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Publication numberUS2295603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1942
Filing dateSep 23, 1938
Priority dateSep 23, 1938
Publication numberUS 2295603 A, US 2295603A, US-A-2295603, US2295603 A, US2295603A
InventorsPaul Purchard
Original AssigneePaul Purchard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stapling device
US 2295603 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 15, 1942. P. PuRcHARD STAI-LING DEVICE Filed sept. 2s, 1938 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Sept. l5, 1942. P. PURCHARD STAPLING DEVICE Filed Sept. 23, 1938 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 .wNA U w,

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Patented Sept. 15, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE STAPLING DEVICE Paul Pllrclllld, Pittsburgh Pa.

Application September 23, 1938, Serial No. 231,322

A (Cl. 1-49) Claims.

This invention relates to stapling devices for clinching together papers or other sheet materials, and more in particular to small portable devices adapted to be carried in coat-pockets, either alone or when used in combination with writing implements, such as fountain pens or. preferably, mechanical pencils, now in universal use.

One of the primary objects of this invention is to provide a stapling device using staples, preferably connected together by cementing, glueing, etc., to form strips comprisingany desired number of staples.

Another object is to provide a stapling device in which staples are guided on all external sides Fig. 7 is a top plan viewv of a special pocketclip for the combination pencil and stapling device, especially intended for use when the barrel of the device is made of relatively soft material, such as hard-rubber or of synthetic resin.

tions of the so-called "pencil andthe "stapling" for longitudinal travel within a staple-channel l and automatically fed therein by a follower acting directly against the crown and both legs of the staples, thus preventing accidental toppling of the staples within the staple-channel. -as is liable to occur when said follower acts, for instance, only on one part of the staples, such as the crown.

A further object of this invention is to provide a stapling device in which the vertical travel of the staples into clinchlng position is reduced to a minimum, thus also reducing the length and travel of the staple drive-plunger.

Yet another object is to provide a stapling device which may be loaded with staples at either end of the device and in which staples which have accidentally jammed or clogged the staplechannel may be quickly and easily removed.

A still further object is to provide a stapling device in which the staple drive plunger may be positively locked into retracted, inoperative, posi tion either manually or automatically, and in which said plunger is also positively stopped in its upward travel.

Yet another object is to provide such a device having a staple clinching anvil which is flexible in the direction of the plunger travel, to thus reduce to a minimum the unguided vertical travel of the staples into clinching condition.

Additional features and advantages. of this invention will be dealt with in the following description supported by the accompawing drawings. ln which- Fig. 1 is a longitudinal section through a stapling device constructed in combination with a mechanical pencil.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross-section taken substantially on line 2-2, Fig. 1.

Figs. 3 to 6 are similar views taken respectively on lines 3-3 to 6 6 in Fig. l.

rack-gear, and

ends of the core, and

A Fig. 13 is a side elevation of the latter.

Figs. 14 and 15 are respectively front and side elevation of the plunger used in Fig. l.

.'ig. 16 is a side elevation of the plunger-spring. an

Fig. 17 is a fragmentary top-view thereof.

Figs. 18 to 20 represent respectively a sideview, an end elevation and a bottom plan view of the follower used in Fig. 1.

Fig. 21 is a top plan view of the spring and spring-rod for the follower, and

Fig.1 22 is an end view of the "penci1"end of Figs. 23 and 24 show respectively a side and an end elevation of a removable pencil separating shield which maybe used to provide a storage magazine for Pencil-leads, instead of using a separator integral with the core, as shown in Figs. 1, 2, l0. 1l and 13.

Fig. 25 is a fragmentary enlarged view. some parts being omitted, showing a modified construction of the device whereby the staple-plunger may be automatically locked into retracted position and released by direct downward pressure on the plunger.

Fig. 26 is an end elevation of the plunger used in Fig. 25.

Fig. 27 is a cross-section taken substantially on line 27-21 in Fig. 26.

Fig. 28 is a side elevation of the automatic lock-piston used in Fig. 25.

