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Publication numberUS2296543 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 22, 1942
Filing dateAug 3, 1940
Priority dateAug 3, 1940
Publication numberUS 2296543 A, US 2296543A, US-A-2296543, US2296543 A, US2296543A
InventorsHarry G Smith, William E Steen
Original AssigneeSmith Meter Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Deaerator
US 2296543 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 22, 1942. w. E. STEEN ETAL DEAERATOR Filed Aug. 3, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet l [I2 venia las. William 25729612. Kaffy 6. 'mil'iz.

Sept. 22, 1942. w. E. STEEN ET AL DEAERATOR Filed Aug. 3, 194C 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Sept. 22, 1942. w. E. STEEN ET AL DEAERATOR Filed Aug. 3, 194C 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 i4. 5 6 2 u 4 re? 5 4 4 4 fO @g4 y .L y a M 4 (W f F ,www W .ha .MH

Patented Sept. n, 1942 #amsn OFFICE nEAEnAron William E. Steen and Harry G. Smith. Pasadena, Calif., assignors to Smith Meter Company, Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of California Application August 3, 1940, Serial No. 350,910 8 Claims. (Cl. 18S-2.5)

This invention relates to de-aerators, and is more particularly concerned with means for eliminating air and vapor entrained in iiuids such as petroleum derivatives.

There are many occasions calling for such elimination and these are too well known to warrant discussion here. However, it may be said that the device here shown is useful to particular advantage in connection with the elimination of air or vapor from gasoline or fuel oil just ahead of a meter, for it is well undertsood that in the absence of such elimination, the metering cannot be accurate. It is distinctly to be understood, however, that the invention is not limited to this particularuse.

The device is of such a nature that it takes into account the peculiarities of bubble-behavior, it having been found that much of the entrained air is in the form of bubbles which are too small to rise any appreciable extent while the uid is iiowing with any appreciable speed. On the other hand it is not feasible to provide an eliminator of such size that the fluid will be suiliciently quiescent to permit the smaller bubbles to rise to a point from winch they may be exhausted.

Our device takes these considerations into account, being so fashioned that the small bubbles have to rise only a short distance individually, then intermingling in a manner to form larger bubbles which are capable of following the relatively long path through which certain of them must travel to reach the top of the fluid body.

How this is done, may be discussed to better advantage in the following detailed description, wherein there will also be described a novel valve and actuating means therefor, by which the air gathering at the top of the tank is smoothly and evenly discharged lwhen it has gathered in any predetermined` amount. It involves a plurality of orifices of varying size which are sequentially opened as the uid level is depressed by the gathering air.

Generally, it is the object of the invention to provide a simple, sturdy and extremely eiilcient type of de-aerator.

Reference will be had to the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a longitudinal medial section 'through a device embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a section on line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a section on line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary section of the air-exhaust valve shown in the saine aspect as F1a 13 Fig. 5 is a plan view of Fig. 4, with the valve cap removed and i Fig. 61s a fragmentary plan of the orifice plate of the valve.

Though this is not limitative, the de-aerator is here shown as made up of a horizontally arranged cylindrical tank or housing I0, the cylindrical body portion II being closed at its ends by caps I2 and I3. Inlet I3 and outlet i4 are coaxial with barrel or body member II, though it will be noted that outlet I4 is in communication with the lower part of the housing and at a point below the lowermost separator member (to be described) through an angle pipe I5.

Spaced axially from News? and end wall I2, is a circular, verticitllyriX y ged header or distributor plate I8 which is peripherally welded or otherwise suitably secured to barrel II. Welded or otherwise suitably secured to the inner face of header I6 are the ends of separator plates I'I, which, at their other ends IB stop short of end wall I3. The uppermost plate I'Ia is shorter than the other separator plates, its free end Ilia being supported by posts I9 extending upwardly from the separator plate next below. In fact, the upper separating plate is preferably made in two sections II (Fig. 2) which are spaced apart at their inner edges at opposite sides of the vertical axial plane of the housing, the space between sections being indicated at 20.

'I'he free ends of the other separator plates I1 are supported in vertically spaced relation by securement to band 2 I as by welding, the band also being welded or otherwise suitably secured to the inner face of barrel Il.

Preferably, the separator plates incline oppositely and upwardly from the points at which they intersect the vertical axial plane of barrel il, thus being given shallow, trough-like characteristics as viewed in cross section (Fig. 2). The side edges 22 of separator plates I1 throughout their longitudinal extent are spaced from barrel II, the spaces as so defined being indicated at 23.

