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Publication numberUS2295006 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1942
Filing dateMar 4, 1940
Priority dateMar 4, 1940
Publication numberUS 2295006 A, US 2295006A, US-A-2295006, US2295006 A, US2295006A
InventorsHerman B Philips
Original AssigneeHerman B Philips
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Invalid support
US 2295006 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 8, 1942. H. B. PHILIPS INVALID SUPPORT 4 Sheets-Shet l Filed March 4, 1940 ATTORNEY Sept. 8, 1942. H. B. PHILIPS INVALID SUPPORT Filed March 4, 1940 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 HERMAN B. PHILIPS @LW f ATTORNEY Sept. 8, 1942. H. B. PHILIPS INVALID SUPPORT Filed March 4, 1940 4 Sheets-Sheel' 3 INVENTOR HER MAN B. PHILIPS ATTORNEY Sept. 8, 1942. H. B. PHILIPS- INVALID SUPPORT Filed March 4, 1940 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 \\Qm- Nam www INVENTOR HERMAN B. PHILIPS P -m ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 8, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE INVALID SUPPORT Herman B. Philips, New York, N. Y.

Application March 4, 1940, Serial No. 322,165

9 Claims.

This invention relates to apparatus for use by invalids, and more especially invalids unable to assume a sitting posture.

Persons suering injury of the hip or spine are often placed in a plaster cast which immobilizes the body at the hip. Such persons are unable to assume a sitting posture, and heretofore havel been left lying in bed in a horizontal position. They must remain so over along period of time, ranging from a few months to a year, and usually about a half year. It is difficult for them to eat, to read or write, or even to look around.

This problem is a fairly common one, because even in the case of a fracture or disease of the thigh, as well as the hip or spine, it is customary to immobilize the patient at the hip. In some cases, the condition is permanent, as when due to paralysis in various forms. In some cases, the patient may be immobilized by reason of traction or/and splinting apparatus.

The primary object of my invention is to provide a rigid stretcher-like support for invalids of this character, which support will be adapted to be rested on the bed to facilitate sliding transfer of the patient from the bed to the stretcher. The stretcher is provided with appropriate straps or like contrivances by which the invalid may be securely fastened to hold him in the desired position. The stretcher is adapted to be carried to any desired place as, for example, a sun room, an open garden, or the like, where it may be supported in an angular position, or even a nearly upright position. Suitable foot support plates may be provided to help support the weight of the patient. Appropriate narrow or wide arm rests are detachably mounted on the stretcher and may be adjusted to any convenient angle. The patient is then in convenient position for reading, writing, eating, conversation, observation of his surroundings, and so on, with consequent improved outlook on life, and a better disposition for a cheerful convalescence. In some cases where conditions are favorable, the invalid may even be taken for an automobile ride, the stretcher being propped up at an angle in the car,

The stretcher preferably includes stiff leg supports which are detachably mounted in position, and either of which may be replaced by an articulated leg support, so that the good leg of the patient may be bent as though seated. Either leg support may be mounted in a position angularly displaced from the center line or axis of the stretcher, this being frequently necessary with hip injuries. The stretcher is preferably provided with suitable handles to facilitate carrying the same. y

A further object of my invention is to provide a suitable frame for supporting the stretcher in any desired angular position. For this purpose, the stretcher is preferably provided with trunnions and the frame is provided with bearings adapted to readily detachably receive the trunnions of the stretcher. Adjustment means is preferably provided for changing the angle of the stretcher and for iixing the same in desired position.

In accordance with a further featureand object of the present invention, the frame is preferably provided with wheels, and then acts as a carriage to facilitate movement of the stretcher from place to place. I may include large wheels at each side of the frame, these being so dimensioned and positioned as to be operated by the invalid. The large wheels may, if desired, be provided with extra hand rings, such as are used with wheel chairs. In fact, from this viewpoint, it may be said that one object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus somewhat like a wheel chair, but adapted for use by invalids unable to assume a sitting position, and, therefore, unable to use a chair at all. The device might be termed a wheel stretcher, instead of a wheel chair.

