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Publication numberUS2292299 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 4, 1942
Filing dateJul 22, 1939
Priority dateJul 22, 1939
Publication numberUS 2292299 A, US 2292299A, US-A-2292299, US2292299 A, US2292299A
InventorsSmith Tucker P
Original AssigneeSpalding A G & Bros Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Athletic shoe
US 2292299 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 4, 1942. 2 T. P. SMITH 2,292,299

ATHLETIC SHOE Filed July 22, 1939 A m/ M Patented Aug. 4, 1942 ATHLETIC SHOE Tucker P. Smith, Columbus, Ohio, assignor to A. G. Spalding & Bros, Inc., Chicopee, Mass, a corporation of Delaware Application July 22, 1939, Serial No. 285,875

10 Claims.

This application is in part a continuation of my co-pending application Serial No. 255,681, filed February 10, 1939,

My invention relates to athletic shoes of the cleated type, and has to do more particularly with shoes having molded detachable cleats formed of resilient or distortable material,such as rubber, rubber compositions, etc. My invention is especially applicable but is not limited to shoes equipped with cleats of this type especially adapted for the game of football.

In general, molded resilient or distortable cleats have been known and used for some time. However, such cleats are subject to the objection that, when applied to shoes by an automatic tool, as is usually the case in a factory, the force which is applied to the cleats in tightening them up against the sole frequently results in distorting the cleat from a true conical shape to one having arcuate sides in Vertical section, or may partly tear the plastic material from its embedded metal supporting parts. It has been found that a cleat which is thus distorted is under such severe strains that it may easily be torn off its metal supports by even a slight blow, as in play.

On the other hand, if insufficient pressure is applied in securing the cleat to the shoe, the cleats of the type previously known and used have been subject to backing off in play, often resulting in the exposure of a naked metal stud, which is a source of great physical hazard.

A particular object of my invention is to provide a cleat of normally distortable material which is so designed that, even though great force may be applied when the cleat is secured to the shoe, the cleat will be substantially non-distortable from a true frusto-conical or frusto-pyramidal shape, my invention being applicable to both shapes.

Another object is to provide such a device which is simple and inexpensive in construction, durable, and, in general, fully satisfactory for the purposes desired.

Various other objects and advantages will become apparent as the description proceeds.

Referring now to the drawing forming a part of this application and illustrating certain preferred embodiments of my invention:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view, partly in section, of a shoe fitted with cleats embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of the cleat and shoe sole, showing the parts in spaced relation, as in process of assembly;

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2 but with the parts completely assembled;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a compression member forming an element of the combination shown in Figs. 2 and 3 for retaining the parts on the shoe;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig, 3 but showing a different embodiment of my invention;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view, partly in section, of a compression member forming an element of the combination of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Figs. 3 and 5 but showing still another embodiment of my invention;

Figs. 8 and 9 are perspective views of inserts forming elements of the combinations of Figs. 3 and 7, and

Fig. 10 is a perspective view, with part cut away to show a cross section,'showing my invention applied to a pyramidal type of cleat.

Referring first to Figs. 1-4 and 8, inclusive, the numeral I0 represents generally a shoe having an upper ll, an insole 12, an outer sole l3 and a sock lining I4. A sole tap I 5 and a heel tap 16 are secured to the sole as by stitching, and steel plates l8, l8 may be inserted between the sole and the sole and heel taps, respectively, in accordance with the usual preferred practice.

According to one preferred embodiment, threaded studs 20 extend through the sole, the heads 2| of said studs being countersunk in the upper face of the sole l3 and the shaft of each stud being upset as at 2| against a metal washer 22 which seats against the bottom of the sole and heel taps, thus clamping the stud in the sole. These washers 22 are preferably provided with tangs 2i struck out from the washers and extending downwardly therefrom.

Attached to the shoe is a plurality of molded conical cleats 25 of resilient rubber, composition or similar material, having an axial bore 26 with which is aligned a threaded nut 21 imbedded in the cleat. The bore 26 communicates with a countersink 28 having a lower restricted portion 29. Within the countersink 28 is formed one or more beveled or inclined serrations or teeth 32 arranged in pinwheel or ratchet-like formation.

Interposed between the cleat 25 and the metal washer 22 is a disc-shaped member 35 which, in the form shown, has one smooth face which is adapted to be disposed toward the metal washer 22. On its opposite face is an outwardly extending annular shoulder 36 adapted to seat in the cavity 29 of the cleat, while the annular portion outside of the shoulder is provided with serrations 38 similar to the serrations 32 of the cleat, so that when the cleat and disc 35 are assembled, as in Figs. 2 and 3, the serrations 32 and. 38 will be disposed oppositely or in a position to interlock with each other. The disc 35 is formed of suitable flexible and frictional material. It may be formed of leather or fiber having high frictional and flexible qualities, but I prefer to use material which has also a substantial degree of elasticity, such as rubber, so that when the cleat is screwed up tight against the sole of the shoe, as shown in Fig. 3, the disc 35 will be expanded diametrically as it is compressed. Thus, it will be seen that the member 35 is normally smaller in diameter than the countersink 28 in the upper portion of the cleat but, when expanded under compression, it substantially fills this space, the teeth of the disc being tightly interlocked with those of the cleat so that a considerable force will be required to back off the cleat from the sole. It will also be noted that the tangs 24 struck down from the metal washer 22 bite into the member 35, looking it against rotation.

