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Publication numberUS2294131 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 25, 1942
Filing dateJul 30, 1941
Priority dateJul 30, 1941
Publication numberUS 2294131 A, US 2294131A, US-A-2294131, US2294131 A, US2294131A
InventorsAlbert R Raymond
Original AssigneeSherwin Williams Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Color exhibiting device
US 2294131 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

g- 25, 1942- R. RAYMOND 2,294,131

COLOR EXHIBITIIIG DEVICE Filed July 30. 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR,

A; 5557 5/54 r/vonu ATTORNEYS Patented Aug. 25, 1942 cocoa mmmrrmo nnvrca Albert R. Raymond, Chicago, 111., assignor to The Sherwin-Williams Company, Cleveland, Ohio,

a corporation of Ohio Application July 30, 1941, Serial No. 404,632

6 Claims. (Cl. 35-43) This invention relates to a color exhibiting device, and its principal object aims to provide an improved device of this kind with which different colors for the walls and ceiling of a room can be displayed in such a manner that the colors are represented as having been applied to such walls and ceiling and are also represented in association with furniture, drapes, or other furnishings which might be used in the room.

Another object of my invention is to provide an improved device of this kind in which a transparent section having room outlines and furnishings represented thereon in opaque materials overlies a sheet on which color cards may be interchangeably arranged for association with the different room portions and furnishings, and,

in which means is provided for locating and arranging the color cards with respect to such room portions and furnishings and for indicating the sequence in which the color cards are to be arranged.

Still another object of my invention is to provide an improved color exhibiting device of this character in which the opaque representations of the room portions and furnishings on the transparent sheet will overlie and conceal the meetthe portions of the adjacent color cards.

The invention maybe further briefly summarized as consisting in certain novel combinations and arrangement of parts hereinafter described and particularly set out in the appended claims. y

In the accompanying sheets of drawings:

Fig. l is a plan view showing a color exhibiting device of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the device showing the same opened and with the color cards in place;

Fig. 3 is a, partial plan view of the lower sheet or back of the device showing the same with the color cards removed therefrom;

Fig. 4 is a detached perspective view of one of the color cards; and

Fig. 5 is a partial sectional view taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 2.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawings I show my color exhibiting device as comprising a pair of sheets l0 and II provided respectively with a transparent or partially transparent section or area l2 and a group or arrangement of color cards l3. The sheets Ill and H are adapted to be arranged in superposed relation so that the transparent section I! will overlie the group of color cards. The sheets may be separate sheets of relatively stiff material such as cardboard or the like, or preferably as shown in this instance, may be sheets of such material connected together along a common edge I to provide a folder of which the sheet I forms the front and the sheet H forms the back. When the sheets are brought into superposed relation, as by closing the folder, and the transparent section I! overlies the group of color cards l3, portions of the cards will be visible through the transparent section and, as will be explained more in detail hereinafter, the walls, articles or furnishings represented on the transparent section will realistically appear to be of the color of the color cards located thereunder.

As shown in Fig. l, the transparent section P2 of the upper sheet I may have a picture of a room represented thereon by means of outlines or areas l5 printed or drawn in substantially opaque coating material so as to outline or represent portions of the floor, walls, and ceiling of a room viewed in perspective with one or more of the surfaces thereof being represented as lying in a plane or planes oblique to the plane of the picture. The transparent section l2 may also have various room furnishings or furniture printed or drawn thereon in perspective with substantially opaque coating material and arranged to appear as furnishings or furniture being used in the room which is represented.

In the room which is represented in the exhibiting device illustrated in Fig. 1, all the visible areas of the wall portions H and the floor and ceiling portions 88 and IQ for which colors are to be selected are left transparent, and the representations of the border or molding I511, the picture 20 and the window blinds 2!, which are also printed or drawn in opaque coating material. The furnishings and furniture represented inthe room will depend upon the particular kind of room being illustrated; in this instance the room represented is a dining room, and the furnishings may include a table 22, chairs 23 and window drapes 24. These furnishings may be drawn or printed more or less solidly in opaque materials, but preferably such articles or portions thereof as might suitably be finished in materials and/or colors selected to conform to the color scheme for the room as a whole are left transparent. In the case of the chairs 23, the legs and framework, for example, may be represented in opaque coating material, and the sections 26 representing the upholstered chair seats may be left transparent. The arrangement of the coated and uncoated areas is best illustrated in Fig. 2.