Fig. 29 is a longitudinal section showing a flexible staple-cllnching-anvil, and

Fig. 30 is a top view thereof.

Fig. 31 is a fragmentary longitudinal section showing a stapling device incorporating the au` tomaticv plunger locking mechanism and the anvil shown in Figs. -25 to 30 inclusive.

Fig. 32 is another fragmentary longitudinal section showing another method of operating the plunger by means of a rack and spring actuated Fig. 81is a top plan view of the rigid anvil used Fig. 33 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line 33-33 in Fig. 32.

Fig. 34 is a cross-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on line 3I3I in Fig. 1

to accommodate the lock-plug which is preferably shaped to form a socket 6 for the eraser E and the eraser-cap C, if the last two elements be desired. On top of the barrel is the pocketclip 1 and the staple-driving-plunger (hereafter called the plunger) 8. Opposite the latter there is on the underside of the barrel the stapleclinching-anvil 3 (hereafter called the anvil), which in the present embodiment is assumed to be of the rigid type.

These and the other parts of the device will be more fully described hereinbelow.

The staples S, preferably grouped in the form of strips, are loaded and guided for longitudinal travel within the core-member I0, preferably made of die-cast light metal, such as aluminum, or of suitably machined extruded metal. As more fully detailed in Figs. to 13, this coremember is of basically cylindrical form and ts snugly within the barrel I of the device. As close as practical near the bottom of the core there is provided throughout the core a rectangular staple-channel Il in which the substantially U-shaped staples may slide, however with the least possible loose play.

This core extends closely to the inner end of the bushing 2 and is provided at the bottom with a slot I2 starting a short distance from the end and closed thereat by a transverse-stop I3, for purposes to be explained hereinafter.

At the top of the pencil-end of the core there is formed a thin, arcuate, separator I4 which accommodates the shank P of the pencil-unit and forms a magazine M between the core and inner wall of the barrel, wherein pencil-leads L may be stored.

At the-rear of the magazine. the core is made cylindrical to form a partition I5 which also serves as a guide for the core within the barrel I. On the other side of this partition the core is partly slotted longitudinally and axially, as at I6, to produce the flat boss I'I on which the inner end of the plunger leaf spring I8 may be secured in any desiredmanner, such as by screws or, preferably by dowel-pins I9 formed integrally with the core and engaging suitable holes provided therefor in said spring.- Beyond the slot I6 the core is fiat at the top, as at 2li, and assumes to within a short distance of its stapling-end" a substantially semi-cylindrical shape (Fig. 3) for the purpose of reducing the weight of the device and facilitate the insertion of the core in the barrel.

The stapling-end of the core-member again assumes a cylindrical shape and is provided with a longitudinal slot 2|, reaching into the staple channel and forming the continuation of the slot I6. In the former slot the free portion of the plunger-spring is guided for free vertical exing.

The face 22 of this end of the core is vertically slotted, as at 23, Figs. 10, 12 and 13, to act as a guide for the transversely reciprocable plunger, and the depth of this slot is equal, or slightly greater, than the width of a staple-unit or the blade of the plunger. The latter is guided at the rear by the fiat face of the end-plug 4 which abuts directly against the erd 22 of the core andi-v ably made of non-circular cross-section in order to prevent the follower from turning about the spring-rod.

As shown in Figs. l, 31 and 32, the end of the spring-rod 28 extends a relatively considerable distance within the follower (when the latter is in its most outward position, veryjclose tothe blade of the plunger 8) and it is provided with lateral stop-lugs 23 for a purpose to be described hereinbelow.

The pencil-end of the flat spring-rod 26, shown especially in Figs. 1, 21 and 22, is twisted at right angles to its main portion; it is provided with a V-shaped notch 30 and is preferably bent slightly downward to clear the shank P and so that the lower prong 3I of the notch may engage the transverse stop I3. As shown in particular in Fig. 10, the outer end of the slot I2 is preferably recessed into a substantially V-shape, as at 32, to properly center the spring-rod at that end. Upon the spring-rod there is suitably located a washer 33, backed by a pin 34; between said washer and the end wall of the follower the spring 25 is inserted, under a suitable initial compression.

