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Publication numberUS2293722 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 25, 1942
Filing dateJun 3, 1940
Priority dateJun 3, 1940
Publication numberUS 2293722 A, US 2293722A, US-A-2293722, US2293722 A, US2293722A
InventorsCarl E Erickson
Original AssigneeCarl E Erickson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning machine
US 2293722 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A z- 1942- c. ERICKSON CLEANING MACHINE Filed June 3, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. CARL E. fiRxcKsoN ATTORNEYS 4 MW 0 H HAV/l A. 7 w E J5 J M W Aug. 25, 1942- c. E. ERICKSON 2,293,722

CLEANING MACHINE Filed June 3, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. CARL, E. ERICKSON Patented Aug. 25, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 11 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in cleaning machines.

The main objects of this invention are:

First, to provide an improved device for cleaning rugs and the like which is highly efficient and leaves the rug or object cleaned without an undue amount of moisture.

Second, to provide a cleaning device for rugs and the like which may be used successfully by a relatively unskilled operator.

Third, to provide a cleaning device of the type frequently referred to as a shampooing machine which may be readily embodied as an attachment to vacuum sweepers of the brushing type now quite extensively in use.

, Fourth, to provide a cleaning apparatus of this type which is simple in its parts and adapted to apply and then remove a layer of sudsy cleaning preparation' to thereby loosen and remove dirt and grime from a rug, carpet or the like.

Further objects relating to details and economies of the invention will definitely appear from the description to follow. The invention is defined in the claims.

A structure embodying the features of the invention is clearly illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary side elevation of a vacuum sweeper having my invention embodied therein as an attachment.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary inverted or bottom view of the structure shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 'is an enlarged fragmentary view partially in longitudinal vertical section on line 33 tails. Fig. 4 is a top perspective view of the removable brush casing.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view illustrating details of the air connection and control. 49

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary view partially in section on line 6-8 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view generally similar to that of Fig. 6 illustrating the sweeper with the conventional brush for a sweeper of 45 ing drawing the reference numeral l designates generally a vacuum sweeper of the brush type as exemplified by the machine quite widely used and sold under the trade name Hoover." Since the structural features and operation of this type of vacuum sweeper are well known I do not describe the same in great detail herein save to state that the machine includes a housing or casing l which constitutes a carriage and is provided with a brush chamber 2 in communication with an impeller chamber 3 in which the impeller 4 is mounted and designed to create a vacuum in the brush chamber when operated by an electric motor. This brush chamber in a sweeper of the type illustrated ordinarily carries a brush 5 r0- tatably mounted therein, this being retained by the plate-like keeper or locking arm 6 fulcrumed on the axle of the supporting wheel I. These brush supports are retained by the locking lever 8. I refer specifically to these features because they are directly associated with parts that are replaced by parts of my invention when my invention is embodied as an attachment as illustrated. The shaft of the impeller 4 is disposed vertically and has a pulley 9 on the lower end thereof, the belt 10 extending forwardly into the brush chamber for the purpose of driving the brush in a manner to be described, whether the brush is the conventional vacuum'sweeper brush provements.

When employed as a vacuum sweeper the bottom cover plate ll illustrated in dotted lines in Fig. 1 is attached to the impellerhousing to of Fig. 2 further illustrating the structural deplace the brush chamber in vacuum communication with the impeller chamber. The releasable connection l2 to the impeller housing is provided for this purpose. However, it is to be understood that in use of the machine as a rug scrubbing or shampooing apparatus this cover 7 plate is removed. A bottom coveror retaining plate I3 is likewise removably secured to the bottom of the casing orcarriage. These parts in the embodiment illustrated are the parts of the vacuum sweeper.

Referring to Figs. 3, 4 and v6, the reference numeral l4 generally indicates a brush mounting casing and dirt received of integral metal construction adapted to be removably mounted in the brush chamber 2 of the sweeper in place of the usual brush 5. This casing has a brush l5 rotatably journaled in plates l6 secured in the ends of the housing, the latter being slotted at I! to enable convenient assembly of the brush In the structure illustrated in the accompanyand brush ioumaling Plates r w T'h casline at the portion thereof rotatably receiving the brush l5, but is'provided with a plurality of angularly spaced, inwardly extending, elongated depressions I8 constituting abutments against which the angularly spaced sets of bristles IS on the brush sweep when the brush is rotated. This rotation of the brush is accomplished by the belt l which passes'over a center pulley 20 on the brush. The brush casing I4 is braced by ribs 2| in the region of-the depressions l8 so as to rigidify the structure.