The coating material used to outline or represent the room portions and room furnishings may be in various colors corresponding with or more naturally representing, such room portions and furnishings; for example, the border section I511 and the window blinds 2| may be represented on the transparent area with opaque white coating material outlined or supplemented by lines drawn or printed in black or some other desired color, and the solid portions of the areas representing the table and chairs may be in opaque brown or other colors corresponding appropriately with the colors usually found in furniture and may also be outlined or supplemented by lines drawn or printed in black. The coating materials may be applied to either side of the transparent section l2 but are preferably applied to the back or under side thereof. Shading or lighting effects, giving the furniture or furnishings a more realistic appearance, may be produced by applying one coating material over another so that portions of the second coating will show through at the desired points of the first coating.

The color cards l3 may comprise a number of relatively small individual cards, each representing or exhibiting a different color or shade. As here shown, the cards may be rectangular and may all be of the same size and shape so that they can be conveniently handled and can be readily accommodated in a suitable file from which they can be selected as desired. When the color cards have been appropriately arranged on the lower sheet or back ll the sheet I is folded or laid thereover so that portions of the color cards will be visible through the remaining clear or transparent portions of the section II, and the cards, the locating means provided on the sheet I I may also include instructions or indications 29 identifying the individual cards with respect to the room portions or furnishings to which they are to supply their colors. These instructions or indications 29 may consist in an identifying word or expression such as the words floor," chair covering, drapes, or the like, and may also include sequence designations such as first," second," third," etc. The color cards may be connected with the sheet II by providing the sheet with slits or openings 30 into which comer portions of the cards may be inserted for holding the cards in position on the sheet. .As indicated in Fig. 4 of the drawings, the color cards may have one or more perforations adjacent one end thereof. These perforations enable the color I cards to be retained in a suitable filing device.

cards will provide the different colors desired for the room portions and furnishings, and the device, as seen in Fig. 1, will exhibit the different colors in a very realistic manner.

There are five color cards in the exhibiting device shown in this instance but a larger or smaller number of cards could be used. These cards may include a. card I311, which in this mstance is red or rose-colored and supplies the c-l-lor for the floor l8 and gives the appearance of a correspondingly colored carpet or covering on the floor. The color card 13b, which may be of a brown color, will supply the color for the chair coverings 26. The card 130, which is here represented as being blue, supplies the color for the window drapes 24. The card I311, which is represented as being green, will supply the color for the wall portions [1. The color for the celling portion [9 is supplied by the color card l3e, which in this instance is represented as being yellow.

It is important that the color cards I3 be properly arranged or located on the lower sheet or back H so that only the desired or needed portions of the color-cards will be visible through the transparent portions of the section I2 and the unused portions will be covered and concealed either by the cards themselves or by the opaque portions. It is also important that the arrangement of the cards be such that the meeting or adjoining portions of adjacent cards lie under the opaque lines or designations of the section I2 and be concealed thereby. To this end I provide the sheet II with means for arranging or locating the color cards in proper position thereon and for placing the color cards thereon in proper sequence so that unused portions of certain cards may underli and be concealed by portions of other cards as mentioned above. As shown in Fig. 3, this locating means may include outlines 28 printed on the sheet II to correspond substantially in size and shape with the color cards. The outlines 28 are printed on the sheet II in the same arrangement as that which the color cards are to have in the finished group, and those portions of the printed outlines which represent underlying portions of the color cards are printed in dotted or broken lines as represented at 28a.