The just described construction of the staple feed mechanism oiers the following advantages:

First, pencil-leads may be taken out of the magazine M without the whole staple feed mechanism being forced out of the barrel due to the compression in the feed-spring, the force of which being greatest when a full strip of staples is present in the staple-channel.

Second, when the last staple has been used and it becomes necessary to reload. the device, the notched end of the spring-rod may be easily disengaged from the transverse-stop I3, thereby allowing the spring -25 to force out the springrod an amount equal to the distance between the stop-lugs 29 on the rod and the end-wall 28 of the follower. This brings the notched end of the rod out of the barrel where it may be readily grasped to extract the complete feed mechanism for inserting a new strip of staples into the channel II.

The upper prong 3l at the notched end of the spring-rod is preferably so proportioned that it may be inserted in the bore for the pencil-lead at the small end of the tip of the pencil-unit P, and

verse-stop I 3 for the spring-rod were not used and the latter were allowed to press directly. against the removable bushing 2, every time the same were removed to extract a pencil-lead, said rod would, as already stated, spring out of the barrel; moreover the screwing-in of said bushing would be more difllcult because of the resistance of the spring 25, and the friction created by the latter against the bushing would eventually cause a deformation of the spring-rod which would be detrimental to the free sliding movements of the follower thereon. v

It will also be noted that the staple-strip may be quite easily inserted when the open end of the barrel is held topmost, thus preventing the spilling of the pencil-leads which may be stored in the magazine M.

The plunger 8 used in Fig. 1 is more fully detailed in Figs. 14 and 15. It comprises a plungerhead 3S upon which the user of the device presses with his thumb; to said head is secured, either by riveting or by integral formation, the plungerblade $8 of a thickness substantially equal to the longitudinal width of a staple unit. The lower, active, end of said blade performs the severing and clinching of the staples and may be made either straight or suitably curved inwardly, as at 31, to concentrate the pressure on the staple-legs and also favor the inward folding thereof, as will be understood by persons versed in this art.

'I'he plunger is preferably slightly bevelled on the side 4facing the staples, as at' 38, in order to prevent more than one staple being severed at one time from the staple-strip. The plungerblade is preferably reinforced by a central rib 39 extending from the head downwardly to a point slightly above the top of the staple channel. This rib forms also an abutment for the free end of the plunger-spring I8 which normally tends to raise the plunger. The upper portion of the plunger-blade is somewhat reduced to produce the shoulders 4B which limit the upward travel of the plunger, and, at a point corresponding with the axis of the barrel, there is provided a round hole 4I to lock the plunger into retracted, inoperative position, as will be described herebelow. The plunger-spring Il, as shown in Figs. 16 and 17 in particular, comprises a base 42 fitting snugly in the slot I6 of the core-and having suitably spaced holes 43 for the dowel-plns I9. The end of this base is preferably folded upwardly and reduced in parts to produce a secondary spring 44 adapted to yieldingly bear against the inner periphery 'of the barrel, thus holding the plunger-spring on the boss i1 and resisting the reaction due to the downward flexing of the freeend 45 of said plunger-spring. Preferably. this end is made narrower than the base of the spring and closely, engages a recess 39s provided in the reinforcing-rib 39, to obviate transverse wobbling of the plunger.

The anvil 9, shown in Figs. l, 8 and 9 in particular, is of the rigid type; it comprises the main body 46 inwardly shaped to conform with the contour of the barrel, and the tongue 41, the end of which has a suitably shaped compound curve 48 to promote the folding of the staplelegs, when pressure is exerted on the plunger. This curve may be so shaped as to cause the outward folding of the staple-legs or else, as assumed in this embodiment, the inward folding thereof.

and 50. The latter has an extension 5| (Fig. 1) protruding into the channel Il and acting as a stop for the follower 24, to prevent same from getting in the path of the plunger-blade and thus insure unobstructed operation thereof.

