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Publication numberUS2293298 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 18, 1942
Filing dateJul 25, 1941
Priority dateJul 25, 1941
Publication numberUS 2293298 A, US 2293298A, US-A-2293298, US2293298 A, US2293298A
InventorsJames M Macdonald
Original AssigneeJames M Macdonald
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game device
US 2293298 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 1s, 1942.

J. M. MACDONALD GAME DEVICE Filed July 25, 194] OOOOOGOOO 3 2 x 0. 1% 1L oo oo oo 0.o oo o0 OO OO 000000000023 2me/@0.0 @Elm/0 O O O. O O O O O O O O O O O O O O .O O .O

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James N. ./Y donald Vfor communication between the players.

Patented Aug. 18, 1942 ETENT OFFICE GAME DEVICE James M. Macdonald, Evanston, Il l.

Application July 25, 1941, Serial No. 404,088

14 Claims.

This invention relates to anamusement device. More specifically it relates to a game device by which one player guesses the location -of objects placed -by another player.

In games of the type known as Battleship or Salvo wherein a player attempts to determine the location of unseen markers representing warships of various sorts located as desired .by his opponent, playing boards or sheets are such that the one player must rely on his opponent to inform him, at 'the end of his turn, how many hits he has -made in his turn. When the game is played on two sheets oiV paper with marks representing locations, not only `must the player rely on `his opponent to tell him of the scoring of hits, but he must also tell the opponent .of the point yat `which he has directed a shot. Thus the .players must suffer a greatdeal of annoyance while playing, for they must communicate each time a shot is made. This requirement for constant .communicatonlbetween opponents detracts from the realism Aof the game. With the device .of the present invention, Battleship or Salvo `cannot be played as it is generally played, 'but a modified form of the game may be played without the requirement With this device the player making a shot is informed immediately and 'automatically whether the shot has scored a hit.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved amusement device. A further Vobject of the present invention is the provision ,of an improved device of the type wherein a player attempts to deter-mine the location of markers placed as desired by an opponent.

Another object is to |provide a device by which a player attempts to .establish the 'location of points selected .by an opponent.

A still further object is the provision of a game device which a ,player is automatically informed When he has established :the location of points chosen byvan opponent.

According to the present invention, a vertically held `.board provided with a plurality of openings carries a `plurality of `movable members in the openings. One player places markers as desired on some of the members at one side of the board. Another ,player at the vother side of the board from`whom the markers are invisible moves the members in an attempt to locate the markers. When he moves a member supporting a marker, the marker falls to the supporting surface 4of the board and becomes visible to the player through aspace between the lower side of the boardand the supporting surface.

In the drawing,

Figure l is an elevational view of the nevel device of the present invention; l

Figure 2 is a sectional View through a portion of the device;

Figures 3, .4, and' 5 lare elevational views of a portion of the device;

Figure .6 is a sectional View through a portion of a modified `iorm of device;

Figure 7 is an elevational view of a portion of the modied iormof device; and

Fig-ure 8 is a sectional view `of a portion of a second `modified form of device.

The reference character 'I0 designates a board held vertical by supporting blocks II on a horizontal supporti-ng part I2, which may be `a `table top. "Ihe lower side of the board IIl is so shaped that Athere fis a space I3 of yconsiderable height between the board and the supporting part. The board is provided with two sets of one hundred openings I4 yin which are positioned two sets of one hundred members |15 which are generally 4of` the shape of pins. As' seen in Figures 2 and 3, each opening III Ahas an upwardly extending key slot :I6 through which a key II on a member I5 passes inthe insertion of Vthe member in the opening. After the insertion has been made, the member is turned through degrees so `that the key I'I extends downwardly, and Ythe member cannot be withdrawn. The upright portion of the `letter A on the head off the member as shown in Figure 4 indicates that the key Il `extends downwardly. The member is provided `with a groove I8 for the reception of a circular marker .I9 in hole Y20 which is of a diameter larger than the diameter of the pin-:plusthe height of the key I'I. The opposite yend of the member I5 is provided with an enlarged head 2I which also hasa groove 22 for the reception of marker I9 as shown in dotted lines. For dislodgment of the marker I9 from the full-line position `of Figure 2, the member I5 is grasped ,by the head ZI and is moved to the left as viewed in Figure 2. The key I'I prevents withdrawal of the member I5 by this movement, but, when the key is brought against the board I the marker I9 will have been forced out of the groove I8 by contact with the board I il and will fall off the end of the member I'5. Since the diameter of the opening 20 in Athe marker I9 is greater than the diameter of the member I5 plus the height of the key I1, the key will not prevent dislodgment of the marker. The marker may be then placed in the groove 22 on the head 2| of the member I5 on the other side of the board I0 as a reminder that a marker has been dislodged from the pin. The grooves I8 and 22 prevent accidental dislodgment of the marker.