The detachable relation between the stretcher and the support frame or carriage is important, because it makes it possible to rest the stretcher on the bed, as above described, in order to facilitate transfer of the patient to or from the stretcher. Once the patient has been securely strapped on the stretcher, he may be safely transported to the carriage. In a two-storied home, the carriage may be left downstairs and the stretcher carried with the patient from an upstairs bedroom down the stairway to the carriage, for daytime use by the patient.

l To the accomplishment of the foregoing, and other more specific objects which will hereinafter appear, my invention consists in the invalid support elements and their relation one to the other, as hereinafter are more particularly described in the specification, and sought to be defined in the claims. The specification is accompanied by drawings, in which:

Fig. l shows the manner in which an invalid may be supported on my improved apparatus;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the same with therk stretcher in horizontal position;

Fig. 3 is an end elevation of the same;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of a stretcher embodying features of my invention;

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the same;

Fig. 6 is a plan View of an articulated leg support;

Fig. 7 is a side elevation of the same;

Fig. 8 is a plan view of a wide or table-like arm support;

Fig. 9 is a side elevation of the saine;

Fig. 10 is. a plan View of a narrow arm support;

Fig. 1l is a side elevation of the same;

Fig. 12 is a plan view of a modied leg support for a child;

Fig. 13 is a side elevation drawn to enlarged scale, and explanatory of the trunnion bearing support;

Fig. 14 is an end elevation of the same;

Fig. 15 is a section taken in the plane of the line I5-I5 of Fig. 14;

Fig. 16 is a similar section, showing the relation of the parts when the stretcher is tilted to angular position;

Fig. 1'? is a section taken transversely of the stretcher trunnions and shows the method of attaching the same to the stretcher frame;

Fig. 18 is a transverse section through the stretcher frame at the trunnion';

Fig. 19 is explanatory of a modied wheel arrangement for the frame;

Fig. 20V shows a modified form of complete invalid support;

Fig. 21 is a plan view of a modified and more universally usable form of stretcher;

Fig. 22 is a side elevation; of its stii leg support arranged for extension;

Fig. 23 shows the articulated leg support in bent position;

` Fig. 24 is a side elevation of a modified bifurcated end piece for thestiff leg support;

Fig. 25 is a side elevation of a modied pipe connection forming a par-t of the stiff leg support; and- Fig. 26- is a fragmentary pla-n view similar to Fig. 21', but showing the manner in which the angle of abduction may be changed.

Referringv to the drawings, and more' particularly to Figs. 1, 2 and 3- the complete invalid support comprises a stretcher S tiltably mounted on a. suitable frame F, the latter preferably being wheeled. for increased mobility. When the stretcher is in the horizontal position, as shown in Figs.. 2 and 31,. it is. detachably related. to the frame. The angular. position may bev adjusted. by any suitable means, such as a crank or hand wheel l2, and appropriate means may be provided to lock the same in desired angular position. In the present case, the stretcher is locked by making the adjusting means a worm and gear sector which is inherently irreversible or selflocking. The frame F is preferably provided with Wheels in order to act as a carriage for the stretcher. It may be provided with small wheels for movement by a nurse or attendant, but I prefer to include a pair of' large side wheels i4 which' are of such dimension and so located that they may be reached and moved by the patient himself. This permits the patient to turn the carriage to face in one direction or another, or' to move the carriage about a room, or even from one room to another if the doorway therebetween is adequate in width- With the carriagel shown, the use of the large wheels is. optional, for the large wheels may be removed..

Considering. the apparatus in greater detail,

and referring now to Figs. 4 and 5, the stretcher S comprises a peripheral frame I6, preferably made of pipe or tubing. The frame is generally rectangular, but the sides may diverge toward one end, as is shown at I8, for a purpose later described. A back support 20 is mounted on the frame, and leg supports 22 and 24. The exposed parts of the frame, particularly the ends 26 and 28, act as convenient handles for carrying the stretcher.

The upper ends of the leg supports are pivotally mounted at 38, and the lower ends may be fixed in any of a number of positions so as to make possible abduction of the leg. Thus, in Fig. 4, the leg support 22 may be moved to the broken line position 22', or to any intermediate position, as by means of a number of holes 32. These are adapted to receive a bolt 34 (Fig. 5) formed at one end of a strap 36 secured beneath the leg support. The upper ends of the leg supports rest. on straps 38 which are preferably secured to a stout cross bar 4.0 when, as is pref.- erably the case, the stretcher is provided. With. outwardly projecting trunnions 4.2. In the. particular constructionA here shown, the straps 38 also. extend. beneath and are secured to the. back; support 2i). The mounting of the leg support on the stretcher maybe released ati Pivot 30 by' removing a nut, 4-4.