To accommodate this extension, a groove 24'* closed at one end is provided in the lower side of the follower.

'I'he flexible anvil i2 (Figs. 29 and 30) differs from the rigid one only in that the tongue portion 53 is made longer and exible in the direction of travel of the plunger, so that when pressure is exerted on the anvil by the fore-finger (while the plunger is being depressed by the thumb) it will flex upwardly and practically close-up the paper-feed-slot, or gap G into which sheets to be stapled together are inserted, and thus eliminate any unguided travel of the staples.

'I'he holes 54 provided on top of the fiat portion of the core permit the insertion of the rivets 49 and 50 into the suitably drilled and countersunk bottom of the staple-channel.

As shown in the drawing, the barrel is preferably partly ground olf, as shown by dot and vdash lines at E5, directly above the anvil-tongue to reduce the travel of the plunger and staples. The

extreme end of the barrel is left intact, as at 56,

' the protruding end 51*i of the rivet. Moreover,

The anvil is fastened to the barrel'and the I the shoulder produced on the rivet, at the base of said end, serves as a stop to limit the exure of the anvil in the direction of the plunger, as shown in-broken lines in Fig. 31.

Because of the support given by the forefinger to the anvil, the latter is not heavily stressed during the act of stapling and may therefore be stamped and pressed out of relatively thin and exible metal, preferably hard brass or stainless steel.

When not in use, the plunger 8 is locked in its depressed position by means of a lock-pin 58, engaging the hole 4i in the plunger and driven centrally in the lock-plug 5 and passing also through a central guide-hole provided in the end-plug 4.

The threaded connection between the endplug and the lock-plug shown in Figs. l and 6 is of the well known and quick acting breechlock type which requires only a fractional turn of the lock-plug to either quickly engage the lock-pin with the plunger or release same. A spring 59 within the lock-plug is used to force the lock-pin out of engagement with the plunger. If desired, other equivalent quick acting means, such as a pin and slot connection of the bayonet type (not shown) could be used to eiect a quick operation of the lock-pin.

In the construction used in Fig. 32, the endplug and the lock-plug are provided with continuous internal threads of relatively great pitch, to reduce the rotation of the lock-plug to one turn or less.

In order to prevent the loss of the coarsely threaded lock-plug, stop means such as the tangential pin 60 may be used, said pin permitting only the axial movement of the lock-plug actually required thereby for proper functioning. Y

The pocket-clip 1 shown in the drawings is preferably made of thin but hard metal, such as bronze or stainless steel and is especially designed for use with barrels made of relatively soft material, such as hard rubber or some synthetic resin, unable to resist the abrasive action of the hardened steel plunger.

As shown in Fig. 7, the pocket-clip comprises l the clip-finger 6I and the saddle-base 62 shaped to iit the barrel and in which a substantially cruciform slot 63 is provided, said slot comprise, ing the narrow and deep part 64 which slidably guides the rib 39 of the plunger, the wid part l5 85 provided to allow the insertion'of the wide' and lower part of the plunger-blade"36, and the outer part 66 which guides the narrow upper part of the plunger-blade.

After the plunger has been introduced in the' 20 barrel and core, the clip is moved over so that the narrow part of the plunger-blade will nest into the slot 66 for proper guidance. The upward travel of the plunger is then limited by the shoulders 40 thereon striking against tneflat- '25 eral sides of said slot. Holes 61 are provided in the saddle base for rivets or screws 68whereby the clip may be fastened to the barrel and core.

It will be noted that this clip practically hides `from sight the protruding free end of the raised 30 plunger-spring and the oblong slot 69 cut in the barrel therefor. Of course, apertures are provided in the barrel to register with the slot 53 in the saddle-base and for the lower end of the plunger-blade which, necessarily must protrude below the underside of the barrel.

As plainly shown in Fig. 1, for instance, the plunger-head ts closely to the pocket-clip and is preferably made somewhat higher than the latter in order to improve the appearance of the device and concentrate the pressure exerted by the user on the plunger when clinching papers together.