As previously stated the board I5 is provided with two sets of 100 holes I4 in which two sets of members I5 are inserted. This member is merely illustrative and may be larger or smaller as desired. For the playing of a modied form of Battleship or Salvo a player on the front side of the board may place four circular markers I9 on pins I5 of the set of holes at the right end of the board in a line as indicated in designation of a battleship. The pins I5 in the right set of holes all have their keys I1 extending from the front of the board as viewed in Figure 1, although the keys are not shown because of the small scale of Figure 1. The player also places three markers 23 at the right of Figure 1 as shown, which markers are square instead of round in designation of a cruiser. He also places two sets of triangular markers 24 in designation of two destroyers. A player at the other side of the board places similar markers I9, 23, and 24, as shown in dotted lines, at the other side of the board on members I 5 in the set of holes I4 at the left edge of the board. These markers are invisible to the player at the front side of the board. The heads of these members protrude from the front side of the board. The player takes turns of four shots each which consist of pulls of the members I5 toward the player making the pull. When a member supporting a marker is pulled, the marker is dislodged and falls to the supporting part I2, being visible through the space I3. The player may place the dislodged marker upon the member from which it was dislodged, on the head 2I in the manner indicated in dotted lines in Figure 2, as a reminder to him that a marker was dislodged from that member. The game is continued until one player has sunk all the ships of the other player by dislodging all his markers. Sinking of a ship belonging to a player may reduce the number of shots or pin pulls to which that player is entitled in one turn. The significant thing about the device described is not that a game somewhat like Battleship or any particular type of game is played, but rather that the ring of a shot or any similar act which the pulling of a member is considered to represent automatically discloses by the dropping of a marker that a hit has been made. The one player is not put to the trouble of informing the other player of the whether or not of a hit. This information comes automatically to the player making the hit by the dropping of a marker, and the striking of the marker upon the supporting part I2 provides the player with a considerable thrill, for the striking upon the supporting part simulates to a marked degree the actual making of a hit,

Figures 6 and '1 illustrate a modified form of member 25 which supports a marker AI5 in a groove 26 adjacent an oblique sloping end portion 21. The other end of the member 25 has an enlarged head 28 provided with a groove 29 as in the case of the member I5. For dislodgement of the marker I9 the head 28 is grasped, and the member 25 is rotated. When the sloping end 21 is up, the marker I9 contacts it and slides oi the member 25. With this form of member the key and key slot of Figures 2 to 5, inclusive, are unnecessary.

In the modified form of Figure 8 a member 30 may receive a marker I9 at one end and a marker I9' at the other end. The one end of the member 33 is provided with a key 3l and a groove 32 similar to the key I1 and groove I9 of the member I5. The marker I9 rests on the groove 32. Dislodgment of the marker I9 from the groove 32 is effected by a pull of the member 30 to the right as viewed in Figure 8, a portion 33 at the opposite end of the member being grasped. The said opposite end of the member 30 has a groove 34 and an oblique sloping end surface 35 similar to the groove 25 and sloping surface 21 of the member 25. The marker I9 rests in the groove 34. Dislodgement of marker I5 from the groove 26 is effected by rotation of the member 30. Member 35 may be used when the game is played entirely on one set of holes rather than two sets, and players are manipulating the same set of pins,

It will be apparent from the foregoing description that there has been provided a new and improved type of game device in which one player attempts to locate certain markers positioned at points as desired by another player, these markers being invisible to the one player. The signicant thing is that the determination of the location of the points is automatically made known to the player. This is accomplished by actuatable parts which are in position at the various possible points at the outset of the game. The indicating elements or markers which represent the selection of certain points by the location of them at the points are so associated with the actuatable elements at the certain points that actuation of the actuatable elements causes the indicating elements to make themselves known.