The serrations 32 and 38 act substantially as a ratchet and pawl in interlocking relation. The number of teeth on both cleat and disc may be reduced to one, or other desired number, and, instead of opposed teeth, I may provide one or more projections of other suitable form to cooperate with each other. Furthermore, I may provide the ratchet like teeth on both faces of disc 35, or omit them entirely from this member and provide them only on the cleat which will cooperate with washer 22, omitting the disc entirely.

While it is impossible for a cleat to be accidentally displaced when attached in accordance with my invention, it will be apparent that it may be removed by a suitable tool when it is desired to replace a cleat with a new one or one of a different type.

Molded in the cleat 25 is a relatively stiff member 49, preferably of metal, which extends substantially from edge to edge of the cross sectional thickness of the cleat. This member 4!! may take various forms and shapes and also may be positioned at different points in the top to bottom dimension of the cleat. It is preferably spaced from both ends and may take any intermediate position, or it may be close to the upper or larger end of the cleat. This member is preferably formed of metal, and it is also desirable that it be somewhat dished or concave on its upper face as at 52. (Fig. 8). The insert 4%! is also preferably provided with apertures 43 so that the plastic material of the cleat may flow therethrough and securely lock the insert in place. The insert may also be threaded in its centralbore as at 44 to form an additional lock for the stud 20. The insert may be formed as aseparate member, as shown in Fig. 8, or, if desired, it may be formed integrally with the nut 21.

Another embodiment of my invention is shown in Fig. 5, wherein I have shown a female stud 46 inserted in the sole of the shoe, a male stud 48 having a head 43 being molded in the cleat 25a. Formed on the head 49 of the stud is an enlarged disc or flange 50 extending diametrically of the cleat 25a. throughout its major cross sectional extent. In this case the transverse member 59 is shown as substantially fiat, but it may be dished, as shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 8. In this embodiment I have shown a different type of resilient retaining member 52 interposed between the cleat and the shoe sole, the member 52 being approximately elliptical in cross section, as shown best in Fig. 6, so that, when compressed, it expands diametrically and forms a tight frictional lock between the cleat and sole. If desired, teeth may be formed on one or more surfaces of the compression member 52 as well as on the upper face of the cleat, and a locking Washer (not shown) similar to washer 22 may be threaded on the outside of stud 46 clamping it to the sole.

Referring now to Figs. '7 and 9, in this case the cleat 25b is of the female type, as in Figs. 2 and 3, adapted to be secured to a stud 20 which is attached to the shoe sole. In this case there is molded into the cleat 25?) above the imbedded nut 55 a non-yieldable insert 58 which comprises a dished portion 58 substantially similar to the dished insert 40 (Fig. 8) and having integral therewith an upstanding wall portion 60. The wall portion 60 may be substantially-coextensive with the lateral face of the cleat, but, for the sake of appearance, I prefer to extend a thin coating SI of plastic material of the cleat over the wall in order that the metal insert does not show. In this case also, the insert may either be formed separately or integrally with the nut 55.

In this case I have omitted the use of a retaining member between the cleat and the washer 22, the tang or tangs 24 of the washer serving as a pawl or lock in cooperation with the teeth 32 formed on the upper surface of the cleat. It will be understood that, in turning up the cleat against the shoe sole, the teeth 32 are ratcheted into the locking position with the tangs 24.

In all of the embodiments the transverse inserts, such as 48, 50 and 58, serve substantially to prevent distortion of the cleat from a true conical form when it is turned up against the shoe sole, even though great pressure may be applied. Although a fiat insert, as shown at 5 (Fig. 5), will accomplish the improved results, it is found that the dished inserts are especially satisfactory in preventing spreading and insuring even seating of the cleat even when screwed up with great force.

Fig. 10 shows my invention as applied to a molded pyramidal or square type of cleat 250, having an insert 55 for preventing distortion of the cleat when screwed up against a shoe sole. The insert may take any of the form described above for conical cleats. Various other changes and modifications coming within the spirit of my invention may suggest themselves to those skilled in the art, and hence I do not wish to be limited to the specific forms shown or uses mentioned except to the extent indicated in the appended claims, which are to be interpreted as broadly as the state of the art will permit.

