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Publication numberUS2294118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 25, 1942
Filing dateJul 19, 1937
Priority dateJul 19, 1937
Publication numberUS 2294118 A, US 2294118A, US-A-2294118, US2294118 A, US2294118A
InventorsLeary Samuel W
Original AssigneeLeary Samuel W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for dispensing beverages
US 2294118 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

g- 1942- s. w. LEARY 2,294,118

APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING smvmmens Filed July 19, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 ITMIL'I INVENTOR. M Z WIemzy BY WW '%z.'sATTORNEY-S 8- 25, 1942- s. w. LEARY I APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING BEVERAGES I Filed July 19, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 XV OVUV AM/ e 1/ 9/ 1).

- INVENTOR.

5ml WjZfeaz y M %z ATTORNEYIS Aug. 25, 1942. s. w. LEARY APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING BEVERAGES Filed July 19, 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 y \s gn & ,2

ATTORNEY ,8

,//M 11 1 1 I, L A My w y 0 w :15; :.m m H 15% 1 r 1 1 1/ I 1 I 1 l N! iitiiitl: l 4 g Aug. 25, 1942. s. w. LEARY APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING BEVERAGES Filed July 19, 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 WZeavzy 1 IISATTORNEYS a; BY W Patented Aug. 25, 1942 uNiTeo STATES PATENT orrlcr.

APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING BEVERAGES Samuel W. Leary, Rochester, N. Application July 19, 1937, Serial No. 154,418

5 Claims.

The present invention relates to apparatus for cooling and dispensing liquids such, for example, as beverages of various kinds and particularly beer, ale, and the like.

One object of the invention is to provide in combination with a beverage dispensing bar, improved means for cooling or refrigerating beer, ale, and other beverages, which is so combined with the bar as to afford a unitary and compact structure and one in which common refrigerating means is provided for cooling both the bar and the beverage holding containers or receptacles as well as the tubes or pipes for delivering the beer to the dispensing faucets.

A further object of the invention is to provide in apparatus of this class, a combined serving counter and storage compartment affording in effect a single refrigerating unit, having space for articles of food, bottled beverages, and a series of barrels or other receptacles containing the beverages, together with pipes or tubes for delivering the beverage to the dispensing faucets.

A further object of the invention is to provide the receptacles with delivery pipes of glass or vitreous material for conveying the beer and other beverages therefrom through a single cooling chamber containing the receptacles to the dispensing faucets of the bar in order to avoid the deteriorating and displeasing effect upon the beer resulting from allowing it to stand for a considerable time in the usual metal pipes, employed for discharging it to the dispensing faucets as well as to avoid the loss made necessary from having to draw off and discard a considerable quantity of the beer after it has been allowed to remain Within the pipes over night.

A further object of the invention is to deliver the beer or other liquid through the refrigerating chamber of the serving counter to the dispensing faucets by means of transparent pipes and to provide a window or glass panel in one or more of the walls of the serving counter whereby to render the pipes and the liquid therein visible at all times, as well as to make it possible to view the interior of the storage compartment containing the beer barrels or other beverage holding receptacles, in order that inspection may be made by the customer or others to determine whether or not sanitary conditions are being maintained.

A further object of the invention is to provide in combination with front and back bars, a compartment below the level thereof for the barrels vor beverage holding receptacles and in which a unitary beverage cooling and dispensing bar of insulated construction, including an upper serving section and a combined storage and refrigerating section below the floor of the bar, as, for example, in a cellar beneath the same, the bar having one or more refrigerating chambers communicating with said compartment and the latter having a refrigerating unit associated therewith together with means for circulating the cold air therein and in said chambers for the purpose described.