'Header I6 is provided with distributor apertures 24, these apertures being arrangedin rows immediately below each separator plate, itfollowing that liquid within space S (defined between end I2 and header I6) will beadmitted to the interior of barrel II at points immediately beneath theindividual separator plates and air bubbles contained therein will, in large part, be delivered immediately beneath those separator plates. The apertures may either 'be in single rows. as shown in connection with the two lower and the top separator plates (Fig. 2) or they may be in double rows, with the individual apertures staggered, as shown in connection with the other separator plates, but in any event it is highly desirable that they be quite closely adjacent the under sides of the separator plates. The aggregate cross-sectional area of apertures 24 is preferably slightly larger than the crosssectional area of inlet I3.

A drainage opening 25 through header I6 puts space S in communication with the lower part of the m-ain chamber or compartment C, as defined by barrel II which, in turn, may be drained by removing plug 26; while an aperture 21 through header I6 puts the upper end of space or chamber S into communication with the interior of the barrel at a point above separator plate I1a, so air gathering at the top of space S may be discharged `to the top of the chamber C and be exhausted therefrom in the manner to be described.

The free ends of separator plates I1 are slotted as at 28 to accommodate the well 29, which is in the form of a vertically arranged cylinder peripherally secured at its upper end to the outer face of barrel II. The interior of Well 29 is put into communication with chamber C through side wall openings 38 and openings 3l in bottom wall 32. Welded to the under side of the separator plates are downwardly extending baiiies 33, these baiiles being arranged in wedge-shaped form as viewed in plan, with the point 34 of the wedge pointing towards header I6. They are located so the ends of their legs are near the free ends of the separator plates while points 34 are approximately mid-way of the length of barrel II, though as shown in Fig. 1 the bales may vary in longitudinal extent. On the other hand, the baiiles 33', applied to the under side of separator plate sections I1', are preferably t much closer to header I6, but auxiliary baies 35 at the free ends of sections I1' are more nearly in line with baies 33.- Bafiles 33 and 33' may conveniently be in the form of angle irons welded to the under side of the separator plates.

As liquid enters chamber S, it is distributed through apertures 24 to chamber C along the under sides of separator plates I1. The bubbles in the spaces between separator plates will be delivered mostly -directly to the under 'side of f those separator plates,.but in any event, they have but a very short distance to rise before striking. the separator plate next above. The smaller bubbles tendv to gather on the under side of the separator plates and form, together, larger bubbles. In their continued tendency to rise, the bubbles roll upwardly and radially outward along the under, inclined surfaces of the separator plates toward spaces 23, They pass upwardly through these spaces to the top of chamber C where they break-surface, thus forming lan air or gas body on top the liquid body. The baiiles 33 tend to prevent the bubbles along the under face of the separator plates from reaching a point in line with the orifice I of outlet pipe I5, but rather guide those bubbles radially outward toward spaces 23. Orifice I5 is thus disposed at a level anda longitudinal location where the liquid will have been fully deaerated, the outlet flow thus being in a condition to be accurately metered, if that be the next step in the handling of the liquid.

It will be seen that as the formerly entrained air or vapor is released to.' form an air or vapor body on top the liquid body, the liquid level will be slowly depressed, and it therefore becomes necessary that the air or vapor body be exhausted when it reaches predetermined proportions. We have devised a particularly efficient valve for this purpose.

Attached to ange 49 which surrounds and is applied to the upper end of well 29 where it extends outside barrel II, is a. valve housingl chamber C, the iiuid being admitted to the well through openings 3I. Air within the top of chamber C is free to enter the top of the wel] and hence the dome through openings 36.

Base portion 42 has an internal boss 48 through which extends the exhaust or relief outlet passage 49, this passage opening to a horizontally disposed orifice 50, which orifice is also horizontally elongated as shown in Fig. 6. The orifice opens to the upper boss-face 5I, an orifice plate 52 being bolted thereto at 53, there preferably, however, being interposed an extension of gasket 46.

Plate 52 has three orifices 54, 55 and 56, of progressively increased diameter, raised seats 51, 58 and 59 being provided about the` respective orifices.

Upstanding yfrom plate 52 are apertured bosses 66 which support shaft 6I, the latter extending in parallel relation to orifice 50, as viewed in plan (Fig. 6). 'I'he shaft is pinned against rotation at 62, while mounted for individual rotation thereon are valve members 63, 64 and 6-5, adapted to coact, respectively, with seats 51, I56 and 59. These valve members are of identical construction so but one need be described in detail. Referring to Fig. 4 it will be seen that valve member 65 is of angular form, one arm being represented by cup 66 supporting disk stopper 61 in overlying relation with seat 59, a follower .button 68 and pin 69 serving to 'hold the stopper disk 61 against dislodgment from cup 66 but allowing it suicient freedom of movement to be self-adjusting to the seat.