At therear side of the segmental brush receiving and mounting portion of the casing l4, the latter extends outwardly to provide a hollow dirt and grime receptacle 22 adapted to receive moist matter swept from the rug in the operation of the apparatus. The forward lower edge of this hollow receptacle is provided with a slight lip 23 which projects radially relative to the brush axis a slight distance inwardly of the extreme peripheral path described by the tufts of brush bristles l9. Hence, the bristles are given a flicking or whip action in passing this lip to flick the moist dirt or grime into the receptacle 22.

The space between the upper forward edge 24 of the receptacle 22 and the adjacent recess 25 in the segmental or brush mounting portion of the casing acts in the same manner as the abutments l8; that is, it extends radially inwardly of the brush axis to a point substantially coincident with the extreme periphery of the bristle travel, so that the bristles wipe against theseabutments and tend to flick moist dirt and grime into the successive recesses 25, 26, 21, thereby cleaning the brushes for a subsequent engagement with the rug. A final wiping of the bristles is had by engagement thereof with the lower edge 28 of the recesses'21.

As pointed out above, the closure plate II for the vacuum impeller housing is removed when the apparatus is operating as a shampooing machine, there being no vacuum within the casing at such time.

In order to prevent the throwing of moist dirt or grime laterally into the space in which belt I'll is disposed, the receptacle 22 is provided with wall-like splash guards 29 at either side of the space, thereby in efiect subdividing the receptacle 22 into two independent receptacles. The outline of a central passage through the recep tacle portion 22 of the casing is indicated in dotted lines 30 in Fig. 2. This accommodates the brush driving belt Hi.

It will be understood that the casing l4 and brush journaled therein are substituted in their entirety for the conventionalvacuum sweeper brush 5, the detent plate 6 of the machine coacting with the brush journaling member 3| in the sam manner as it does when the conventional brush is employed. In this manner the casing l4 and associated parts are operatively held in the housing. The bottom cover plate I3 is applied following mounting of the casing M in the vacuum housing to hold the casing there- For the purpose of applying a quantity of sudsy cleaning liquid to the rug in advance of the brush I5, I provide a receptacle or tank 32 for the liquid detergent or cleaning agent 33, this tank having a hanger 34 on the rear side thereof engageable in a slot 35 on the front of the brush housing 2 to suspend the tank on the housing. The tank engages the sweeper bumper I ing 4 is generally arcuate or segmental in outi 36 at its lower rear edge so that a stable support for the reservoir is provided.

The reservoir has a filling opening provided with a closure 31 and has an opening 38 oi. sub.- stantial size at the front thereof defined by the rearwardly and upwardly projecting and overhanging lip 39 over which suds evolved from the cleaning liquid 33 are discharged onto the rug, as illustrated in Fig. 3. For the purpose of generating suds in the tank or reservoir the latter 'is provided with a vertical air tube 40 communieating with a hollow perforated rod 4| disposed horizontally adjacent the bottom of the' tank. Air discharged'through the tube 40 and perforations of the hollow rod 4| generates bubbles in the liquid 33 which rise and are discharged over lip 39 onto the rug in the manner illustrated in Fig. 3.

In order to supply air for the generation of bubbles, I connect tube 43 by means of a flexible conduit 42 with a suitable point on the impeller housing, utilizing a fitting 43 extending into the housing for this purpose. It will be evident that the impeller 4 generates a substantial blast of air into the bag of the sweeper, part of which amount of air discharged to the reservoir.