The member II] has been designated as a board, but obviously it need not be of wood but may be of any suitable material. The markers are shown to be of various shapes, since this mode of illustrating different things was more easily illustrated in this way. Obviously they may just as well be of different colors or may be different in other respects of identiication. The operation of the device has been described in reference to a game somewhat like the game Battleship, but obviously other games may be played, and the device may be used for educational purposes as well. It has been stated that the upright posisition of the letter A on head 2I of member I5 as shown in Figure 4 designates that the key I1 extends downwardly and thus that the member I5 is 180 degrees away from a position in which it may be withdrawn from the opening I4. Obviously other position-identifying characters may be employed, and the various members may carry diierent characters as various letters of the alphabet or various members for modification of the game played,

The intention is to limit the invention only within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A game device comprising means forming a rst field, a plurality of actuatable means positionecl at various points in the field and actuatable by a rst player, means forming a second field invisible to the first player, a plurality of target means adapted to be operatively associated on the second eld with the actuatable means at will by a second player and operative upon actuation by the iirst player of the actuatable means associated with the target means to 2. A game device comprising a first board means, a first plurality of .actuatable means` positioned at one side of thev rst board meansy and actuatable by one player at the said one side of the` rst board means, a first plurality oi" indicating. means fewer in number' than the first plurality of actuatable meansl and. positionable at will by another player on the other side of the first board means at points opposite someVV of the rst plurality of actuatablel means and` operable upon actuation of those or the` first plurality of actuatable means at points. opposite them to indicate tothe one player the fact of actuation of actuatable means at points opposite indicating means, a second board means,

a second plurality of actuatable means, positioned at one side of the second board means and actuatable by the said other playerat. the saidv one side of the second board means, and a second plurality of indicating means fewer in number than the second plurality of actuatable means and positionable at will by the said one player on the other side of the second board means at points opposite some of the second plurality of actuatable means and operable upon actuation of those of the second plurality of actuatable means at points opposite them to indicate to the said other player the fact of actuation of actuatable means at points opposite indicating means.

3. A game device comprising a board having a plurality of openings, a plurality of members engaging openings in the board and being movably mounted on the board, a plurality of markers adapted to be held at one side of the board at the openings vand to be releasable so as to drop from the board by movement of the members with respect to the board b-y a player at the opposite side of the board, seeking to learn the location of the markers,

4. A game device comprising a board having a plurality of openings therein, means for supporting the board on a resting place so that the board is vertical and there is a space between the bottom of the board and the resting place, a plurality of members engaging the openings in the board and being movably mounted on the board, and a plurality of markers adapted to be held at the openings at one side of the board and to be released so as to drop to the resting place and to be seen by a player at the other side of the b-Oard through the opening between the board and the resting place, the release of the markers being effected by movement of the markers by force applied to the markers at the said other side of the board by the player at the said other side.

5. A game device comprising a board, a plurality of members extending through the board so as to protude from opposite sides thereof, a plurality of markers less in number Vthan the members and engaging some of the members at one side of the board and disengageable from the members so as to drop from the board by movement of the members with respect to the board by a player at the other side of the board, from whom the markers are invisible, and who is attempting to determine the location of the markers by causing them to be disengaged from the members.

6. A game device comprising a board having a plurality of holes therein, a plurality of members extending through the holes and adapted to be moved with respect tol the board in a direction from one side of the boardv to the other, a plurality of markers adapted to engage the members at one side of the board and to be disengaged from the members so as to drop from the board by movement of the members in a direction from the said one side of the board to the other side by force applied at the other sideby a player at thev other side seeking to learn the location of the markers.

'7. A game device comprising a board having a plurality of openings therein, a plurality of members extending through the openings and adapted to be rotated With respect to the board, a plurality of markers adapted to engage the members at one side of the board and. to be dis engaged from the members by rotation of the members by force applied at the other side of the. board by a player at the said other side seeking tov determine the location of the markers.

8. A game device comprising a boa-rd having a plurality of openings therein, a plurality of members extending through the openings andv protruding from opposite sides of the board a plurality of markers positionable on the members at one side of the board at will by a player at the said one side or the board and releasable so as to drop from the board by movement oi the members with respect to the board by force applied at the other side of the board by another player at said other side seeking to establish the location of the markers, the markers being positionable at the said other side of the board on the protruding portions of the members from which the markers dropped as aid to the said other player in remembering the location of the markers.