A further object of the invention is to provide in combination with a beverage dispensing bar having a cooling chamber and a communicating refrigerating compartment beneath the same for beer barrels and other beverage containers. a series of liquid dispensing pipes connected with the barrels and extending therefrom through said compartment and said cooling chamber and each including a plurality of sections having flexible connections by which the sections may be disconnected and adjusted or deflected one relative to another to facilitate insertion of the lower sections through the bungs or bushings of the barrels, whereby to avoid having to so position the barrels with respect to the pipes as to accurately line up the openings of the bungs therewith.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved bung or bushing for the barrel through which to insert the beer delivery pipe and one having improved means for automatically closing the opening therein when the pipe is withdrawn from the barrel, and also improved means affording a sealed joint between'the tube and the bushing.

To these and other ends the invention resides in certain improvements and combinations of parts, all as will be hereinafter more fully described, the novel features being pointed out in the claims at the end of the specification.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary part sectional elevation illustrating one embodiment of the inven-- tion;

Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional elevation substantially on'line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary transverse sectional elevation drawn to an enlarged scale and taken on line 33 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional elevation drawn to an enlarged scale and taken substantially on line 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a horizontal section on line 55 of Fig. 4, drawn to an enlarged scale;

Fig. 6 is a sectional elevation taken through one of the barrels shown in Fig. 1, and, illustrating the method of connecting the beverage dispensing tubes with the barrels;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary longitudinal section through the lower portion of the tube, drawn to an enlarged scale;

Fig. 8 is a longitudinal section through the tube drawn to an enlarged scale and taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is a top plan view of a bung or bushing for the barrel shown in Fig. 6;

Fig. 10 is a section through the bushing taken on line l-l0 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 is a similar view showing the delivery tube and air supply pipe inserted in the openings of the bushing to which they correspond;

Fig. 12 is an inverted plan of the bushing shown in Fig. 9, removed from the head of the barrel;

Fig. 13 is a sectional view on line [3-23 of Fig. 12;

Fig. 14 is a similar view showing the beer delivery pipe inserted through the bushing and in position to displace the valve shown in Fig. 13, and

Fig. 15 is a detailed view of the valve and its supporting ring shown detached from the bushing.

The same reference numerals throughout t -e several views indicate the same parts.

Referring to the drawings I!) represents the floor and H certain of the side walls of a room containing the bar, the latter being designated generally by the reference numeral 12. Beneath the floor I0 is a cellar or basement :3, the floor of which is indicated at 13a, one or more of the side walls of the cellar being shown at M, Figs. 1 and 2. Supported by the floor l3a is a refrigerating compartment i having top and bottom walls l6 and H, side walls l8, and end walls [9, all formed of suitable insulating material for maintaining substantially uniform temperatures within the compartment, which constitutes a cooling chamber [5a, in open communication with thecooling chamber |2a of the upper or serving section [2 of the bar, the latter having front and rear walls 20 and 2| an upper horizontal wall 22, and also inner and outer end walls 20a. and 2|a, respectively, each formed of suitable insulating material.

The compartment I5 is provided with a door l9a in one of its end walls for closing and opening, provided to render the compartment accessible and through which the beer barrels 23 or other beverage holding containers or receptacles may be inserted and removed from time to time.

A back bar is shown in Fig. 2, designated generally by the reference numeral 25 and has a cooling. chamber 26 in open communication with the cooling or refrigerating chamber Ilia of the compartment 15. The walls of the back bar, including the door 21, are formed of suitable insulating material. The cooling or. refrigerating chamber 26 is provided with a plurality of shelves 28 for supporting bottled beverages, dishes, and other articles as well.

The front wall of the serving counter i2 is provided with a window or transparent panel 29 preferably formed of a plurality of sheets of glass having insulating spaces 29a therebetween to prevent fogging of the glass, whereby to render the interior of the compartment I211 and the barrels therein visible. Suitably secured within said compartment are a plurality of shelves 39 for supporting the beverage containing bottles 3| or other articles which it may be desired to place within the compartment and which can be readily viewed through the window 29. The compartment l2a, is also provided with a door 32 for closing an opening through which to insert the articles to be placed upon the shelves 30. By providing the transparent panel or window 29, bottled beverages of various kinds and other articles as Well may be displayed to advantage within the refrigerating compartment lZa from time to time.