When the barrel is made of abrasion resisting material, such as metal, the above mentioned 4,-,

slot 63 and the saddle-base 62 of the clip may be omitted, and a' clip of anyv suitable conventional design may be used. i

In order to simplify the 'die-casting ofthe core-member, it may be found advisable-to eliminate the integral separator I4, to slot' the corresponding end of the core in order to accommodate the shank P' and to introducethe arcuate pencilshield 10, shown in -Figsl 23, 24,

made of sheet material thinner than could be die-cast economically. This thinner shield, will of course increase the storage capacity of the magazine M; A

'I'he plunger locking mechanism, shown in Figs. 25 to 28 and 31, maybe called automatic, in so far as it does not require special mampulation' of the above described lock-plug 8, which plug is in fact eliminated, but whereby the locking of the plunger is controlled exclusively by lthe latter. 'I'he operation of this mechanism is A suitably bent latch-spring 18 is riveted at 18 75 the plunger .is released, will force the latterv up to the plunger and fits within the large groove 18. This latch has a`,longitudina1 slot 11, open Aand rounded oi! at its lower end, and provided with two connecting holes 18 and 18; the lower hole 18 being co-axially disposed with the barrel, when the plunger is depressed into locking position.

'I'he lock-piston 88 used in this embodiment is placed co-axially in the end-plug 8l and comprises a rear-shank 82, the large collar 88, an intermediate stem 84 thin enough to freely engage the open slot 11, a stop-head 85 larger than the hole 18 but smaller than the hole 19 and a lock-pin 88 Awider than the latch-slot 11 but smaller than the hole 18 and the plunger-groove 14. A spring 81 is used to force the piston into locking position, and a disc 88, centrally apertured at 89 to guide the stop-head is inserted in the face of 'the end-plug, the latter being suitably threaded for the barrel I and provided with a socket 6 for the eraser E and its cap C.

The operation of this locking mechanism is as follows: StartingV from the position shown in Fig. 25, it will' be seen that the lock-pin 86 is just outside of the latch 15 and'that, when papers are inserted in the gap G for stapling, the plunger 1I will not go deep enough for the stop-head 85 to engage the larger hole 1S. Hence, this plunger may be operated freely and without locking.

When it is desired to lock the plunger into inoperative position (there being, of course. neither papers nor staple in the gap G), it may be depressed further so that the lock-pin 86 may `engage the lower ,hole 18 and thus lock the staple-plunger, the lower end of which will reach only partly into said gap. j

To release the plunger, further pressure is exerted thereon to fully depress it way-down to the anvil, thereby causing the stop-head 85 to freely enter the larger hole 19, and said head. due to the force of the coil-spring 81, will come behind the latch 15 and rest on the edge of the plunger-@groove 14, thus bringing the thin stem 8l in line with the, slot 11 in the latch. 'I'humbpressure on the plunger is now eliminated and the powerful plunger-spring I8, overcoming the slight resistance offered by the spring-latch 15, will force the plunger up into raised position and bring the lock-pim again in the position shown in Fig. 25.

It will be noted that in this construction the lock-plug 5 used in the rst embodiment has been'eliminated. It will also be observed that the rib-extension 12 (which is made narrower than the length of,the staple-crown) will force the staple-strip back into its channel, an amount equal to the height of said extension over the plunger-blade, each time a staple is severed by the latter; for this reason the lower end of the extension facing the strip of staples is gradually A I8 for the plunger is replaced by a gear and rack mechanism comprising the gear 8l, freely 'mounted on the arbor 82 and actuated in a counterclockwise sense by the double torsion- 'spring 88. This gear meshes with a rack 84 ountersunk longitudinally in the stiiIening-rlb of the plunger 88 so as not to come directly in contact with the staples. Downward pressure on the plunger will tighten said spring which, when into staple-feeding position, as will be readily understood.

If desired, the rack-gear may be provided with an untoothed portion 98 which will limit the counterclockwlse rotation of the gear, and hence, the upward travel of the plunger.