When the display device is being prepared for use, a set of color cards is selected to provide the colors desired for the different room portions and furnishings, and these cards are then arranged on the sheet or back II by following the indications or designations appearing on such sheet. The cards selected for the furniture or furnishings may be those which correspond with the actual colors of existing furniture or furnishings and the cards for the floor, walls and ceiling may represent arbitrary colors being investigated for use with such furniture or furnishings. In keeping with the indications or designations of the sheet II, the card l3a for thefloor or fioor covering would be applied first; and the cards corresponding with the chair coverings, drapes, walls, and ceiling would be applied in succession in the order named. The color cards can be rearranged as desired on the sheet II, or other color cards can be substituted until the desired color combinations have been selected.

From the foregoing description and the accompanying drawings it will now be readily understood that I have provided an improved color exhibiting device with which diiferent colors can be readily exhibited and compared in a relative arrangement corresponding with that which would actually exist if the colors were used in a room and with furniture or room furnishings. While I have illustrated and described my improved color exhibiting device in more or less detail, it will be understood. of course, that my invention is not to be regarded as limited to the particular details and arrangement herein disclosed, but includes such modifications and variations as come within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A device for exhibiting a picture of a room in a plurality of selected surface finishes, said device comprising a front sheet and a back sheet adapted to be brought into superposed relation, said front sheet having a transparent section upon which the room is depicted in perspective with substantially opaque coating material, said coating material being applied so as to leave substantially entirely uncoated the visible areas of surfaces for which surface finishes are to be selected, at least one of said surfaces being represented as lying in a plane oblique to the plane of the picture, and a plurality of card holding means on said back sheet for interchangeably positioning thereon in predetermined sequence and partially overlapping relation a plurality of selected cards having different surface appearances, said card hold- .ing means being located with respect to the un- In addi i n to the Outlines 28 f r the lor coated areas and adjacent coated areas so that,

when the selected cards are held and positioned by said card holding means and said front sheet is superposed on said back sheet, said selected cards are visible throughout, but only through, the transparent areas for which they are respectively selected.

2. A device for exhibiting a picture of a room in a plurality of selected surface finishes, said device comprising a front sheet and a back sheet adapted to be brought into superposed relation, said front sheet having a transparent section upon which the room isdepicted in perspective with substantially opaque coating material, said coating material being applied so as to leave substantially entirely uncoated the visible areas of surfaces for which surface finishes are to be selected, at least one of said surfaces being represented as'lying in a plane oblique to the plane of the picture, and a plurality of card holdin means on said back sheet for interchangeably positioning thereon in predetermined sequence and partially overlapping relation a plurality of selected cards having differing surface appearances, said card holding means being located with respect to the uncoated areas and adjacent coated areas so that, when the selected cards are held and positioned by said card holding means and said front sheet is superposed onsaid back sheet, all lines of demarcation between the finishes of the selected cards are concealed by overlying opaque coating material and the selected cards are visible throughout, but only through, the

transparent areas for which they are respectively selected.

3. A device for exhibiting a picture of a room and its furnishings in a plurality of selected surface finishes, said device comprising a front sheet and a back sheet adapted to be brought into superpredetermined sequence and partially overlapping relation a plurality of selected cards having differing surface appearances, said card holding means being located with respect to the uncoated areas and adjacent coated areas so that, when the selected cards are held and positioned by said card holding means and said front sheet is superposed on said back sheet, said selected cards are visible throughout, but only through, the transparent areas for which they are respectively selected.

4. A device for exhibiting a picture of a room and its furnishings in a plurality of selected sur-' face finishes, said device comprising a front sheet.

and a back sheet adapted to be brought into superposed relation, said front sheet having a transparent section upon which the room and furnishings are depicted in perspective with substantially opaque coating material, said coating material being applied so as to leave substantially entirely uncoated the visible areas of surfaces for which surface finishes are to be selected, at least one of said finishes being represented as lying in a plane oblique to the plane of the picture, and a plurality of card holding means on said back sheet for interchangeably positioning thereon in predetermined sequence and partially overlapping relation a plurality of selected cards having differing surface appearances, said card holding means being located with respect to the uncoated areas and adjacent coated areas so that, when the selected cards are held'and positioned by said card holding means and said front sheet is superposed on said back sheet, all lines of demarcation between the finishes of the selected cards are concealed by overlying opaque coating material and the selected cards are visible.

throughout, but only through, the transparent areas for which they are respectively selected.