An important feature of the invention resides in the manner of constructing and arranging the pipes or conduits for conveying the beer from the barrels 23 to the dispensing faucets 33. The pipes are formed of glass or vitreous material for a purpose more fully described hereinafter, it being understood that any desired number of the pipes may be provided, depending on the number of the barrels or beverage holding receptacles to be used, five being shown in the present installation.

Owing to the fact that it is desirable to locate the dispensing faucets for the various pipes relatively close together, it is necessary to offset the opposite ends of each of a majority of the pipes, as shown in Fig. 1, and it is preferred to form each pipe of separate sections and to connect the sections by means of flexible or resilient couplings to permit one to be deflected relative to another in order to avoid having to so position the barrels as to accurately aline the openings of the bungs with the lower sections of the pipes. Furthermore the sections are so constructed as to permit one to be readily disconnected from another in order that the lower section may be removed from the barrel when it is desired to substitute a full barrel for an empty one. The lower sections of the pipes are designated generally by the reference numeral 34, and the couplings for connecting them with the upper or intermediate sections by the reference numeral 35, these parts being the same in each case, for which reason a description of one will sufiice for all. The construction of the delivery pipes and the manner of connecting them with the barrels is best shown in Figs. 6, 7, and 8.

Each of the pipes, with the exception of the second from the left in Fig. 1 includes in addition to the inner sections 34, an intermediate section 36 and an outer section 31, the intermediate and outer sections being connected by couplings, as shown in Fig. 1, which are of similar construction except where they differ in length, the two short couplings being indicated at 35a, and the next in length at 35b, and the longest at 35c. It will be further understood that the couplings connecting the outer and intermediate sections of the pipes are the same as the couplings 35, except in cases where they are of different lengths. The inner or lower section 34 of the second pipe from the left of Fig. 1 has only one upper section connected therewith which is also designated by the reference numeral 31. Furthermore, the lower sections 34 of the pipes are provided with similarly constructed valves 38 for controlling the flow of the liquid through the pipes. The lower sections 34 of the pipes each includes upper and lower glass tubes 39 and 40, respectively, which are separated by and suitably connected with the valve 38 by similarly constructed packing nuts 4| screwed on the threaded portions 38a of the valve between which and the end wall of the nut is a gasket 41a formed of rubber or other suitable material. It will be understood that by tightening up the nuts 4| that the gaskets will be compressed and made to tightly grip the glass tubes without danger of breaking the same, but under suflicient pressure to firmly secure the tubes in position upon the body of the valve and at the same time affording a liquid-tight joint between the tube and the valve body. The packing nuts are each preferably provided with an elongated sleeve-like portion Mbwhich is spaced slightly from the tube and which serves to prevent swinging of the latter about its point of connection with the nut 4|. The joints between the opposing ends of the tubes and the valve 38 are each sealed by a washer 38b formed of rubber or other suitable material, the washers being disposed within the threaded portions 38a of the valve, as shown in Fig. 7. i

The sections 40 of the glass tubes which are extended through the bungs 24 are provided. with inlet openings 40a, as shown in Figs. 6 and 7 through which the beverage enters the pipes for discharge to the faucets under pressure of air or gas in the barrel which is delivered thereto through a supply hose or tube 24a connected with a suitable supply source, not shown.

