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Publication numberUS2297118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 29, 1942
Filing dateAug 6, 1940
Priority dateAug 6, 1940
Publication numberUS 2297118 A, US 2297118A, US-A-2297118, US2297118 A, US2297118A
InventorsWildegans Erich K
Original AssigneePaul Rohland Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf practicing device
US 2297118 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept 29, 1942- E. K. wlLDEGANs GOLF PRATICING DEVICE Filed Aug. 6, 1940 INVENToR. M fafeyaf// A TTORNEYS.

Patented Sept. 29, 1942 GOLF PRACTICING DEVICE Erich K. Wildegans, Providence, R. I., assigner to Paul-Ruhland, Inc., a corporation of Rhode Island Application August' 6, 1940, Serial No. 351,612

a claims.

This invention relates to a golf-practicing device of the general character described in the application of Curt J. Rohland, Patent No. 2,213,570, entitled Golf apparatus; and this invention has for one of its objects to provide a construction which may be more easily and accurately inserted into the ground to attain a vertical position with reference to the surface of the ground in which it is inserted.

Another object of the invention is to provide a construction which, although hammered into the ground, will not change the pitch of the helical guide about which the tethered element to be driven is guided, and thus a more uniform golfpracticing device may be manufactured.

Another object of the invention is to provide an arrangement by which the driven element is always maintained captive and cannot escape from the post about which it spins.

Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus which may be so disassembled that it may be compactvly arranged in a carton for shipment.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction as will be more fully described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawing:

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of the golf apparatus in position for use, illustrating in dotted lines the position of the driven element as remaining captive on the post;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation with the base in section as shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the base element detached from the pin of the device;

Fig. 4 is an elevation, partly in section, of the pin with the guide and head member assembled thereon;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view on line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is an elevation of the helical guide alone;

Fig. 'I is a sectional view showing the manner of guiding the link or tether of the driven element about the pin.

Fig. 8 is a View similar to Fig. 4 of a modiiied construction.

In the use of golf-practicing devices as illustrated in the Curt J. Rohland patent above mentioned, it has been found that people attempt to drive the device into the ground with a hammer or some other implement with such force that the center post becomes bent and the pitch of the helix changes so that the accuracy of the measurement of a golf stroke is thrown off. Also, it is found that where two spurs are to be inserted into the ground the short one may cause the upright guide to be inclined somewhat to the horizontal. Further, by the utilizing of one piece of material for providing both the inserts into n the ground and the xing of this wire in the base,

as illustrated in said patent, a rather large box is necessary for the packaging of a device of this character.

In order to improve upon these features, I have arranged a center pin which will directly take any thrusts of the hammer blow for driving it into the ground, and none of this force, due to resistance of the ground, will be transmitted to the helical member. In this manner a stronger pin may be provided and a very accurate helical guide may be also provided. Further, I have arranged that the driven element may be maintained captive, and I have provided a separate base so that the base may come apart from the pin for more compact packing. I have also eliminated the separate spur which may cause the tilting of the guide pin from the vertical; and the lfollowing is a more detailed description of the present embodiment of this invention, illustrating the preferred means by which these advantageous results may be accomplished:

With reference to the drawing, IIJ designates a base plate originally of generally rectangular construction and which has its corners II bent downwardly to provide spurs for insertion into the ground, forming the same octagonal in shape. An opening I2 is formed in the center of this plate through which a guide pin I3 may be inserted.

This guide pin, as illustrated more fully in Fig. 4, is pointed at its end I4 and has assembled upOn it a helical guide I5, shown alone in Fig. 6. This guide consists of a coil of Wire ci a desired number of convolutions and of a certain predetermined pitch. At the ends of this coil, the Wire is rolled into a small loop, designated I6 at one end, and I'I at the other end,

which will tightly encircle and frictionally grip the pin I3 to hold the coil rmly in place upon the pin. A stop, as shown at 3E! in Fig. 8, may be located below the coil I'I. Suitable jigs and necessary pressure may be provided for positioning this coil upon the pin at a location such as shown in Fig. 4 so that the portion I8 of the pin extends above the irictional encircling and gripping coil I6. Upon this portion I8 a head member I9 is provided which has a neck 20 and a flange 2| and may be welded or otherwise secured in position.