In this construction, the stiffening-rib of the plunger will also push the staple-strip back into its channel every time the plunger is depressed, and to facilitate the proper operation of the latter, its lower end opposite the staple-strip is also gradually beveled olf, as plainly seen in Fig. 32, at 98.

If desired and as shown in Fig. 34. the diameter of the core member, and hence the inside diameter of the barrel, may be slightly reduced by making the staple-channel 91 inthe core Ills open at the bottom and using the inside of the barrel as the lower guide for the legs of the staples S. The pencil-end of this core (when a pencil-shield is used) will then consist of only two spaced vertical sides which are preferably joined together, for greater strength and to facilitate the insertion of the core into the barrel, by means of an integral transverse-stop I3, against which the spring-rod 28 abuts.

The end-plugs 4 and 8| are removably screwed in the barrel so that staples which may accidentally clog the staple-channel may easily be shaken out, or forced out by the feed-spring when the plunger is in its raised position.

If desired, the staple-strip may be inserted into the device from the stapling-end, by forcing said strip against the pressure exerted by the feed-spring 25. However, the method of loading from the "pencil-end of the device will generally be found more convenient and will not subject the staple-strip to undue stresses liable to fracture it.

In the various embodiments shown the longitudinal axis of the staple-channel is set as far as possible below the axis of the barrel and coremember, in order to reduce the travel of the plunger and staples, and also to provide better guidance for the plunger when in raised position and ample space above the staple-channel for the spring mechanism of the plunger, thus reducing the length of the slot 69 (Fig. 1) in the barrel which accommodates the protruding end of the plunger-spring I8.

From the foregoing description, it is thought that persons versed in the art will understand the operation of the various embodimentsef'this invention disclosed very easily and that, therefore, an explanation thereof may be dispensed with.

It is evident that various novel features described hereinabove may be applied to stapling devices other than such used in combination with writing implements, by simply changing the size or proportions of the structural elements.

Many changes in the preciseconstruction, arrangement and combination of the various parts may be made without departing from the field and scope of the claims of this invention, and it is intended to include all such changes in this application.

I claim:

l. In a stapling device having the shape of a mechanical pencil or the like and including a casing, a. plunger, a follower to feed staples thereto, a resilient anvil having one end rigidly secured -to said casing and the other end being free and flexible toward said plunger, and means positioned on said anvil to limit the movement of the follower toward said plunger.

2. In a stapling device having the shape of a mechanical pencil or the like and including a casing, a plunger, a follower to feed staples thereto. a resilient anvil having one end rigidly secured to said casing and the other end being free and flexible toward the plunger, and unitary means to limit the movement of the follower toward said plunger and also limit the insertion within the device of the material to be stapled.

3. In a stapling device having the shape of a mechanical pencil or the like and including a casing, a plunger, a follower to feed staples thereto, a resilient anvil having one end rigidly secured to said casing and the other end being free and flexible toward said plunger, and unitary means positioned on said anvil to limit the movement of the follower toward said plunger and also limit the insertion within the device of the material to be stapled.

4. In a stapling device having the shape of a mechanical pencil and the like, a core-member having a rectangular longitudinal channel to receive staples and guide same exteriorly, a casing for said core-member; a plunger reciprocable normally to said core-member; an anvil cooperating with the plunger to clinch the staples; a follower slidable within said channel; a guiderod of substantially rectangular cross-section freely engaging the follower; a stationary abutment positioned on the core-member for said guide-rod; a washer ilxedly mounted on the guide-rod; a spring positioned around the guiderod intermediate said washer and follower to force same toward the plunger; stop-means formed integrally with the guide-rod and at one end thereof to prevent disengagement of the follower therefrom, and means at the other end of the guide-rod adapted to releasably engage said stationary abutment.

5. In a stapling device having the shape of a mechanical pencil or the like and including a casing, a plunger, a follower to feed staples thereto, a resilient anvil having one end rigidly secured to said casing and the other end being free and flexible toward said plunger, and unitary means positioned on said anvil to limit the flexure thereof toward said plunger and also linut the insertion .within the device of the material to be stapled.