The lower couplings, designated generally by the reference numeral 35, serve to connect the glass tubes 36 and 39 as best shown in Fig. 8. Each of the couplings comprises a short glass tube 42, the opposite ends of which are each extended within a packing nut having inner and outer sections 43 and 44, respectively, the latter being threaded within the former, as shown in Fig. 8. The opposite ends of the glass tube 52 are beaded, as shown at 42a, the beaded portions being each seated on a ring 45 screwed within the section 43 of the packing nut. The opposing ends of the glass tubes 35 and 39 are extended through the packing nuts and each is surrounded by inner and outer gaskets 45 and 41, respectively. The gaskets are formed of rubber or other suitable material and are interposed between the outer member 44 of the packing nut and the opposing end of the glass tube 42 on which end the gasket 45 is seated. By screwing down the section 44 of the packing nut the rubber gaskets 5 and 31 will be compressed and made to tightly grip the glass tubes whereby they will be properly held against longitudinal movement one relative to another. However, due to the resiliency of the gaskets the tubes may be readily deflected one relative to another and relative to the couplings, as indicated by the position of the tube 39 shown in Fig. 8. Since this is true, it will be seen that all of the couplings shown in Fig. 1 are provided with sufliciently flexible joints to make it unnecessary to have to so position the barrels as to exactly aline the openings in the bungs thereof with the lower portions of the delivery pipes. In other words, the flexibility of the joints of the pipes is sufficient to permit of an approximate alinement of the bungs of the barrels with the pipes whereby to avoid the necessity of having to take the time and trouble to place the barrels exactly in the same position each time it becomes necessary to substitute new barrels for those from which the beer has been drawn.

A further advantage in the provision of the flexible couplings is to prevent breaking of the glass tubes in case pressure is applied to one, accidentally or otherwise in a direction tending to deflect it out of alinement with another. Since the several couplings shown in Fig. l vary only in length and since the construction of each is substantially the same as that shown in Fig. 8, it is deemed unnecessary to further describe the details, of the same.

The upper glass sections 31 of the pipes have their outer ends 31a extended through and disposed at right angles to the rear wall 2| of the counter or serving section of the bar, as shown in Fig. 5, said ends each being disposed in a short pipe section 48 also extended through said wall. The pipe section is secured in position within said wall by the inner and outer nuts 49 and 5!] which are screwed upon said pipe section and in engagement with the opposite faces of the wall, as shown in Fig. 5. The glass tube is resiliently supported on the inner end of said pipe section by a rubber gasket 5| carried by a nut 52 threaded on said section which serves to clamp the gasket thereon.

Screwed on the outer end of the pipe section 48 is the dispensing faucet 33 which carries a resilient packing ring 53 surrounding the outer end of the glass tube and seated on the end of the pipe section 48. The tube is beaded at 54 and is held against withdrawal from the pipe section by engagement of the bead with the resilient gasket 53. A set screw 55 serves to hold the faucet in position upon the inner section 48. Below the faucets 33 is a shelf 55 for the drinking glasses or other receptacles which it may be desired to place thereon.

The outer glass tubes 31 of the delivery pipes are placed relatively close together, as previously stated, and directly opposite the same the front wall of the bar is provided with a window 51 preferably formed of a plurality of glass plates having insulating spaces 51a therebetween which serve to prevent fogging of the glass.

A similar window 58 is provided in the top wall of the bar directly over the outlet ends of the delivery pipes, as shown in Figs. 1 and 4, said window having a plurality of sheets of glass separated by insulating spaces 58a, which also serve to prevent fogging of the glass.

It will be understood that the interior of the refrigerating compartment and the barrels and pipes therein may be readily viewed by looking downwardly through the windows 29, 51, and 58 whereby the customer may be informed as to the sanitary conditions of the compartment containing the beverage holding receptacles.

One of the important features of the invention is the use of the glass tubes or pipes for discharging beer, ale, and other beverages from the barrels or kegs to the dispensing faucets. Not only are the glass tubes more sanitary than the usual metal or block tin tubes or coils through which the beer is discharged to the faucets, but they also make it possible to avoid the waste resulting from having to draw off the beer remaining in the metal tubes over night, due to the deteriorating and displeasing effect of the latter on the beer when it is allowed to stand therein for any length of time. However, where glass tubes are used the beer remains fresh and palatable even when retained within the tubes for a considerable period of time, especially when the tubes are disposed within a cooling chamber as in the present disclosure. Furthermore, it has been found that the cost of the beer which it becomes necessary to discard when the usual metal pipes or coils are installed is very considerable over a period of time. However with the use of glass tubes the loss by wastage is reduced to a minimum and a consequent saving is effected.