The leg supports 22 and24 are preferably provided with foot support plates 46 projecting upwardly therefrom.. These. help take the load or weight of. the patient when the stretcher is supported, in nearly upright: position, so that all. of' the weight will not be; applied to the straps.. A large number of. slotsV or other appropriate. means, such as the cleats' 4B and 50, are preferably provided on the leg supports. and on the back support to receive straps which hold the invalid rmly in position. Ordinarily, only one leg will be in a plaster cast, and it is that; leg which is strapped in position at the leg support.. The torso is strapped in position above the hip so as to prevent any stressV which might injure the plaster cast or cause movement at the im-l mobilized joint.

Either of the leg supports may befremoved and replaced lby an articulated leg support, best shown in Figs. 6 and' 7 of; the drawings. Referring; to those Figures,l the articulated leg support com-- prises a frame 52 adapted to be secured to pivot 30 at 54, and provided with-.a bolt 56 to be received. in one of the holes 32 of the stretcher frame.. The part. 58y ispivoted to frame 52' at 6,6, and is heldv in positionby a sui-.table U-shaped. support, 62,. the lower end or cross-bar ofy which maybe placed in any one ofa series of notches 64. The; part 66- is hinged' at 6 8 on the part 58.', and is adapted to be held in position. by a support T0 notched at 12 to t on; a cross-bar '1.4' of the.- support 62. Part 66 may be provided; with a foot plate 116. It will be evident that the articulated. leg support. may be adjusted in desired fashion, thus making it possible for one leg of' the patient'v to be supported in angular or sitting position, asl is shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings.

Referring now to Figs. 8' and 9, a wide or tablelike arm support: may be detachably applied to the stretcher.. The support 86 is providedT with a tting 8.2 adapted to. be received' on a suitablestud 8L4 (Fig- 4) projecting outwardly from the stretcher'frame. The frame is` also provided witha thumb screw 86 adapted to receive an adjusting arm 88 (Fig. 9) pivoted on. the arm rest 86- at' 90.. The arm. 88 may be notched, as indicated at 92, or may be slotted if an innite range of adjustment is desired. The adjusting arm '83 is shown curved, but may be made straight, particularly if it is desired that the arm rest 80 be adapted for use on either the right-hand side or the left-hand side of the stretcher.

Narrow arm rests may also be provided, one of these being shown in Figs. and 11 of the drawings. The construction is similar to that already described, the arm rest 94 being provided with a fitting 96 adapted to be received on a stud 98 (Fig. 4) projecting outwardly from the stretcher frame. A thumb screw |00 is also provided on the stretcher frame to receive adjusting arm or quadrant |02 (Fig. 11). In the present case, it is contemplated that the Wide arm support be used on the right-hand and the narrow one at the left, but additional arm supports may be provided, particularly another narrow one, the wide or table-like support being used only for eating or for games, or the like. Y The arm supports are readily attachable to or removable from the stretcher.- as by removing the thumb nuts |94 at the ends of the studs 8d and 98, and loosening the thumb screws 8E and l. The arm rests are preferably removed when the patient is being transferred from bed to the wheeled frame, or back again. If desired, the support studs 84 and 98 may be upwardly displaced or elevated somewhat, so that the arm supports may be turned to horizontal position when the stretcher is turned to the horizontal position shown in Figs. 2 and 3. This is not essential, but makes it possible for articles to be left on the arm supports within reach of the patient, even when the stretcher has been turned to horizontal position to rest the patient or to encourage a nap.

To accommodate children, the only important change needed is to shift the position of the foot support plates 4E on the leg supports in order that the child may be centrally disposed on the stretcher. Referring to Fig. 12, I show a modied leg support |86 which is like those shown in Fig. 4, but considerably shorter in respect to the distance between the pivot 30 and the foot plate 45. This difference is made up by prolonging the support strap |68, the distance between the pivot 3d and the bolt 34 being the same as that shown in Fig. 4. An articulated leg support of reduced dimension may also be provided; that is, the leg support of Figs. 6 and 7 may be provided in a childs size, as well as an adult size. Minor differences in dimension may be compensated by liberal use of gum rubber pads or folded blankets or other pads inserted at appropriate points.