Arm 10 of `member 6-5 extends upwardly from shaft 6I and has a horizontal extension 1I to take the upper end of spring 12, the lower end of that spring lbeing' bottomed in recess 13. It will ibe seen that push-spring 12 tends always to rotate member 65 in a clockwise direction, as iviewed in Fig. 4, and thus to hold the valve Iclosed. 'I'he other valves are mounted in the same manner and have similar springs for urging them constantly toward closed position.

Mounted for oscillation on shaft 14 is a bellcrank 15, it being noted that shaft 14 is supported .by the upright brackets 16 on the internal flange 11 of base 42. The long arm 18 of crank 15 is pivotally connected at 19 to rod 80, the latter carrying at its lower end the cylindric float F (preferably a hollow metal cylinder). The float may be guided in its vertical movement by a depending, coaxial pin 8| which extends through guide-bore 82 in well-bottom 32.

The two relatively short, integral arms 83 of bell-crank 15 are pivotally connected by shaft 84 with the two arms 65 of valve-pusher 86, this pusher having a cross-head 81 which lies parallel to shaft 8|. and shaft 89, the latter being cnixialdwithV and carried by cross-head 81. The linksguidev the -Iorward end o1' member 88 in its movement vas set up by oscillation of bell-crank 15.

'Ilfiecross-head carries actuating lugs' 90, 9| and 82 which are of progressively increased length and are vopposed to the'arms 10 of members 65, Gland 63, respectively.

In Figs. 7l and 4, the valve and float are shown in the positions they occupy when there is no need for exhausting air from chamber C, the fluid level lbeing sufficiently high to carry float F at an elevation where, through bell-crank 15, the cross head-81 is clear of valve-arms 10, and therefore the valve springs hold the valves closed. However, when the fluid level in chamber C is depressed by an accumulation of air at the top of that chamber, the float descends, rotating bell-crank in a counter-clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 4, and thrusting pusher 86 to the left, -as viewed in lthat figure. Due to the clearance between the distal `end of the pusher and the valve members, there is a range of floatrise and fall where there will be no valve actuation. However, as soon as the float drops sufciently to thrust pusher 86 to the left an.extent which engages the long arm 92 .with the arm 10 of valve 63, any further descension of the float acts through the pusher and arm 92 to rotate valve 6,3 against its spring and to open position, thus allowing the air within dome 41 to exhaust through outlet 49. Further descension of the float will successively bring arms 9| and 90, on pusher 86, into contact -with their respective valves 64 and 85 and thus successively open those valves. l

It will -be noted that the valve and pusher arrangement is such that the smallest orice will be first opened, then the next larger orifice, and finally the largest orice, this giving a smooth even opening instead of a sudden popofl. And also, in spite of the fact that the ultimate, aggregate exhaustv opening is relatively large and the total, aggregate valve-stopper area is likewise large, this arrangement permits the valve, taken as a whole, to b opened very easily and with the application of relatively little force (represented by the weight of the float) in spite of the fact that the valves may be opening against relatively large pressure.

As the air is exhausted from the dome 41 and the top of chamber C, the fluid level in that chamber rises, causing a coincident rising of the float and the swinging of bell-crank 15 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 4, -withdrawing pusher 86 to the right, and thus allowing valves 65, 64 and B3 to close in sequence under the action of their springs.

Various changes in design, structure `and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a de-aerator for liquid flow lines, a housing, a header plate extending across the housing and spaced from one end wall thereof, there being a fluid inlet opening to the'space between end wall and header, a plurality of vertically spaced separator plates extending Isubstantially horizontally from said header toward the other end of the housing, there being apertures through the header immediately below each separator plate, the side edges of the separator plates being spaced from th'e side wall of the housing whereby air or vapor bubbles may pass between Links 88 pivotally connect shaft' 8|- the side wall and edges to the top of the houslng, mean-s for exhaustingthe lair `.o1-,vapor from the top Ijof Vrthe jhousin'g.' :and there being" a, fluid outlet near the other end of thec housing. f

2.' In a deaerator for liquid flow linesfa housing, a header plate'extending across ythe'hous- .ing and spaced from one end wall thereof, there being a fluid inlet opening tothe space'between endwall and header,` a plurality of vertically spaced v,separator plates extendingsubstantially horizontally fromfsaid header toward the other endl of the housing, there beings, row of n apertures through the header immediatelybelow each separator plate and extending from side to side thereof, the side edges of the separator plates being spaced from the side wall of the housing whereby air or vaporbubbles may pass between the side wall and edges to the top of the housing, means for exhausting the air or vapor from the top of the housing, and there beingv a uid outlet near the other end of the housing.