Another advantage of the use of las ery tubes is that the beverage ther in in i ge readlly viewed by the customer through the windows 5"! and 58, provided in the front and upper horizontal walls of the serving counter and the tubes inspected from time to time by the attendant to' determine whether or not the tubes have become discolored or stained to such an extent as to make it advisable to wash them out by forcing a suitable cleaning agent therethrough.

Any suitable refrigerating means may be provided for cooling the compartment containing the beer holding receptacles and the refrigerating chambers of the front and back bars communicating therewith. The means provided for this purpose in the present disclosure comprises a cooling coil 6| disposed in an open ended frame or casing 82 suitably secured within the cooling chamber |5a of the compartment l5, preferably adjacent one end thereof, as shown in Fig. 1. The coil is connected by means of the pipes 63 and 64 with a suitable refrigerating unit 65 of any well known type adapted for circulating a refrigerant through the coil. In order to properly distribute the air cooled by the coil 8|, a fan 66 is disposed at one end of the casing 82 containing the coil, the fan being connected with and adapted to be rotated by an electric motor 67 to force the air from the casing into the cooling chamber l5a.

In order to insure proper circulation of the air within the chambers of the front and back bars, an outwardly and upwardly inclined deflecting plate 68 is disposed at the bottom of the casing 62 which serves to direct a considerable portion of the air discharging from the casing upwardly within said chambers, which are at all times in open communication with the barrel holding chamber I50.

The new and novel construction of the bung for the barrel and associated parts, is shown in Figs. 9 to inclusive. The bung, designated generally by the reference numeral 24, comprises a threaded disk screwed into the head 23a of the barrel, as shown in Fig. 6. The disk is provided with an opening 69 terminating at its inner end in an inwardly and downwardly inclined seat or shoulder 19 upon which is disposed the correspondingly tapered portion ll of a valve supporting member 12, the latter being extended slightly below the disk 24, as shown in Fig. 10. The supporting member 72 is provided with a tapered opening 14 within which a portion of a ball-shaped valve 15 projects for closing the bung opening through which the glass tube 48 is inserted and withdrawn from the barrel. The valve is supported by an arm 16 loosely connected with the valve by a screw '51 threaded within the valve and extended through an opening in the arm of slightly larger diameter than that of the screw, as shown in Fig. 13. The arm is pivotally connected at 18 with a bracket 19 suitably secured upon the supporting member 72. A U-shaped spring 89 has its middle portion extended under the arm 76 and its end portions wound upon the ends of the pivot member 18, as shown in Fig. 12. The spring tends at all times to urge the valve upon its seat 73, but when the glass tube 49 is moved downwardly through the opening in the bung, the valve will be displaced, as shown in Fig. 14. As soon, however, as the tube 48 is withdrawn from the barre] the spring will automatically return the latter to normal closing position, as shown in Fig. 13.

The glass tube 40 is yieldingly supported within the barrel by a rubber gasket or packing ring 8| seated on the supporting member 12 upon which it is clamped by a nut 82 threaded within the disk 24, as shown in Fig. 14. By screwing down the nut the rubber gasket will be made to tightly grip the tube 48 whereby to prevent escape of the air or gas from the barrel supplied by the tube 24a to provide pressure for discharging the beer upwardly through the delivery pipes to the faucets. The nut 82 is recessed at 83 for the reception of. a wrench or suitable tool for operating the same. The rubber gasket 8| is resilient enough to permit the valve to efiect a tight closure of the bung opening when the valve is in engagement with its seat 13 formed on the lower face of the gasket 8|.

The disk 24 is provided with an opening 84 for the reception of the air supply tube 24a, the opening being normally closed by a valve 85 supported within a casing 86 and normally held in closed position by a spring 81, the inner end of which is seated upon a screw cap 88 detachably connected with the casing. The valve seat is formed on a rubber gasket 89 held in position upon the casing 86 by a nut 9|] threaded within the disk 24, as shown in Fig. 10, the nut having slots 9| for the reception of a suitable tool for applying and removing the nut. The valve casing 86 has an outwardly flared portion 86a at its upper end which is seated on a correspondingly shaped shoulder 86b of the disk 24.