It may be mentioned that -a thin layer of padding with suitable leather or other washable upholstery covering may be provided, as is indicated at Htl and H2 in Fig. 5, ybut this is not essential, and if used must be kept comparatively thin in order not to defeat the primary object of rigid and immovable support of the body.

Referring now to Figs. 13 and 14, the trunnions 42 are received in a slotted rotatable bearing H4 which is itself rotatably mounted in a slotted stationary bearing H6. The principle underlying this construction will be clear from inspection of Figs. 15 and 16. The trunnion 42 is readily dropped into or out of the rotatable bearing H which is itself rotatable in stationary bearing H6. Both the rotatable and stationary bearings are slotted or open at the top to receive the trunnion 42, this being moved vertically between the solid and broken line positions shown in Fig. 15. The slots are open at the top when the stretcher is in horizontal position. It is only in this position that it is contemplated to add the stretcher to the frame or to remove it from the frame. The stretcher may then be turned, as is indicated in Fig. 16. This is alone sufficient to anchor the stud i2 against escape from the bearing. However, if it is desired to additionally lock the trunnions in position, a further lock means may be provided such as the bolt H8, best shown in Figs. 13 and 14. This bolt is pivoted at |20 and may be swung to the open or broken line position H8', after loosening the thumb nut |22. When the bolt is swung to the solid line position, it bears against the trunnion l2 and may be locked in position by tight-A ening nut |22, the inner end of the nut being received in a mating recess.

To assemble the parts of the trunnion bearing, the rotatable bearing H4 is slid from the inside toward the outside of the stationary bearing I i6, and is provided with an enlarged inner flange |24 to limit the outward movement. The outer flange |25 is added subsequently, as by means of the screws |28. If a precautionary lock, such as the bolt H3, is employed, it is convenient to mount the same in upward projections |36 formed integrally with the outside flange |26.

The stationary bearing i It is provided with an appropriate base or flange |2 which is bolted to the upper part. i3d of the frame F. The sides of the frame are made of angle bar material which is slit or notched at E35 to permit the same to be bent in the manner shown. An upright |38 may also consist of angle bar material, and its primary purpose is to carry the axle for the large wheels.

The manner in which the trunnionbar d is secured to the pipe frame I6 is clearly showny in Figs. 17 and 18 of the drawings. It will be understood that the pipe frame may be mounted on top of the trunnion bar, thereby simplifying their connection, but there is a slight advantage in mounting the trunnion bar above the pipe frame; first, so that the latter will rest level if placed temporarily on a horizontal surface, such as the floor; second, that it will rest more nearly flush with the surface of a bed when rested on the bed Yto transfer a patient from the bed to the stretcher, or vice versa; and third, in minimizing the displacement of the center of mass of the patient when changing the stretcher from horizontal to angular position. In Fig. 5, it will be seen that the trunnion bar d does not project f above the surface of the stretcher, it being either flush or lower than the stretcher surface, because the back support 20 is itself mounted on top of the pipe frame I6.

Reverting now to Figs. 17 and 18, U-shaped clamps |118 are fitted around bar Si and their lower.` ends pass through a strap |d2 and are clamped in position by nuts ldd.

Referring now to Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawings, the side members It@ of the frame are secured at their lower ends to a rectangular bottom frame |48. The upright members |38 also extend to the bottom frame i. Crossed supports |5 (Fig. 3) may be provided between the upright members i3d in order to properly space the sides of the frame. Bearings |52 are provided on uprights |38 to receive axle |54. The main wheels I4 are preferably removably attached to axle |54, and the latter is removably slidable through the bearings |52. This is of advantagein make ing the frame considerably narrower for move#- ment through a door which is unable to receive the frame with the wheels lli.

As illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3, the frame is provided with four wheels, two large wheels I4, and two small wheels |5. These are carried on bent supports |58 rotatably mounted in appropriate vertical bearings or holes in the ends of the frame. They are removable by releasing the nuts |63. Additional bearing holes are provided near the sides of the frame at |32 (see Fig. 3), thus making it possible to use four small wheels, instead of two large wheels and twosmall wheels. This is shown in Fig. 19 which is like Fig. 3, but shows the use of two small wheels |55 at each end of the frame, the large wheels and axle being removed altogether. With this construction the patient must be moved by an attendant or nurse. The large wheels have the advantage of permitting seme movement by the patient himself. For this purpose, the large wheels may, if desired, be provided with extra hand rings |64, such as are used on ordinary wheel chairs.

The stretcher may be tilted on the frame and `loclred in position by any suitable means, such as a quadrant and lock screw, but in the present case this is accomplished by means of a gear sector and worm. Referring to Fig. 3, it will be seen that one of the two rotatable bearings |24 of the frame is fitted with a gear sector |66. In the present case, this is cast integrally with the rotatable bearing, but if it isv desired to avoid the necessity for different castings at each side of the frame, the bearings may be made alike and may be adapted to receive a separately cast gear sector. Referring now to Fig. 2, the gear sector is engaged by a worm |53 carried on a shaft Il@ passing through suitable bearing plates |12 secured to the frame. Axial movement of shaft is prevented by suitable collars or thrust bearings. The shaft |72 may be provided with a suitable crank or, if desired, with a, small hand wheel i2, rotation of which tilts the stretcher. Because of the self-locking characteristic of the worm, it is not essential to` provide additional locking means, and the gearing may itself be considered a means to lock the stretcher in desired angular position. The gear sector |56 may, if desired, be limited to a 90 arc. However, I prefer to use 130 arc, not only for symmetry and strength, but for two additional advantages. One is that in many cases the extremities may be tilted up and down for a few minutes at a time for therapeutic use, particularly in circulatory diseases. Another, 4is that the frame or carriage is made nearly symmetrical, and the stretcher may, therefore, be placed on the carriage pointing in either direction.

In the drawings, I show the large wheels i4 and the small wheels |5a` as being located on a common floor level. This has the advantage of avoiding unexpected and perhaps uncomfortable tilting of the frame, such as might result if one small wheel is raised relative to the other wheels. On the other hand, when only three wheels rest on the floor at a time, it is somewhat easier to manipulate and to turn the frame when moving it. There is some advantage and some disadvantage with either construction. from the present construction to the other type, it is merely necessary to slightly lower the bearings |52 of the axle |55, thus making the small Wheels |58 slightly higher that the large wheels.

The height of the carriage or stretcher bearing is selected to permit adequate tilting of the:

To change.

Cil

stretcher. The carriage may be high enough to permit a true vertical position, although it is enough if it permits a nearly vertical position, such as that shown in Fig. 1.

Where the matter of Width for passage through doorways is of considerable importance, the frame may be re-arranged so as to be no wider than or even of less width than the stretcher. Such an arrangement is illustrated in Fig. 20, in which it will be seen that the stretcher 20D is pivoted on top of bearings 292, instead of between the bearings. The forward sloping parts of the frame are omitted, for when they are included, as in Fig. 1, they must be spaced apart far enough for the stretcher to move therebetween. In Fig. 20, the bearings are carried on side members 204 and 266 which are spaced apart an amount which may be less than the width of the stretcher 200. The freely pivoted wheels 2t8 are mounted, as before, on the horizontal portion 2|!3 of the carriage.

Fig, 20 also shows a modified method of adjusting the angular position of the stretcher. In this case, no gearing is provided, but a sector 2|2 is slidably mounted on carriage member 284 in a guide shoe 2 I4. The forward end of sector 2|2 is pivotally and preferably detachably connected to the stretcher 29|) at the point 2 6. The sector may be locked to hold the stretcher in any desired angular position by means of a pressure screw 2|8, or other suitable lock mechanism.

As before, the stretcher is detachable from the carriage to facilitate transfer of the invalid from bed to stretcher or back again. For this purpose the frame of stretcher 25E] may be detachably received in brackets 220, which brackets remain a part of the carriage, or as an alternative, the brackets 22|) with a cross-shaft extending therebetween, may be made a part of the stretcher, in which case the bearings 252 may be left open at the topl as previously described.

As before, large wheels may be added if desired, and inasmuch as their use is optional, they areV indicated in broken lines at 222, the axle being passed through bearings 224. In this figure of the drawings the bearings have been lowered slightly so that either the front wheels and the large Wheels, or the rear wheels and the large wheels, will be resting on the fioor at any one time, instead of all the wheels.

