization of the pocket portions 49 and the teeth 48, and as shown in Fig. 7, also serve'to maintain the locking member and cleat against unforced turning relative to each other.

The action of the radially extending flange 43 in engaging the outer end of the locking member is similar to the action of the slots I8 and ribs 20 of the washer shown in connection with Figs. 1-6 in most eiectively maintaining the locking member against-unforced turning movement relative to the soleand stud.

While preferably and as shown, the bushinglike locking member is proportioned to initially fit into the locating and coniining recess in the cleat in the several forms illustrated in Figs. 1-10, it should be appreciated and undeistood that certain advantageous features of the invention may still be realized even though the locking member initially be of a somewhat larger transverse cross section than the recess. In such a case, upon axially compressing the locking member on drawing up the cleat, the central portion thereof will be distorted up into the recess and into' gripping relation with the side walls thereof and with the threaded stud, and the projecting end portion laterally distorted intrmediate the cleat and sole.

With the forms of the invention shown in Figs. 7-10 as with the forms of the invention shown in Figs. 1-6, therefore, it is seen that a cleat assembly is provided in which the removable cleat is securely held in position on the shoe sole and yet in which, because of the distortable and preferably resilient nature of the simple and easily made bushinglike locking member 29, the cleat may be removed by forced unscrewing without damaging the cleat or the elements by which it is secured to the sole. Should the locking member become worn or otherwise damaged it may be readily replaced, and, because of its simplicity of form and ease of making, this at a negligible cost.

Variations and modiiications may be made Within the scope of this invention and portions of the improvements may be used without others.

Having thus described. the invention, what is claimed as new is:

1. In combination with a shoe sole, a cleat having formed in the base thereof a recess with a plurality of pocket portions communicating therewith and extending laterally therefrom; a bushinglikelocking member of distortable material, having a normal nondistorted form, located in said recess and in its nondistorted form being clear of said pockets; a washerlike member on said sole, underlying said base and said locking memberpgripping means on said washer cooperable with said locking member; and means including a stud threadedly connected to said' cleat and extending through said locking member, for drawing said cleat toward said sole, thereby axially compressing said locking member and distorting the same laterally into said pockets.

2. In combination with a shoe sole, a cleat having formed in the base thereof a recess with at least one pocket communicating therewith and extending laterally outward therefrom; a locking member of distortable material, located in said recess; gripping means on said sole; and screw means for drawing said cleat towards said sole, causing said locking member to pressingly engage with said gripping means and to be distorted laterally into said pocket.

3. In combination with a shoesole, a cleat having a base with a recess formed therein defined at its outer terminus by a pressing portion of said base, said recess having a main portion and at least one pocket portion, said pocket portion extending laterally from said main portion, communicating therewith and being of limited circumferential extent relative thereto; a bushinglike locking member of distortable material, having a portion confined in said recess main portion and having a portion projecting axially therebeyond; and screw means for drawing said cleat towards said sole, causing said conned portion to be distorted laterally into said pocket and said projecting portion to be distorted laterally between said pressing portion and the sole.

4. A cleat device for association with a shoe sole, including a cleat having a base with a recess therein dened laterally by side walls; an inset pressing portion on said base, encircling said recess; first gripping means on said pressing portion; second gripping means on said sole; a bushinglike locking member of distortable material, having a nondistorted normal form, located in said recess and having a portion projecting outwardly therebeyond, said projecting portion being in its nondistorted normal form of no greater lateral extent than said recess; and means including a threaded stud adapted to extend through said locking member, for drawing said cleat toward said sole, thereby axially pressing said locking member therebetween to force the latter tightly against said recess side walls, to distort said projecting portion laterally intermediate said pressing portion and said sole, and to cause opposed gripping action on said locking member by said first and second gripping means.

5. In combination with a shoe sole, a cleat having a base with a recess therein, said recess having at least one pocket portion of limited circumferential extent relative thereto, communicating therewith and extending laterally outward therefrom; means including a threaded stud extending through said recess, for drawing said cleat toward the sole; gripping means on said cleat and sole; and a bushinglike locking member of distortable material, on said threaded stud intermediate said cleat and said sole and pressed axially between the latter and in said recess, with portions distorted into locking en communicating therewith and extending later" ally outward therefrom; means including a threaded stud adapted to extend through said recess, for drawing said cleat toward said sole; and a bushinglike locking member of distortable material on said stud intermediate said cleat and said sole, adapted to be pressed axially in said recessand distorted into said pocket portion when said cleat is drawn towards said sole.