3. In a de-aerator for liquid flow lines, a housing, a header plate extending across the housing and spaced from one end wall thereof, there being a fluid inlet opening to the space between end wall and header, a plurality of vertically spaced separator plates extending substantially horizontally from said header' toward the other end of the housing, there being apertures through the header immediately below each separator plate, the side edges of the separator plate being spaced from the side wall of the housing whereby air or vapor bubbles may pass between the side wall and edges to the top of the housing, means for exhausting the air or vapor from the top of the housing, and there being a fluid outlet duct near the other end of the housing, the inner end of the duct being located near the bottom of the housing and the outer end of the duct opening to the outside of th'e housing of a higher level.

4. In a, de-aerator for liquid flow lines, a housing, a header plate extending across the housing and spaced from one end wall thereof, there being a iiuid inlet opening to the space between end wall and header, a plurality of vertically spaced separator plates extending substantially horizontally from said header toward the other end of the housing, there being apertures through the header immediately below each separator plate, the side edges of the separator plates being spaced from the side wall of thel housing whereby air or vapor bubbles may pass between the side wall and edges to the top of the housing, downwardly extending bailles on said separator plates and spaced longitudinally thereof from the header, means for exhausting the air or vapor from the top of the housing, and there being a fluid outlet near the other end of the housing.

5. In a de-aerator for liquid flow lines, a housing, a header plate extending across the housing and spaced from one end wall thereof, there being a fluid inlet opening to the space between end wall and header, a plurality of vertically spaced separator plates extending substantially horizontally from said header toward the other end of the housing, there being apertures through the header immediately below each' separator plate, the side edges of the separator plates being spaced from the side wall of the housing whereby air or vapor bubbles may pass between the side Wall and edges to the-top of the housing, downwardly extending bailies on said separator plates and spaced longitudinally thereof from the header, said bames extending from side to side of their respective separator plates, means for exhausting the air or vapor from the top of the housing, and there being a iluid outlet near the other end of the housing.

6. In a de-aerator for liquid ilow lines, a housing, a header plate extending across the housing and spaced from one end wall thereof, there being a iluid inlet opening to the space between end wall and header, a plurality of vertically spaced separator plates extending substantially horizontally from said header toward the other end of the housing, said separator plates having portions, at least, inclining upwardly toward the side wall of the housing, there being apertures through the header immediately below each separator plate, the side edges of the separator plates being spaced from the side wall of the h'ousing whereby air or vapor bubbles may pass between the side wall and edges to the top of the housing, means for exhausting the air or vapor from the top of the housing, and there being a uid outlet near the other end of the housing.

7. In a de-aerator for liquid flow lines, a housing, a header plate extending across the housing and spaced from one end wall thereof, there beiing a fluid inlet opening to the space between end wall and header, a plurality of vertically spaced separator plates extending substantially horizontally from said header toward the other end of the housing, there being apertures through the header immediately below each separator plate, the side edges of the separator plates being spaced `from the side wall of the housing whereby air or vapor bubbles may pass between the side wall and edges to the top of the housing. downwardly extending baihes on said separator plates and spaced longitudinally thereof from the header. saidbailles extending from 4side to side of their respective separator plates,

and angling outwardly with respect to the separator plates and rearwardly with respect to the header, means for exhausting the air or vapor from the top'of the housing, and there being a fluid outlet near the other end of th'e housing.

8. In a de-aerator for liquid ow lines. a housing, a header plate extending across the housing and spaced from one end wall thereof, there being a fluid inlet opening to the space between end wall and header. a plurality of vertically ,spaced separator plates extending substantially horizontally from said header toward the other end oi the housing, said separator plates inclining upwardly and outwardly from each' side of their longitudinal center lines, there being apertures through the header immediately below each separator plate, the side edges of the separator plates being spaced from the side walLof the housing whereby air or vapor bubbles may pass between the side wallfand edges to the top of the housing, means for exhausting the air or vapor from the top of the housing, and there being a fluid outlet near the other end of the housing.

WILLIAM E. STEEN HARRY SMITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2592685 *May 4, 1950Apr 15, 1952Gilbert & Barker Mfg CoAir separator for liquids
US2613498 *Oct 25, 1949Oct 14, 1952Gen ElectricOil separation and reclaiming means for gas turbine power plants
US4276059 *Aug 9, 1979Jun 30, 1981Elast-O-Cor Products & Engineering LimitedDeaerator for pulp stock
US4388944 *Aug 25, 1980Jun 21, 1983Keizo HonmaDevice for capturing air bubbles from fluids in piping
US4997464 *Mar 23, 1990Mar 5, 1991Kopf Henry BDeaeration apparatus
WO2010066436A1 *Dec 10, 2009Jun 17, 2010Krones AgAlcohol receiving station
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/204, 96/165, 137/224, 137/202
International ClassificationB01D19/00, B67D7/76
Cooperative ClassificationB01D19/0042, B01D19/0063, B67D7/763
European ClassificationB01D19/00P, B01D19/00R, B67D7/76B