I claim:

1. A shoe cleat formed of distortable plastic material and having means imbedded therein for rotatably attaching the cleat to a cooperating member of a shoe, the outside diameter of said means being substantially smaller than any adacent diameter of the cleat, and a member imbedded within the cleat for preventing distortion thereof when the cleat is forced against the shoe sole, said last mentioned member extending substantially across said cleat and outwardly of said attaching means and being spaced a substantial distance from both ends of the cleat so as to have a relatively large bearing area transversely of said cleat.

2. A shoe cleat formed of distortable plastic material and having means imbedded therein for rotatably attaching the cleat to a cooperating member of a shoe, said attaching means having formed integrally therewith a member extending transversely of the cleat and outwardly of said attaching means approximately to the lateral face of the cleat for preventing distortion of the cleat when the latter is forced against a shoe sole, said member being spaced a substantial distance from both ends of the cleat and extending a substantial distance outwardly from said attaching means so as to have a relatively large bearing area transversely of said cleat.

3. A shoe cleat formed of distortable material and adapted for rotatable attachment to a cooperating member of a shoe, and a member imbedded within the cleat for preventing distortion thereof when the cleat is forced against the shoe sole, said last mentioned member comprising a dished disc extending substantially across the cleat.

4. A shoe cleat formed of distortable material and adapted for rotatable attachment to a cooperating member of a shoe, and a member imbedded within the cleat for preventing distortion thereof when the cleat is forced against the shoe sole, said last mentioned member comprising an upwardly concave disc extending substantially across the cleat.

5. A shoe cleat formed of distortable plastic material and having an element imbedded therein adapted for rotatable attachment to a cooperatin member of a shoe, and a substantially non-distortable plate imbedded within the cleat for preventing distortion thereof when the cleat is forced against the shoe sole, said plate extending substantially across said cleat and a substantial distance outwardly of said element to provide a large bearing area transversely of the cleat and being perforated to permit intimate interlocking with the cleat;

6. A shoe cleat formed of distortable material and adapted for rotatable attachment to a cooperating member of a shoe, and a substantially non-'distortable member imbedded within the cleat for preventing distortion thereof when the cleat is forced against the shoe sole, said last mentioned member comprising an upwardly concave disc extending substantially across the cleat and being perforated to permit intimate interlooking with the cleat.

'2'. A shoe cleat formed of distortable plastic material, and an axially threaded plate imbedded in said cleat a substantial distance from both ends thereof and extending substantially from side to side thereof, said plate having a relatively large area on opposite sides thereof bearing directly against the plastic material of said cleat.

8. A shoe cleat formed of distortable material, and an axially threaded dished plate imbedded in said cleat a substantial distance from both ends thereof and extending substantially from side to side thereof.

9. A shoe cleat formed of distortable material, and an axially threaded dished plate imbedded in said cleat a substantial distance from both ends thereof and extending substantially from side to side thereof, said plate having a peripheral flange.

10. A shoe cleat formed of distortable material and having a standard nut imbedded therein for rotatably attaching the cleat to a threaded stud carried by a shoe, and an axially threaded plate imbedded in said cleat, said plate being coaxial with and adjacent to said nut and extending substantially from side to side of said cleat.

TUCKER P. SMITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2784503 *Jun 29, 1954Mar 12, 1957Anderson John WShakeproof screw fastening
US4712318 *Jan 27, 1987Dec 15, 1987Adidas Sportschuhfabriken Adi Dassler Stiftung & Co. KgGripping element for a sports shoe
US5123184 *Nov 23, 1987Jun 23, 1992Ferreira Joseph JRemovable shoe spike lockable to configured sole plate
US5361518 *Sep 29, 1993Nov 8, 1994Tretorn AbSport shoe with an outsole with holding inserts for holding gripping elements
US5524367 *Apr 8, 1992Jun 11, 1996Trisport, Ltd.Removable shoe spike lockable to configured sole plate
US5887371 *Feb 18, 1997Mar 30, 1999Curley, Jr.; John J.Footwear cleat
US6094843 *Dec 9, 1998Aug 1, 2000Softspikes, Inc.Footwear cleat
US6209230Apr 11, 2000Apr 3, 2001John J. Curley, Jr.Footwear cleat
US6834445Jul 16, 2002Dec 28, 2004Softspikes, LlcShoe cleat with improved traction
US6834446Aug 27, 2002Dec 28, 2004Softspikes, LlcIndexable shoe cleat with improved traction
US7040043Aug 11, 2004May 9, 2006Softspikes, LlcShoe cleat
WO1989004616A1 *Nov 22, 1988Jun 1, 1989Foot Joy IncRemovable shoe spike lockable to configured sole plate
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00R, 36/67.00D
International ClassificationA43C15/00, A43C15/16
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/161
European ClassificationA43C15/16A