7. In combination with a shoe sole, a cleat having in the base thereof a recess dened laterally by a perimetric wall formation with at least one section offset laterally and defining a pocket portion of said recess of limited perimetric extent; a bushinglike locking memberof distortable material, having a normal nondistorted form, located in said recess and in its nondistorted form being clear of said pocket portion; gripping means on said sole, cooperable with said locking member; and means including a threaded stud extending through said locking member, for drawing said cleat toward said sole, causing said locking member to be pressed axially between said cleat and said gripping means and to be distorted laterally into said pocket portion.

8. In combination with a shoe sole, a cleat having formed in the base thereof a recess with at least one pocket communicating therewith and extending laterally outward therefrom; a locking member of distortable material, located in said recess; and screw means for drawing said cleat toward said sole, causing said locking member to be axially pressed between the cleat and sole and to be distorted laterally into said pocket.

9. A cleat device for association with a shoe sole, including a cleat; a bushinglike locking member of distortable material having a normal nondistorted form; and screw means for drawing said cleat towards said sole, said cleat having a base with a recess therein for receiving-a portion of said locking member with another portion of the latter projecting axially therebeyond, said recess being dened at its outer terminus by an inset pressing portion of said base, and said recess having at least one pocket portion extending laterally therefrom, said locking member in its nondistorted form being clear of said pocket portion and adapted to be pressed axially intermediate said cleat and said sole, whereby said portion of said locking member in said recess is distorted laterally into said pocket portion and said protecting portion is distorted laterally between saidinset pressing portion and the sole.

HOWARD M. PIERCE. JOI-IN H. HERMSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2470997 *Feb 4, 1946May 24, 1949Robert MckenzieShoe spike
US2506801 *Dec 4, 1947May 9, 1950Harris Harold MacneillSpike for shoes
US3101763 *Jun 1, 1959Aug 27, 1963M & S Mfg CoCleat mounting washer
US3223371 *Oct 31, 1963Dec 14, 1965Fred J MillerBracket for supporting rails
US3747657 *Apr 23, 1971Jul 24, 1973Value Eng Co IncNut type fastener
US3785420 *May 26, 1972Jan 15, 1974R BradleyRivet and setting tool therefor
US3997138 *Jun 16, 1975Dec 14, 1976Henry Vernon CrockSecuring devices and structures
US4475859 *Aug 24, 1981Oct 9, 1984H & H Oliver CorporationRivetless anchor nut and method
US5033211 *Aug 30, 1989Jul 23, 1991Macneill Engineering Company, Inc.Cleat member and slot system
US5901472 *Mar 11, 1997May 11, 1999Diversified Industrial Technology, Inc.Athletic shoe system and removable cleat
US5993320 *Mar 5, 1998Nov 30, 1999Stafast Products Inc.Tee nut and method of manufacture
US6095738 *Jul 11, 1997Aug 1, 2000Stafast Products, Inc.Tee nut and method of manufacture
US7070378 *Jan 6, 2003Jul 4, 2006Intier Automotive Inc.Heatstake
US7370441 *Jan 5, 2006May 13, 2008Chuan-Li ChangHobnail structure
US7827706 *Nov 9, 2010Adidas International Marketing B.V.Detachable cleat system
US20050207864 *Jan 6, 2003Sep 22, 2005Grabowski David NHeatstake
US20070172331 *Jan 5, 2006Jul 26, 2007Chuan-Li ChangHobnail structure
US20080163438 *Mar 20, 2008Jul 10, 2008Adidas International Marketing B.V.Detachable Cleat System
USRE42965Nov 29, 2011Sure Foot CorporationAnti-slip overshoe
USRE44193 *May 7, 2013Sure Foot CorporationReplaceable spikes for anti-slip overshoe
WO1991003183A1 *Aug 28, 1990Mar 21, 1991Macneill Engineering Company, Inc.Cleat member and slot system
WO1997015206A1 *Oct 23, 1996May 1, 1997Hoel Karl WillieImpact-cushioning device for sports footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00R, 36/67.00D, 411/956, 411/968, 411/176, 411/959
International ClassificationA43C15/16
Cooperative ClassificationY10S411/956, Y10S411/968, A43C15/161, Y10S411/959
European ClassificationA43C15/16A