The free end of the air supply pipe 24a is of a size to afiord a relatively close fit within the gasket 89 when inserted therein, as shown in Fig. 11, whereby to prevent escape of the air from the barrel. Upon withdrawing the pipe from the opening 84, the spring 81 will automatically move the valve to closed position, as shown in Fig. 10. The disk 24 is provided with openings 92 in its outer face for the reception of a spanner wrench or other suitable tool for applying the disk to and removing it from the head 23a of the barrel.

When it is desired to remove the glass tubes 48 from the barrels after the latter have been emptied, the nut 82 of the bung will be loosened to relieve the pressure on the gasket 8|, after which the nut 44 at the lower end of the coupling 35 may be loosened to relieve the pressure of the gaskets 46 and 41 on the tube 39, following which the nut 4| above the valve 38 may be unscrewed from the latter to free the tube 39 for movement upwardly within the tube 42 of the coupling 35 far enough to clear the upper threaded portion 38a of the valve. The empty barrel can then be removed and the tube 48 withdrawn therefrom and inserted in a full barrel. When the barrel has been properly placed with respect to the delivery pipe, the tube 39 can be moved downwardly to position its lower end within the upper threaded portion of the valve 38, after which the nut 4| can be screwed down into position, as shown in Fig. 7. Then by tightening up the nut 44 on the lower end of the coupling 35, the packing rings 46 and 41 will again be made to grip the tube 39 to properly secure it in aoosition relative to the tube 42 of the coupling An important feature of the invention is the valve unit and associated parts of the bung or bushing shown in Figs. 9 to 14, inclusive. In this construction the unit comprising the valve supporting member 72, the valve thereon, and the enclosing means for the valve can be inserted within the opening 69 of the disk 24 and positioned on the tapered seat 10 of the disk as shown in Fig. 13. The packing ring 8| for supporting the tube 40 can then be positioned within the opening upon the upper face of the supporting member ill, after which the ring nut 82 can be applied and left slightly spaced from the packing ring. The tube 40 can then be inserted through the opening and downwardly'within the barrel to the position shown in Fig. 6, after which the ring nut 82 will be screwed down to cause the packing ring to spread and firmly grip and hold the tube in the desired position, the packing ring at the same time serving to seal the joint against the escape of the air or gas delivered to the barrel for exerting pressure on the liquid to effect discharge of the same when the faucet is open. It will be seen that the packing ring 8| not only serves as a supporting element for the pipe but as a means for holding the supporting member 12 of the valve unit in position upon its seat 10.

It will be understood that the upper wall 16 of the compartment a, Fig. 2, may, if desired, be used as a platform for the attendant of the bar, or as supporting means for a floor mat or covering on which to stand.

It will also be understood that the valve 85 operates to exclude the beer from access to the air supply line valve seating member of rubber, or the like, which in the old types of beer dispensing apparatus becomes foul and contaminates the beer. In the present construction the beer is prevented from coming in contact with the rubber valve seating member 89 by the valve 85 and also because of the air pressure maintained in the barrel for the purpose of discharging the beer therefrom.

By providing glass supply tubes for delivering the beer to the dispensing faucets the barrels may be used for several weeks, whereas the metal pipes heretofore used contaminate the beer withing a few days. Furthermore the glass tubes will remain clean for many months and the beer will not be adversely affected thereby.

I claim:

1. In apparatus of the class described, a beverage holding receptacle having an opening in one of its walls through which to insert a delivery tube, said opening terminating at its inner end in an inwardly and downwardly inclined shoulder, a supporting ring having a correspondingly tapered portion seated on said shoulder and also having a valve seat, a flexible packing ring seated on the outer face of said supporting ring, a clamping ring secured within said opening and serving to clamp the packing ring on said supporting ring, the opening in said packing ring being smaller than the openings in said clamping and supporting rings, and a valve associated with said supporting ring and having means for automatically moving the same to closed position on said seat upon withdrawal of the discharge tube from the receptacle, said valve being displaced by said tube upon moving it through said rings into the re ceptacle.