The stretcher of Figs. 4 and 5 is satisfactory when the condition of the invalid permits the hurt leg or plaster cast to remain in the plane of the stretcher, that is, when there is no extension or exion, andr when even the abduction is comparatively' small in amount. In Figs. 21 through 26, I show a modified form of stretcher which is more universally adaptable to the various situations which arise in practice, for in very many cases the prescribed position of the immobilized leg is a combination of either extension or flexion with either abduction" or adduction Referring now to Fig. 21, the stretcher comprises a main back support 23E? having a handlel 232- and a keystone-shaped extension 234. This part of the stretcher may, if desired, be formed of a single aluminum casting, and in such case the casting is, of course, provided with appropriate webs or stiiening ribs to make the same adequate in strength yet light in. weight. A- sturdy rod or shaft 236 passes through and is preferably fixed in keystone member 234. The extreme ends of rod 235 are squared at 238 and actas trunnions which are adapted to be re- .properly assembled and adjusted for the patient, `it may be left alone until the convalescence of ,the patient 4is completed, cr until the shape of the plaster cast is changed.

For spinal and other cases, the patient, or braces on the patient, may fbe fastened to a simple form of stretcher, and extra supports perpendicular to the stretcher may be used.

It is believed that the construction, operation, and method of use of my improved invalid vsupport, as well as the many advantages thereof, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description thereof. It will also lbe apparent `that While I have shown and described my invention in several preferred forms, man-y changes and modifications may be made in the structures vdisclosed Without departing from the spirit of the invention as sought to be defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A stretcher-like support for invalids unable to assume a sitting posture, said support comprising a stiff back support having a keystoneshaped member projecting therefrom, spaced rods extending transversely through said keystone member, the projecting portions of said rods being threaded, leg supports having angularly disposed arms apertured to receive the aforesaid rods, and clamping members and nuts to lock the leg supports to the back support.

2. A stretcher-like support for invalids unable to assume a sitting posture, said support comprising a stiff back support having a keystoneshaped member projecting therefrom, spaced rods extending transversely through said keystone member, the projecting portions of said rods being threaded, the ends of one vcf said rods being arranged to act as trunnions to be received by a suitable frame or carriage, the ends of the other support being arranged to receive suitable arm rests, leg supports having angularly disposed arms apertured to receive the aforesaid rods, and clamping members and nuts to lock the leg supports to the back support.

3. A stretcher-like support for invalids unable to assume a sitting posture, said support comprising a stiff back support having a keystoneshaped member projecting therefrom, spaced rods extending transversely through said keystone member, the projecting portions cf said rods being threaded, leg supports having angularly disposed arms apertured to receive the aforesaid rods, clamping members and nuts to lock the leg supports to the back support, biasing Washers for changing the angle of the leg support relative to the axis of +he stretcher, one of said leg supports being assembled out of tubular members inserted one in the other and locked together by appropriate screws, at least some of said members being suitably dimensioned .and bent to dispose the leg support at a desired angle relative to the plane of the stretcher.

4. A stretcher-like support for invalide unable to assume a sitting posture, said support comprising a stiff back support, spaced r-ods extending transversely through said support, the projecting portions of said rods being threaded, the ends of one of said rods being arranged to act as trunnions to be received by a suitable frame or carriage, the ends of the other rod being arranged to receive suitable arm rests, leg supports apertured to receive the aforesaid rods, clamping members and nuts to lock the leg supports to the back support, one of said leg supports being assembled out of tubular members inserted one in -t-he vother and locked together `by appropriate screws, at least someofsaid ,members being suit- .abl-y dimensioned and bent to dispose the -legsupport at a desired angle relative to the pla-ne of the stretcher.

