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Publication numberUS2295132 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1942
Filing dateMar 22, 1940
Priority dateMar 22, 1940
Publication numberUS 2295132 A, US 2295132A, US-A-2295132, US2295132 A, US2295132A
InventorsGeorge W Flint, Thomas E Sharp
Original AssigneeStandard Oil Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Polish
US 2295132 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Sept. 1 8, 1942 POLISH Thomas E. Sharp and George W. Flint, Chicago,

Ill., assignors to Standard Oil Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Indiana No Drawing. Application March 22, 1940, Serial No. 325,471

8 Claims. (Cl. 106-8) 'The present invention relates to improvements in polishes and more particularly to improve- -ments in emulsified cleansing and polishing compositions for painted, enameled, varnished, lacquered and highly finished surfaces and the like. The composition of the present invention is particularly adapted for use in connection with the finished surfaces of automobile bodies but may be advantageously employed for cleansing andpolishing furniture and the like.

The present invention provides a wax polish composition which possesses both cleansing and polishing properties and thereby enables the accomplishment of both results in a single operation. This is highly desirable since it provides a polish which requires a minimum of time and effort to apply. The invention further provides a polish having a relatively high percentage of hard wax and a diatomaceous earth abrasive in a free flowing invert emulsion. Further, our improved polish provides a film of 'hardwax which can be rubbed to a high finish.

Our improved emulsified wax polish comprises the following constituents in approximately the specified proportions by weight:

' Per cent Organic salt 20 to 50 Hard w to Fatty acid 1.25 to 3 Alkali salt of a weak mineral acid .75 to 2 Morpholine 0 to 1 Water to 60 Abrasive 6 to 10 In the above formula the organic solvent may be a petroleum solvent, and preferably a blend of equal parts of a light petroleum distillate having an initial boiling point not less than about 360 F. and an end point not more than about 500 F. and a petroleum distillate having an initial boiling point of about 300 F. to about 312 F.

and an end point of between about 418 F. and 430 F. Inspections on two typical distillates having these requirements are given below:

Distillate A Distillate B About 46-49 A. P. I Not less than l40 F 46-49 A. P. I.

G a t i I 3 About 102 F.

F ash Distillation:

Initial 10% oil... 20% ofi. 30% ofi End point Distillate A is a petroleum distillate commonly referred to as No. 9 refined oil and distillate B is a distillate known as oleum spirits.

The hard wax in the above formulais preferably carnauba wax although it is possible to use other hard waxes, such as montan' wax, Japan wax, candelilla wax or ceresinwax. Any of these waxes can be used alone or in admixture with each other or in admixture with carnauba wax. We prefer, however, to use carnauba wax alone.

The fatty acid we prefer to employ is oleic acid although other-high molecular weight fatty acids can be used in place of it.

As the alkali salt of a weak mineral acid we prefer to use borax. However, we have obtained satisfactory results using equivalent amounts of, alkali salts of other weak mineral acids such as sodium carbonate, tri-sodium phosphate and sodium silicate. As the abrasive we have obtained'best results using a diatomite, preferably of about 200 mesh, such as Semilite. Other mild abrasives, such as other types of diatomaceous earths, colloidal clays and the likemay be used, alone or with Semilite.

vDia'tomite is preferred since it removes the sur face oxidized film without scratching or removingv excessive amounts of the basic paint, as is often the case in usual cleaning and polishing operations.

A typical preferred composition for our improved cleanser and polish is the following:

Another composition which is very effective is the following:

Per cent No. 9 refined oil 18.5 Oleum spirits 18.5 Carnauba wax 7 Oleic acid-" 1.75 Borax 1.75 Water 44. Semilite Q. 8'

The methodof preparing our improved polish consists in adding the borax or the borax and .morpholine dissolved in the water slowly to a solution of the wax and fatty acid dissolved in the petroleum solvent while the mixture is continuously agitated. The temperature of the two solutions should be above the solution tempera-. ture of the wax in the petroleum solvent. In the case of our preferred composition this temperature is approximately 150 F. After the solutions have been mixed together and emulsified the emulsion is cooled to about F. or lower nection with certain specific embodiments thereof it is to be understood that these are given by way of illustration and not by way of limitation.