From the foregoing it is believed that the operation of my attachmentin association with the sweeper will be apparent. When the reservoir 32 is filled with liquid cleaning agent, the cover plate H for the impeller housing being removed, and the motor energized to operate the device, a copious quantity of suds is discharge on the rug and immediately thereafter swept up by brush l5 to deposit dirt, grime and the like, loosened and picked up by the suds, in the receptacle 22 or one of the recesses 25, 26, 21, there being no redepositing of the grime on the rug by reason of the cleaning action to which the brush bristles are subjected. I find that the shampooing action is very effective. The parts of the attachment or device making the same possible are simple and. relatively inexpensive, and the operation of mounting the attachment on a sweeper to convert the same to a shampooing apparatus consumes but very little time. The ready removability of the brush journaling casing and brush therein enables the same to be easily removed from the sweeper at periodic intervals for flushing, out the interior to cleanse the same of dirt, mud, grime, lint and the like which have accumulated therein.

I have illustrated and described my invention in an embodiment which I have found very practical and effective. I have not attempted to 11- lustrate or describe other adaptations which I contemplate as I believe the disclosure made will enable those skilled in the art to embody or adapt the invention as may be desired.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In combination with a vacuum sweeper of the brush type, means for readily and quickly converting said sweeper to a rug shampooing device, comprising a combined brush journaling casing and dirt receiver adapted to be mounted in the brush housing of the sweeper in place of the conventional sweeper brush, said casing having an elongated segmental hollow brush Jourr naling portion provided with a plurality of an- 'gularlyspac'ed elongated radial projections den'ing spaced elongated recesses internally of said portion, a rearwardly extending dirt receptacle communicating'with said portion at its forvjward edges,' and a rotary brush journaled in said portion havingbristles engageable with said prodirt into, said receptacle, ,and means removably mountable on said sweeper for generating a the same downwardlyonflarug.

sections to flick moistdirt into said'recessea, there being a lip adjacent one advance edge of the receptacle engageable .by said bristles to cause the'same'to flick substantial quantities of quantity. ofsudsy cleaning agent and directing 2. In' combination with a vacuum sweeper 0f the brush type, means for readily and quickly converting said sweeper to a rug shampooing device, com rising a combined brush journaling casing and dirt receiver adapted to be mounted in the brush housing of the sweeper in place of the conventional sweeper brush, said casing having an elongated-segmental hollow brush journaling portion provided with a plurality of angularly spaced elongated radial projections defining spaced elongated recesses internally of said portion, a rearwardly extendin dirt receptacle communicating with said portion at its foradjacent said projections for the reception of dirt flicked from said bristles upon engagement thereof with said projections, and means operatively connected to said casing for generating a quantity of suds and applying the same to a, rug in advance of the brush.

6,. In combination with a vacuum sweeper of the brush type, means for readily and quickly converting said sweeper to a rug shampooing device, comprising a combined brush journaling casing and dirt receiver adapted to be mounted V there being a lip adjacent the lower forward edge ward edges, and a rotary brush journaled in said portion having bristles engageable with said projections to flick moist dirt into said recesses, there being a lip adjacent one advance of the receptacle engageable by said bristles to cause the same to flick substantial quantities of dirt into said receptacle.

3. In combination with a vacuum sweeper of the brush type, means for readily and quickly converting said sweeper to a rug shampooing device, comprising a combined brush journaling casing and dirt receiver adapted to be mounted in the brush housing of the sweeper in place of the conventional brush, said casing having an elongated hollow portion and a rearwardly extending dirt receptacle communicating with said portion at its forward edge, a rotary brush journaled in said portion, there being a lip adjacent the lower forward edge of the receptacle engageable by the bristles of said brush to cause the same to flick substantial quantities of dirt into said receptacle, and a pulley on said brush to receive a belt for rotating the brush, said receptacle having partitions therein defining a front to rear space accommodating said beltand preventing lateral splashing of the same by dirt from the brush bristles.

of the receptacle engageable by the bristles of said brush to cause the same to flick substantial quantities of dirt into said receptacle, and means for removably attaching said casing interiorly of the sweeper brush housing to enable the casing to be readily removed for thorough flushing of the interior thereof. I

'7. The combination with a carriage, of a longitudinal brush casing having a downwardly facing brush chamber therein, the walls of which are provided with a plurality of internal longitudinal projections alternating with dirt receiv-' ing pockets, a driven rotary brush journaled in said chamber on an axis extending longitudinal- 1y of the casing, said projections extending par allel to the brush axis and being disposed so that the tips of the brush bristles engage therewith as the brush is rotated to produce a flipping dirt discharge action of the bristles discharging dirt therefrom to said pockets, and means operatively connected to said casing for generating copi- 4. A structure of the class described comprising a brush casing having an arcuate brush receiving chamber and a dirt receiving receptacle extending rearwardly of and communicating with said chamber, a brush rotatably journaled in said chamber, means for rotating the brush, said chamber having a longitudinally extending radial projection therein engageable by said brush in its rotation and a recess adjacent said projection to receive dirt flicked from the brush by said engagement, and means operatively connected to said casing for generating a quantity of suds and applying the same to the rug in advance of the brush.