5. A stretcher for an invalid suna'ble to 'assume a sitting posture, as for example because of a spinal or hip injury, said stretcher comprising a stiff non-articulated lback support extending as a rigid member from vthe head end of the stretcher to a point below the hips of the patient, Yleg supports .at least one of which constitutes a stiff rigid non-articulated member, said member being assembled out of tWo side tubes, an end U-shaped member receiving the outer ends Aof said side tubes. and a Y-shaped member the branches of which receive `the inner ends of said'side tubes and the stem of which is secured to the back support, said side tubes being replaceable and being appropriately bent tot the needs of the particular patient, and means whereby the stem of said non-articulated leg support may be relatively permanently and immovably fixed to the -ba-ck support With the leg support at a desired .angle to .the axis of the stretcher, the back support and said non-articulated leg support being provided with means for fastening an invalid securely thereon.

6. A stretcher-like support for invalids unable to assume a sitting posture, said support comprising a stiff back .support having a keystoneshaped member projecting therefrom, spaced rods extending transversely through said keystone member, the projecting portions of said rods being threaded, and leg supports, one of said leg supports being assembled out of .two .side tubes, an end U-shaped member receiving the ou-ter ends of said .side tubes, and a Y-shaped member the branches of which receive the inner ends of said side tubes and the stem `of which is apertured to receive the aforesaid rods, and nuts to lock said leg support -to the back support, the side tubes of said leg support being replaceable and being appropriately bent to t the needs of the particular patient.

7 A support for an invalid unable to assume a sitting posture, said support comprising .a stretcher-like member, and a frame for supporting the same in any desired angular position, said stretcher-like member comprising a stiff back support having a keystone shaped member projecting therefrom, spaced threaded rods and trunnions extending transversely through said keystone member, leg supports having angularly disposed arms apertured to receive the aforesaid threaded` rods, and clamping members and nuts to lock the leg supports rigidly on the back support, said frame having bearings adapted to receive the trunnions of the stretcher member, and adjustment means for changing the angle of the stretcher member in the frame.

8. A support for an invalid unable to assume a sitting posture, said support comprising a stretcher-like member, and a Wheeled frame for supporting the same in any desired angular position, said stretcher-like member `comprising a stiff back support having a keystone shaped member projecting therefrom, spaced threaded rods and trunnions extending transversely through said keystone member, legsupports having angularly disposed arms apertured to Yreceive the aforesaid threaded rods, and clamping members and nuts to lock the leg supports rigidly on the back support, said frame having bearings adapted to detachably receive the trunnions of ceived in the bearings of a Wheeled carriage as previously described. Another rod 240 passes through and is preferably anchored in the keystone member 234. Its ends 2421 act as studs which receive arm rests as previously described, these being held on the studs by nuts screwed on threaded ends 244.

The rods 236 and 248 are used to assemble the leg supports generally designated 246 and 248 with the back support 238. Various forms of leg supports may be used, but in each case the leg support terminates in an arm, such as 258 or 252. The arms are provided with holes, so that they can be slipped over the rods 235 and 240. Clamping plates 254 and 256 are then added, followed by clamping nuts 258 and 268. The outwardly projecting ends of the rods 236 and 248 are, of course, appropriately threaded to receive the nuts 258 and 268.

Arm 252 is preferably disposed at an angle relative to the axis of the stiil` leg support 248. This angle is preferably made half of the angle of the side of keystone member 234 relative to the axis of the stretcher. Thus, the stiff leg support 248 may be inserted with either side uppermost, so that it will occupy either the solid line position 248, or the dotted line position 248', the latter position bringing the leg support parallel to the axis of the stretcher. This establishes two main positions for the stiff leg support, but various other angles are obtainable by the insertion of suitable washers or spacers on the rods 236 and 248 when clamping the leg support in position.

Referring to Fig. 26, it will be noted that in i@ this case the arm 252 of the bifurcated part 264 of the stiff leg support is disposed on the opposite side of keystone member 224. In other words, in this case it is assumed that it is the right leg of the patient that is in a plaster cast.

The angle of abduction has been increased by inserting washers inside arm 252 on rod 236, and outside of arm 252 on rod 248. The available washers preferably include angularly-shaped washers 266, as well as straight washers 268, the latter being disposed between the angular washers. The clamping member 254 is added, followed by the nuts 258 and 268, as was previously described. It will be noted that by adding or subtracting washers, any desired angle of abduction, and even adduction, may be obtained.