We claim: 1. The method of preparing a free flowing invert emulsion cleansing and polishing composition containing the. approximate proportions of the following ingredients:

Per cent Petroleum distillate (initial B. P. of

about 300 F., end point not greater than about 500 F.) 20 to 50 Hard wax 5 to 10 High molecular weight fatty acid 1.25 to 3 Alkali salt of a weak mineral acid .75 to 2 Morpholine to 1 Water 30 to 60 Abrasive v 6to 10 comprising dissolving the hard wax in the petroleum distillate, dissolving the alkali salt of a weak mineral acid together with the morpholine in the water at a temperature above the solution temperature of the wax in the petroleum distillate mixing together with agitation the two solutions while maintaining the temperature of the mixture above the solution temperature of the wax in the petroleum distillate, cooling the mixture to about 110 Rafter the same is emulsified, adding the abrasive to the emulsified mixture and agitating the mixture until a homogeneous mass is obtained.

2. The method of preparing a free flowing invert emulsion cleansing and polishing composition as described in claim 1 in which the wax is carnauba wax, the .abrasive is Semilite, the fatty acid is oleic acid, the alkali salt is borax and the organic solvent is a petroleum naphtha.

3. An improved free flowing invert emulsion cleansing and polishing composition comprising approximately the following weight percentages of the following constituents:

Per cent Petroleum distillate (initial B. P. of a about 300 F., end point not greater than about 500 F.) 20 to 50 Hard wax 5 to High molecular weight fatty acid 1.25 to 3 Alkali salt of a weak mineral acid--- .75 to 2 Morpholine 0 to 1 Water 30 to 60 Abrasive 6 to 10 4. A free flowing invert emulsified composition of matterfor cleansing and polishing highly polished surfaces comprising the following ingredients in approximately the specified proportions by weight:

Per cent Petroleum solvent (Initial B. P. of

about 300 E, end point not greater than about 500 F.) 20 to 50 Carnauba wax 5 to 10 Oleic acid 1.25 to 3 Borax a .75 to 2 Morpholine 0 to 1 Water 30 to 60 Diatomaceous earth 6 to 10 5. An emulsified composition as described in claim 4 in which the dia'tomaceous earth is diatomite of about 200 mesh.

6. An' improved free flowing emulsified com- I position of matter for cleansing and polishing finished surfa gredients in subs tions by weight.

comprising the following inntially the following propor- 7. A free flowing emulsified composition of matter adapted for the cleasing and polishing of automobile bodies consisting of the following ingredients in substantially the following proportions by weight:'

Per cent No. 9 refined oil 18.5

Oleum spirits 18.5 Carnauba wax 7 Oleic acid 1.75

Borax 1.25

Morpholine .50

, Water 44.5 Semilite 8 8. A free flowing emulsified composition of matter adapted for the cleansing and polishing of automobile bodies consisting of the following ingredients in substantially the following proportions by weight:

. Per cent No. 9 refined oil 18.5 Oleum spirits 18.5 Carnauba wax 7 Oleic acid a 1.75 Borax 1.75 Water 44.5 Semilite 8 THOMAS E. SHARP. GEORGE W. FLINT.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.

7 September 8, 1914.2.

Patent No. 2,295,152. 4

THOMAS E. SHARP, ET AL.

' It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above nm'hbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 1, first coimn, line 27, for Organic salt" read --Organic .so1vent--; andthat the eeid Letters Patent should be read with-this correction therein that the same my ccnfem to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and ga g this 6th ds' of Octeber, A. 1 191m.

Henry Van Arsdale (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2687964 *Nov 7, 1951Aug 31, 1954Kennedy Raymond ACombined insecticide and polish
US2896242 *May 11, 1956Jul 28, 1959Personal Products CorpCleaning and scouring pads
US3222213 *Dec 28, 1962Dec 7, 1965Union Carbide CorpRinsing formulation
US3447935 *Dec 21, 1967Jun 3, 1969Lawrence L MarleyFluid polishing composition and method of making
US4035163 *Jan 13, 1975Jul 12, 1977Desoto, Inc.Conditioning cleanser for ceramic surfaces
US4064061 *Jan 4, 1977Dec 20, 1977Magi-Cloth, Inc.Cleaning cloth composition
US5641345 *Sep 26, 1995Jun 24, 1997James R. BlackComposition and method for refinishing compact disks
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/8, 51/305, 106/10
International ClassificationC11D7/60
Cooperative ClassificationC11D7/02, C11D7/10, C11D7/5027, C11D7/40, C11D7/265
European ClassificationC11D7/02, C11D7/40, C11D7/10, C11D7/26E, C11D7/50A10