5. A machine of the class described comprising a brush receiving casing, a brush rotatably journaled in said casing, said casing having projections extending radially of the brush axis and engageable by the brush bristles in the rotation thereof and having a plurality of radial recesses ous suds and discharging the same upon the surface to be cleaned in advance of the brush.

8. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination with a casing having a longitudinal brush chamber and a driven brush rotatably mounted in said chamber on an axis extending longitudinally thereof, said brush chamber having an internal projection extending longitudinally of the brush axis and projecting into the path of the ends of the brush bristles so that on rotation the brush bristles are engaged by the projections to facilitate the discharge 'of dirt therefrom, of means operatively connected to said casing to generate copious suds and discharge the same on the surface to be cleaned in advance of said brush.

9. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of a brush chamber having a rearwardly extending dirt receptacle opening thereto, and a driven brush rotatably mounted in said brush chamber, the walls of said brush chamber having internal elongated projections extending longitudinally of the brush axis and projecting into the path of the ends of portions of the brush bristles so that on rotation of the brush the bristles are engaged by the projections to facilitate the discharge of the dirt therefrom, one of said projections being disposed at the forward end of the bottom of said dirt receptacle.

10. In combination with a brush type vacuum sweeper having-a sweeper housing, a combined brush casing and dirt receiver adapted to be removably mounted in the brush housing of the sweeper upon removal of the sweeper brush therefrom, a rotary brush journaled in said casing provided with drive means coacting with drive means on said sweeper, said casing having an elongated hollow brush journaling portion provided with an internal projection engageable by the brush in the rotationthereof to flick dirt therefrom and with means for receiving dirt i0 flicked from the brush in the rotatiomoi' the brush in said casing, and means for removably attaching said casing interiorly of the sweeper brush housing to convert the sweeper to a rug shampooing device, while enabling the casing to be readily removed from said housing for flushing out the interior of the casing to remove dirt and the like therefrom.

11. In combination with a vacuum cleaner having a vacuum housing, a combined brush casing and dirt receiver adapted to be removably mounted in said housing or the cleaner,

CARL E. ERICKSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2706301 *Oct 24, 1949Apr 19, 1955Gango Philip ABrushing, cleaning, and scraping machines
US2910720 *Jun 22, 1954Nov 3, 1959Smith Philip PMachine for cleaning rugs and the like
US3041644 *Dec 9, 1959Jul 3, 1962American Waterlock CorpRug shampooing machine
US3061859 *Jul 17, 1959Nov 6, 1962Dubay Frank XRug scrubbing machine
US3178756 *May 13, 1963Apr 20, 1965Wayne Chemical CompanyFloor cleansing device
US3200433 *Jun 26, 1963Aug 17, 1965Electrolux CorpPower nozzle and rug scrubber
US3218657 *Jun 25, 1963Nov 23, 1965Sunbeam CorpFoam generator for rug scrubbing apparatus
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US3316579 *Jan 30, 1964May 2, 1967Signal Mfg CompanyApparatus for selectively polishing, scrubbing and cleaning floors
US3370315 *Jan 4, 1965Feb 27, 1968Scott & Fetzer CoRug cleaner attachment
US3436162 *Apr 11, 1967Apr 1, 1969Rewo Chem Fab GmbhApparatus for producing and discharging a foam of a liquid
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/320, D32/33, 15/48, 15/50.1
International ClassificationA47L5/22, A47L5/30, A47L11/32, A47L11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4069, A47L5/30, A47L11/4083, A47L11/325, A47L11/4013, A47L11/40, A47L11/4041
European ClassificationA47L11/40N2, A47L11/40J4, A47L11/40D, A47L11/40, A47L11/40F4, A47L11/32A, A47L5/30