5. A device for exhibitinga picture of a room in a plurality of selected surface finishes, said device comprising 'a front sheet and a back sheet, adapted to bebrought into superposed relation,

said front sheet having a transparent section upon which the room is depicted in perspective with substantially opaque coating material, said coating material being applied so as to leave substantially entirely uncoated the visible areas of surfaces for which surface finishes are to be selected, at least one of saidsurfaces being represented as lying in a plane oblique to the plane of the picture, a supply of individual cards having differing surface appearances, and a plurality of card holding means on said back sheet for inter changeably positioning thereon in predetermined 7 sequence and partially overlapping relation a plurality of selected cards having differing surface appearances, said card holding means being located with respect to the uncoated areas and'adjacent coated areas so that, when the selected cards are held and positioned by said card holding means and said front sheet is superposed on said back sheet, said selected cards are visible throughout, but only through, the transparent areas for which they are respectively selected.

6. A device for exhibiting a picture of a room in a plurality of selected surface finishes, said de-' vice comprising a front sheet and a back sheet adapted to be brought into superposed relation, said front sheet having a transparent section upon which the room is depicted in perspective with substantially opaque coating material, said coating material being applied so as to leave substantially entirely uncoated the visible areas of surfaces for which surface finishes are to be selected, at least one of said surfaces being represented as lying in a plane oblique to the plane of the picture, a supply of individual cards having differing surface appearances, a plurality of card holding means on said back sheet for interehangeably positioning thereon in predetermined sequence and partially overlapping relation a plurality of selected cards having difiering surface appearances, said card holding means being located with respect to the uncoated areas and adjacent coated areas so that, when the selected cards are held and positioned by said card holding means and said front sheet is superposedon said back sheet, all lines of demarcation between the finishes of the selected cards are concealed by overlying opaquecoating material and the selected cards are visible throughout, but only through, the transparent areas for which they are respectively selected, and indicia on said back sheet adjacent said card holding means for indicating both the sequence in which the selected cards are to be applied and the portion of the room on which the surface finish of each of the selected cards will appear.

ALBERT R. RAYMOND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2479052 *May 5, 1947Aug 16, 1949Waliace Pauline EEducational cutout doll dressing toy
US2481672 *Sep 26, 1945Sep 13, 1949Benjamin W WaldieColor exhibiting device
US2519922 *Sep 25, 1945Aug 22, 1950Edward NewburyEducational and display device
US2890531 *Apr 19, 1956Jun 16, 1959Gracier Charles WWall and floor covering sample display device
US4106221 *Feb 2, 1977Aug 15, 1978Michael David SelonTwo-dimensional visualization aid for the retail jewelry trade
US4321037 *Oct 9, 1980Mar 23, 1982Miller Melvin LMethod of illustrating how the outside of a building will appear to the viewer if a building material is added to the outside of the building
US4830619 *Jan 27, 1988May 16, 1989The Conde Nast Publications Inc.Table setting display guide
US5106305 *Dec 28, 1988Apr 21, 1992Michael GrantPicture making kit
US5601431 *May 3, 1995Feb 11, 1997Howard; CherylInterior design system and method
US5743407 *Nov 29, 1995Apr 28, 1998Williams; MarthaColor reference system for decorators
US5803739 *May 12, 1997Sep 8, 1998Hitchcock; SherryTotal environment decorating aid
US8678825 *Dec 10, 2009Mar 25, 2014Paul MutimearDisplay device
US20070298382 *Jun 6, 2007Dec 27, 2007Schilling Lee HVirtual textile samples and displays
US20110306021 *Dec 10, 2009Dec 15, 2011Paul MutimearDisplay device
DE1138666B *Mar 4, 1958Oct 25, 1962Werbetechnik Hermann Bruder KMusterbuch fuer Farbvergleiche
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/79
International ClassificationG01J3/52
Cooperative ClassificationG01J3/526
European ClassificationG01J3/52D