2. In a beverage cooling and dispensing bar wherein a dispensing faucet is provided and wherein a chamber is provided for storing a beverage holding receptacle, a discharge conduit one end of which is disposed within the receptacle and the other end of which is connected to the dispensing faucet, said conduit being substantially entirely of glass and being made up of at least two rigid glass sections, one of said glass sections having one end extending into the receptacle and the other end extending rigidly in an upward direction and protruding from the receptacle, one of said glass sections being of substantially twice the internal diameter of the other whereby the second of said rigid glass sections and the protruding end of the first glass section may be telescoped with respect to each other, and means including flexible packing for securing said sections together in fluid tight communication, said means enabling the sections to be assembled in fluid tight communication when the sections are out of axial alinement.

3. In a beverage cooling'and dispensing bar wherein a dispensing faucet is provided and wherein a chamber is provided for storing a beverage holding receptacle, a discharge conduit one end of which is disposed within the receptacle and the other end of which is connected to the dispensing faucet, said conduit being substantially entirely of glass and being made up of at least three rigid glass sections, two of said sections being of substantially the same diameter while the third of said sections is of substantially twice said diameter to enable the three sections to be assembled together to form a continuous conduit with the ends of adjacent sections in telescopic relation, and means between the telescoping parts of adjacent sections for enabling the sections to be assembled in fluid tight communication when the sections are out of alinement with each other.

4. In a beverage cooling and dispensing bar wherein a dispensing faucet is provided and wherein a chamber is provided for storing a beverage holding receptacle, a discharge conduit one end of which is disposed within the receptacle and the other end of which is connected to the dispensing faucet, said conduit being substantially entirely of glass and being made up of at least two rigid glass sections of different diameters, the internal diameter of one section being substantially twice that of the other section, one of said glass sections having one end extending into the receptacle and the other end extending rigidly in an upward direction and protruding from the receptacle and means for connecting the second of said rigid glass sections in telescopic relation with the protruding end of the first glass section, said means including a flexible connection between the sections enabling the sections to be assembled in fluid tight communication when out of axial alinement.

5. In a beverage dispensing system, a beverage holding receptacle having a bung opening, a bushing in said opening comprising upper and lower rings, the lower of said rings being seated securely in a portion of the bung opening, a flexible annular packing element between said upper and lower rings, a delivery conduit for the beverage, an inwardly opening valve associated with the bushing, means normally urging said valve toward closed position into engagement with the lower of said rings, said delivery conduit upon being inserted in said bushing and moved toward the bottom of the receptacle opening said valve, the inner diameter of said rings being larger than that of the packing element so that a seal is effected between the packing element and the delivery conduit without the delivery conduit engaging the rings, and the upper of said rings being rotatable when the parts are in the bung opening to compress the packing element between said rings.

SAMUEL W. LEARY,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2592848 *Sep 30, 1948Apr 15, 1952Cee Kleer Products IncSight glass fitting for piping systems
US2628009 *Sep 15, 1947Feb 10, 1953Idzi Edward DTap box
US4440319 *Jul 21, 1981Apr 3, 1984Nitchman Harold LSystem, apparatus, and method of dispensing a liquid from a semi-bulk disposable container
US4491247 *Apr 2, 1982Jan 1, 1985Nitchman Harold LSystem, apparatus, and method of dispensing a liquid from a semi-bulk disposable container
US4531656 *Apr 22, 1983Jul 30, 1985Nitchman Harold LSystem, apparatus and method of dispensing a liquid from disposable container and a container therefor
US4621841 *Sep 23, 1985Nov 11, 1986Corning LimitedTubular coupler with retainer
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/173, 285/115, 251/149.2, 285/206, 285/193, 285/238, 285/356, 285/346, 285/231, 285/353
International ClassificationB67D1/06, B67D1/00, F25D31/00, B67D1/08
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/08, F25D31/002, B67D1/06
European ClassificationB67D1/08, F25D31/00C, B67D1/06