When this pin is thus equipped with this helispaced slightly from the head end. during initialinsertion of the pin. The stop 30 which engages the base I will prevent pressure beingrexertedl on the helical guide, evenrif` thefpin isl driven A,

beyond its intended limitrofinsertionf there is no distortion of the pitch of the'hehx. The driven element, designated 25, conslsts of an imitation golf ball, usually ofl softV spongeI rubber. Y element 25; and at the other end of this link there is a loop 21, suitably secured, which en'- circles thepinor'post |3 and which isgguided in its pathbetween thelconvolutions of the helix l Thus, as the driven elementl 25 is struck by the: golf club; itsrtethe'rA 26 will. allow It to. swing aboutv the post ISST until. it passes. outi of` theheli'calf guide, and it will' then swing about. the neck portion 2) of the head until the energy. imparted; to this-driven'v element is xpended.

The foregoing description' is directed. solely towardsthe'` construction. illustrated; buti I desire it' to" be understood that` I reserve the privilege of resorting, to all the. mechanical changes, toi

whiclfrthe'device'isisusoeptible;

Il claim:

1. In; a. device for-practicing thev swing of.' a golf club,` aA pin; to.` be inserted into the. ground;l ahead on saidY pin .comprising a collar embracing. said; pin with a angey extending: out'- wardly'at it's upper' end; a' separate helical wire guide abouti said pinv and. spacedV therefrom, a ball having` a tether, provided' withY a, loop at its end` embracing'` the pin, said: guide provided withatightfcoiled portion frictionally: andv firmly A link, 26, is secured to this-drivenl embracing said pin beneath said collar and arranged to deliver the looped end of the tether onto said collar for unrestricted rotation of said ball about the collar beneath said flange.

2. In a device for practicing the swing of a golf club, a pin to be inserted into the ground, a head on said pin comprising a collar embracing said pin` with a flange extending outwardly at its upper end, a separate helical wire guide about said pin and spaced therefrom, a ball having a tether provided with a loop at its end embracing the pin, said guide provided with a tight coiled portion frictionally and iirmly embracingsaidv pin-beneath said collar and arranged to, deliver. thev looped end of the tether onto said collar for unrestricted rotation of said ball about the collar beneath said flange, the lower end of said helical wire being tightly coiled to frictionally and rmly embrace said pin and anchor said guide in position, and a plate through which saldi pin extends, said plate abutting the lower coil embracing said pin;

3'. In. a. device for practicing the swing of a golf club, a pin to be inserted into the ground, a head on said pin comprising a collar embracing said? pin with a ange extending outwardly at itsupperfend, a separate helical wire guide about said pin and spaced therefrom, a ball having a tether provided withl a loop at its end embracing the pin, said guide provided with a tightcoiled portion frictionallyl and firmly embracing said pin beneath said co-llar and arranged to deliver the looped end of the tether onto. said collar for unrestricted rotation ofthe ball about the collar beneath said flange, the lower end-ofvsaidV helical wire being tightly coiled to frictionallyand firmly embrace said pin and anchor said guide in position, and a plate through which said pin extends, and provided with downwardly bentspurs, said plate abutting the lower coll embracing said pin and acting as a stop to` assist in driving the plate spurs into the ground by striking said head.

ERICH K. WILDEGANS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5024446 *Jul 3, 1990Jun 18, 1991Norman Neville MIndicating means for tetherball game
US5083796 *Jul 3, 1990Jan 28, 1992Norman Neville MBi-modal line attachment for tetherball game
US6135895 *Aug 23, 1999Oct 24, 2000Estivo; RobertGolf training system
US6554716 *Aug 9, 2000Apr 29, 2003James Cheng Wah LohGolf “swing for accuracy” mat
US7285054Apr 20, 2007Oct 23, 2007Morrison WilliamGolf skill development and practice device
US8182371 *Jul 8, 2008May 22, 2012Swingball LimitedTether tennis game apparatus
EP0247982A1 *Apr 2, 1987Dec 2, 1987Kurt LarssonA means for training golf swings
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/147, 473/149
International ClassificationA63B69/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/0091
European ClassificationA63B69/00T3