9. A game device as speciiied in claim 8, each member having an external groove in which a marker may rest so as to be prevented from accidental disengagement from the member.

l0. A game device comprising a board having a plurality of openings therein, a plurality of members extending through the openings `and adapted to be rotated with respect to the board, a plurality of markers having perforations and adapted to be supported by the members at one side of the board with the members extending through the perforations and to be dropped from the members by rotation of the members by force applied at the other side of the board by a player at the said other side seeking to determine the location of the markers.

11. A game device comprising a board having aplurality of openings therein, a plurality of members extending through the openings and adapted to be rotated with respect to the board and having a sloping portion on one side adjacent one end, a plurality of markers having perforations and positionable at one side of the board on the members at the end adjacent the sloping portion but on the side opposite them with the members extending through' the perforations and being releasable from the members by rotation thereof by force applied at the other side of the board by a player at the said other side of the board seeking to discover the location of the markers, the release of the markers taking place resulting from contact of the markers with the sloping portions of the members.

l2. A game device comprising a board having a plurality of openings therein, a plurality of members extending through the openings and adapted to be moved with respect to the board in a direction from one side of the board to the other side, a plurality of markers having perforations and adapted to be supported by the members at one side of the board with the members exLending through the perforations and tr:- be dropped from the members by movement of the members in a direction from the said one side of the board to the other side by force applied to the markers at the said other side of the board by a player at the said other side seeking to determine the location of the markers.

13. A game device comprising a board having Ya plurality of openings therein, a plurality. of

members engaging the openings and movably mounted on the board, each member having locking means formed thereon which makes possible the withdrawal of the member from an opening in the board in a certain angular position of the member and makes withdrawal impossible upon rotation of the member to another angular position, a plurality of markers adapted to be held at one side of the board and to be releasable so as to drop from the board by movement of the members with respect to the board by a player at the opposite side of the board seeking to learn the location of the markers.

14. A game device comprising a Vertical board having a plurality of openings therein with key slots extending upwardly from the openings a plurality of members having keys extending from one side at one end thereof and positioned in the openings with the keys normally extending downwardly and being at one side of the board, there being indicia at the other end of the members at the other side of the board indicating the fact that the keys extend downwardly and thereby that the members cannot be withdrawn from the board, the members being insertable in the board with the keys extending upwardly and passing through the key slots in the board, a4

plurality of markers having holes therein larger than the diameter of the markers plus the height of the keys and being positionable on the members at the said one side of the board with the members extending through the holes and being releasable from the members by movement thereof in a direction from the said one side of the board to the other side by a force applied at the said other side by a player at the said other side, the keys on the members oiering no resistance to release of the markers since the keys extend downwardly and the holes in the markers are larger than the diameter of the markers plus the height of the keys.

JAMES M. MACDONALD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2463270 *Apr 11, 1945Mar 1, 1949Hirsch Joseph MPeg puzzle pieces and playboard
US2476457 *Oct 28, 1947Jul 19, 1949Schneider William AShiftable panel with marble game board
US2579454 *Dec 14, 1949Dec 25, 1951Achen Robert KPerforated board and push pin for a salvo game
US2793558 *Nov 13, 1953May 28, 1957Block Herman HMusical game
US2794641 *Feb 3, 1954Jun 4, 1957Lynn E BakerGame board apparatus
US2801107 *Jan 14, 1954Jul 30, 1957Jr Carl S GreerThree-dimension tic-tac-toe apparatus
US3353829 *Feb 9, 1965Nov 21, 1967Richard G BoardGame apparatus employing shielded game boards with optical devices for board viewing
US3632110 *Feb 26, 1970Jan 4, 1972Mattel IncBoard game apparatus
US4114892 *Feb 3, 1977Sep 19, 1978Fun Things, Inc.Peg game
US4280704 *Dec 26, 1979Jul 28, 1981Massimei Gerald GMethod for playing a military warfare board game
US4995382 *Apr 28, 1989Feb 26, 1991Smith And Nephew Associated Companies LimitedOpen-cell foam hydrophilic polymer, elastomer met and adhesive
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/265, 273/282.1, D21/337
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00075
European ClassificationA63F3/00A8