6. In a stapling device having the shape of a mechanical pencil or the like and including a casing, a plunger, a follower to feed staples thereto, a resilient anvil having one end rigidly secured to said casing and the other end being free and flexible toward said plunger, and unitary means positioned on said anvil to limit the movement of said follower and the flexure of the anvil toward said plunger and also limit the insertion within the device of the material to be stapled.

"l. In a stapling device, a core-member having a substantially rectangular longitudinal channel to receive staples and normally guide same for sliding movement of the legs thereof along the bottom of said channel; a casing for said coremember; a plunger reciprocable normally to the core-member; an anvil cooperating with the plunger to clinch staples; a follower slidable within said channel; a non-cylindrical guide-rodpositioned within said channel and freely engaging the follower; a stationary abutment for the guide-rod; a spring-abutment on the guide-rod, and a spring positioned thereon intermediate the spring-abutment and 'the follower to force same toward the plunger.

8. In a stapling device. a core-member having a substantially rectangular longitudinal channel to receive staples and normally milde same for sliding movement of the legs thereof along the. bottom of the channel; a casing for said coremember; a plunger reciprocable normally to the core-member; an anvil cooperating with the plunger to clinch the staples; a follower wholly slidable within said channel; a guide-rod of substantially nat rectangular cross-section positioned within said channel and freely engaging the follower; a stationary abutment positioned on the core-member for the guide-rod; a springabutment on the guide-rod; a spring positioned thereon intermediate said spring-abutment and the follower to force same toward the plunger; stop-means at one end of the guide-rod to prevent disengagement of the follower therefrom, and means integral with said rod adapted to l releasably engage said stationary abutment.

9. In a stapling device, a core-member having a substantially rectangular longitudinal channel to receive staples and normally guide same for sliding movement of the legs thereof along the bottom of the channel; a casing for said coremember; a plunger reciprocable normally to the core-member; an anvil cooperating with the plunger to clinch the staples; a follower wholly slidable within said channel; a guide-rod of substantially flat rectangular cross-section positioned within the channel and freely engaging the follower; a stationary abutment positioned on the core-member for the guide-rod; a springabutment on said rod; a spring positioned on the guide-rod intermediate the spring-abutment and the follower to force same toward the plunger; stop-means formed' integrally with the guide-rod at one end thereof to prevent disengagement of the follower therefrom, the other end of the guide-rod being twisted substantially at right angles to the main bodythereof and adapted to releasably engage said stationary abutment.

10. In a stapling device, a core-member having a substantially rectangular longitudinal channel to receive staples and normally guide same for sliding movement of the legs thereof along the bottom of the channel; a casing for said coremember; a plunger reciprocable normally to the core-member; an anvil cooperating with the plunger to clinch the-staples; a follower wholly slidable within said channel; a guide-rod of substantially flat rectangular cross-section positioned within said channel and freely engaging the follower; a stationary abutment positioned on the core-member for the guide-rod; a springabutment on said rod: a spring positioned on the guide-rod intermediate the spring-abutment and the follower to force same toward the plunger; stop-means formed integrally with the guide-rod at one end thereof to prevent disengagement of the follower therefrom; the other end of the guide-rod being twisted substantially at right angles to the main portion thereof and adapted to releasably engage said stationary abutment, and a projection positioned on said twisted end providing a hold for releasing the guide-rod from said stationary abutment.

PAUL PURCHARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2486500 *Jun 21, 1946Nov 1, 1949Shocket William AStapling device
US5114257 *Mar 15, 1991May 19, 1992Nick HsuWriting apparatus with stapler incorporated therein
US7189021 *Sep 28, 2005Mar 13, 2007Q Marketing, Ltd.Writing or marking instrument with attached stapler
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/126, D19/44, 401/52, D19/51
International ClassificationB25F1/00, B25C5/00, B43K29/00, B25C5/02, B43K29/18
Cooperative ClassificationB25C5/0292, B25F1/006, B43K29/18
European ClassificationB25C5/02G2, B25F1/00C, B43K29/18