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Publication numberUS2295886 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1942
Filing dateSep 30, 1941
Priority dateSep 30, 1941
Publication numberUS 2295886 A, US 2295886A, US-A-2295886, US2295886 A, US2295886A
InventorsNelson Beck
Original AssigneePeter Louis Montemurro, Raymond Emory Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe rack
US 2295886 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N. BECK 2,295,886

SHOE RACK Filed. Sept. 50, 1941 Sept. 15, 1942.

.lmmaz/vaz Mam Ibex Patented Sept. 15, 1942 UNHTED STATES PATENT OFFICE SHOE RACK Application September 30, 1941, Serial No. 412,981

2 Claims.

This invention relates to a shoe rack.

An object of the invention is to provide a shoe rack that can be mounted upon the interior of a closet door or any other suitable support which will serve to support or rack shoes adequately. In the conventional shoe rack there are spaced horizontal bars on which shoes are deposited. The upper of these bars is designed to engage the forward edge of the heel in such a manner that the sole of the shoe rests against the lower bar of the rack. These racks frequently are located in a dark portion of a clothes closet so that difficulty is experienced in selecting from the rack the desired pair of shoes. Such racks are also disadvantageous in that theyare incapable of supporting wedge type shoes or those shoes wherein the bottom surface of the heel is flush with the sole with no recess or shoulder at the forward part of the heel. By means of the present invention shoes of all types whether equipped with the conventional heel or with Wedges may be satisfactorily mounted on the rack and if the rack is mounted on a closet door, the shoes on the rack will be swung into an open position that is usually well lighted to facilitate selection of the desired pair of shoes from the rack.

Another object of the invention is to provide a shoe rack that is of simple, sturdy, and inexpensive construction.

With the foregoing and other objects in View, which will be made manifest in the following detailed description and specifically pointed out in the appended claims, reference is had to the accompanying drawing for an illustrative embodiment of the invention, wherein:

Figure 1 is a partial view in front elevation of the shoe rack embodying the present invention; and

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken approximately upon the line 2-2 upon Fig. 1.

Referring to the accompanying drawing wherein similar reference characters designate similar parts throughout, the improved rack comprises a horizontal supporting bar l which may be formed of wood or any other suitable material. This supporting bar preferably has apertures ll therein designed to receive screws or equivalent fastening devices l2 for mounting the supporting bar on a suitable support such as a closet door D.

The bar Ii! has a flat upper surface I 3 and a flat forward surface It and may be ornamentally molded as at l5 adjacent its bottom. On the rack there are a plurality of individual shoe supports. Each support comprises a length of relatively heavy Wire bent centrally to provide a toe-engaging portion 15 which is disposed upwardly and forwardly of the bar I0 so that when a shoe S is mounted thereon the top of the shoe above the heel will naturally swing or rest against the forward surface it of the bar. From the toe-engaging portion IS the sides of the wire spread downwardly and rearwardly slightly and then slightly contract as indicated at ll. The sides are preferably bent slightly downwardly and rearwardly as indicated at l8 in Fig. 2. Adjacent their lower ends the sides of the wire are bent horizontally rearwardly as at I9 over the top surface I3. The downwardly extending portions 20 may be equipped with sharpened points and are driven into the bar It].

In applying shoes S to the rack, each shoe is slipped over its support and is lowered until the toe-engaging portion l6 engages the toe of the shoe. If the toe of the shoe is open, as has been the case with some forms of womens shoes, the toe-engaging portion l6 engages the sides of the shoe adjacent the open toe. The upper portion of the shoe normally swings and rests against the forward surface I 4 although this is not essential to the construction.

If the rack is mounted on a closet door, all of the shoes mounted thereon are swung by the door when opened into a readily accessible position. All of the shoes on the rack are readily available for inspection purposes in making a selection.

From the above-described construction it will be appreciated that the improved shoe rack is relatively simple in construction, durable in design, and relatively inexpensive, and that it will support shoes in the desired position regardless of whether the shoes have shoulder forming heels or wedges.

Various changes may be made in the details of construction without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A shoe rack comprising a supporting bar, and a plurality of shoe supports thereon, each support being in the form of a wire bent centrally to form a toe-engaging portion, and sides which spread slightly and then contract in extending downwardly and rearwardly from the toe-engaging portion, the lower ends of the sides being bent horizontally rearwardly over the top of the bar and then extending downwardly into the bar.

2. A shoe rack comprising a supporting bar, and a plurality of shoe supports thereon, each support being in the form of a wire bent centrally to form a toe-engaging portion, and sides which spread slightly and then contract in extending downwardly and rearwardly from the toe-engaging portion, the lower ends of the sides being bent horizontally rearwardly over the top of the bar and then extending downwardly into the bar and being pointed.

NELSON BECK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2509336 *Jul 18, 1946May 30, 1950Darby Albert SShoe rack
US4460094 *Mar 24, 1983Jul 17, 1984Schoen Edmund RArticle holding device
US5097966 *Sep 12, 1990Mar 24, 1992Wood Logic, Inc.Storage rack
US5199581 *Apr 2, 1992Apr 6, 1993Lee Rowan CompanyGolf equipment support rack
US6533127 *Aug 18, 2000Mar 18, 2003Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6637603 *Jul 3, 2002Oct 28, 2003Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6793080 *Jul 3, 2002Sep 21, 2004Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6926157Sep 8, 2003Aug 9, 2005Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6992118Sep 8, 2003Jan 31, 2006Cooper Vision Inc.Ophthalmic lenses and compositions and methods for producing same
US7021475Sep 8, 2003Apr 4, 2006Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US7025214Sep 8, 2003Apr 11, 2006Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/35, 12/53.7
International ClassificationA47L23/20, A47F7/08, A47L23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47F7/08, A47L23/20
European ClassificationA47L23/20, A47F7/08