The stiff leg support 248 is preferably made up of a bifurcated member 264, a U-shaped tubular member 216, and two intermediate tubular or pipe members 212. at one end in member 218, and are locked in position by appropriate screws 214. These preferably pass into special iittings 215 which are threaded to act as nuts, and which are formed with loops 218 for the reception of appropriate straps for securing the cast on the support. The opposite ends of members 212 are received in appropriate tubular passages in the arms of bifurcated member 264, and are locked in position by screws and cleats, as previously described. Additional cleats may be added at the center of members 212, as shown in the drawings, so that an adequate number of straps may be used.

For extension or flexion, the intermediate members 212 are appropriately bent. In Fig. 22, it will be seen that members 212 are bent to provide a moderate amount of extension. Different members may be bent different amounts. If a change in the length of the leg support is needed, this may also be obtained by appropriate 75 Members 212 are received i change in the length of the intermediate members 212. Thus, referring to Fig. 25, I show a different intermediate member 288 in side elevation, this member being bent at a sharper angle than the member 212, and also being somewhat longer. In other cases the intermediate members may be straight, or shorter, etc.

In some cases it may be desired that the bend begin at or near the hip. In such case the bifurcated member is suitably modified, as in Fig. 24, in which I show a bifurcated member 282 in side elevation, the arm 284 of this member being disposed at an angle relative to the forked tubular arms. The intermediate members may be straight, in which case the leg support will be straight yet disposed at an angle to the plane of the stretcher. The intermediate members may also be curved, in which case the desired extension of the leg will be a more continuous curvature distributed over several points.

Referring now to Figs. 21 and 23, the articulated leg support 246 is made up of two main members 286 and 288 hinged at 298. The angle therebetween is adjustable by means of .a bent rod or yoke 292, the ends 284 of which are sprung into holes in member 288, and the cross bend of which may be received in any one of a number of notches 296 on member 286. A foot support 298 is slidable on member 285, and its position may be adjusted by means of links 386, preferably formed of a single bent rod and having ends which may be sprung apart and received in any of a number of holes 382 in the side edges of member 286. The member 288 is pivctally related to arm 258 by means of a suitable bolt 584. The angular relation may be determined by tightening the bolt 384 and, if desired, by means of a U-shaped strut 386 the cross bar of which cooperates with notches 388 on the bottom of arm 25D. When not in use this is swung downwardly and forwardly into spring clip 381. Bolt 384 may be received in any of a nirnber of holes 318 in order to properly adjust the effective length of member 288. Arm 258 is, of course, secured to the stretcher by means of the rods 236 and 248, as was previously described. The holes through arm 258 (as well as arms 252 and 284) are preferably elongated to accommodate the angularity which results, when using biasing washers as was explained in connection with Fig. 25.

The articulated leg support 246 may be readily shifted to straight position. The upward movement of member 286 is limited by the nature of the hinge construction at 288. When member 288 and arm 258 are brought into the same plane they may be locked in that position by turning anchoring lugs 'M2 from the dotted line position shown in Fig. 21 to the solid line position, so that the lugs are disposed on opposite sides of the rearwardly extending arms 314 of member 288. A suitable handle 316 is provided at the end of member 266 to facilitate carrying the stretcher. The cross bar of the U-shaped member 218 of the stii leg support acts as another carrying handle for the foot end of the stretcher.

It will be understood that two stiff leg supports may be provided, instead of one stiff support and one articulated support. It may be emphasized that inasmuch as the patient may be immobilized for a period of, say, six months. it is comparatively small trouble to order and assemble the necessary parts to make up a stiff leg support which will exactly conform to the needs of any particular patient. Once the stretcher' has been the aforesaid threaded rods, and clamping members and nuts to lock the leg supports rigidly on the back support, said frame having bearings adapted to detachably receive the trunnions of the stretcher member, adjustment means for changing the angle of the stretcher member in the frame, and wheels mounted on said frame for facilitating movement from place to place, said Wheels including one or more small freely pivoted self-steering Wheels and large Wheels at each side of the frame, said large Wheels being dimensioned 'and positioned and, if desired, provided with extra hand-rings, to be operated by the invalid.

HERMAN B. PHILIPS.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification5/610, 5/619, 5/81.10R, 5/624, 296/20, 297/DIG.400, 5/86.1, 280/242.1, 297/423.26
International ClassificationA61G5/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S297/04, A61G7/005, A61G7/0755, A61G5/006
European ClassificationA61G5/00C