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Publication numberUS2297555 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 29, 1942
Filing dateAug 5, 1940
Priority dateAug 5, 1940
Publication numberUS 2297555 A, US 2297555A, US-A-2297555, US2297555 A, US2297555A
InventorsHedberg Carl W J
Original AssigneeResearch Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical precipitator
US 2297555 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sex 29, i942.' c. w. J. HEDBERG ELECTRIC PRECIPITATOR Filed Aug. 5, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 @www v @3M '/Mf Sept 29, 1942- c. w. J. HEDBERG 2,297,555

ELECTRIC PRECIPITATOR Filed Au g. 5, 1940v 2 sheets-sheet 2 z 4f. l 0': /4 4f Patented Sept. 29, 1942 2,291,555 announcer. rnsclrmi'ron can w. J. Hedberg, Bound Brook, N. J.,

vto Research Corporation, corporation of New York Application August 5,

3 Claims.

This invention relates to an electrical precipitator for the removal of suspended particles from gases. It is especially adapted to meet conditions which make it necessary or desirable to enter or leave the precipitator'in a vertical direction and is particularly suitable for the treatment of gases carrying suspended particles of such characteristics that it is advantageous to subject the gases to electrical treatment during vertical, and especially upward, iow.

A principal purpose of the invention is the provision of a vertical now electrical precipitator wherein the gases are brought into and out of the precipitator at the top thereof.

A further purpose of the invention is to provide an electrical precipitator in which gas inlet and outlet means are provided which do not require any additional floor space over that required by the precipitator itself whereby substantial savings in space requirements are ob tained. A further object of the invention is the provision, in simple and economical manner, of an electrical precipitator in which the conditions, particularly the temperature of the gas during treatment may be maintained substantially uniform and in which the heatcontent of the gases may be conserved during treatment. Other purposes and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description of the invention which4 comprises a casing, one or more substantially vertical partition members within the casing extending from the top of the casing t a point adjacent to and spaced from the bottom of the casing to provide at least one duct extending from the top of the casing to the bottom portion thereof, and at least one treating chamber open to the bottom portion of the casing, spaced discharge electrode and collecting electrode assemblies within the casing, a conduit for supplying gases to be treated to the upper end.

of said duct from directly above the casing, and a conduit for withdrawing treated gases from-the upper end of said chamber. Advantageously supporting and electric power supply means for the discharge electrode assembly are positioned in a box extending across the upper portion oi' the treating chamber or across the conduit leading therefrom and provided at the'bottom with openings into the treating chamber.. The bottom portion of the precipitator casing is preferably of conical or pyramidal shape to provide a receptacle for the collection of lprecipitated material.

.advantageously a plurality of partition members are provided within the precipitator casing assilnor New York, N. Y., a

1940, Serial N0. 3515465 to divide it into a plurality of treating chambers separated lbv downtake ducts or with downtake ducts on two` opposite sides oi' each treating chamber, whereby greater uniformity of gas distribution and greater uniformity 'of temperature within the chambers may be attained. Uniformity of gas distribution may also be advanced by providing suitably shaped perforated plates or guide members in the downtake ducts or at the bottom end thereof.

The invention will be more particularly described ior the purpose of illustrating the principles of the invention with reference to the ac companying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is an end elevation in partial section;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation in partial section; and

Fig. 3 is a plan View, of an electrical precipitator embodying the principles of the invention;

' and i3. Extending upward from the precipitator casing are outlet conduits i6 communicating with the upper end of the chambers l@ and inlet conduit SE- communicating with the upper end of downtake duct i2.

Extending through each of outlet conduits it are insulator boxes it, containing discharge electrode `supporting members il, it carried on insulators i9 and supplied with high potential electric power from a source, not shown, by conductor 20. Support members i8 extend through openings 2i in the insulator boxes i8 into chambers I3 and are there attached to frame members 22 of the discharge electrode assembly including discharge elements 23.

Collecting electrode assemblies 24 including rod members 25 are positioned in the precipitator chambers spaced from the discharge electrode assemblies and connected tothe grounded shell i0.

Rapping mechanism 26 for rapping the discharge electrode assemblies is mounted in insulator boxes I6 and actuated by motor 21. The

`collecting electrode assemblies are rapped by mechanism 28 actuated by motor 29.

Perforated plate 30 is mounted in duct I2 to increase the uniformity of distribution of the gas. The lower portion of the casing is formed by cone-shaped bins Il.

larger and heavier particles carried by the gas are deposited in bins 3| because of the centrifugal effect of the change in direction of ow and because of the decreased velocity of flow on passing into the precipitator chambers. On passing upwards through chambers I3 between the collecting electrodes the remaining particles are precipitated on the collecting electrodes by the action of the electric field maintained between the electrode assemblies and the precipitated material falls, especially on rapping the electrodes into bins 3|. The cleaned gases pass around insulator boxes I6 through outlet conduits I4.

It will be seen that the introduction and removal of the gas is effected entirely from above the precipitator casing, that due to the extensive heat transfer contact between the downtake duct and the precipitator chambers a high uniformity of temperature of the gases during the treating operation is provided, which preventsk channeling and uneven precipitation, and that the highly effective upward vertical flow oi.' gases through the electric precipitating `iield is provided in combination with high heat conservation and with a maximum economy of space utilization.

In the precipitator shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6, casing ID is divided by partition members Ii, I i' into central downtake duct I2, lateral downtake ducts I2 .and precipitator chambers I3. Gases to be treated are supplied directly to the downtake ducts i2, I2' through inlet openings I5' in supply conduit 40, and treated gases are led from the top of the precipitator chambers I3 to take-off conduit 6I through outlet conduits Il.

The remaining elements of theprecipitator are similar to the elements bearing like numerals in Figs. 1, 2 and 3.

In this form of the invention, the precipitator chambers are in heat exchange contact on oppocasing to a point adjacent to and spaced from,Y

the bottom of said casing to provide at least one duct extending from the top of said casing to the bottom portion thereof and at least one treating chamber open to the bottom portion of said casing, spaced discharge electrode and collecting electrode assemblies within said chamber, conduit means for supplying gases to be treated to the upper portion of said duct from directly above said casing, conduit means for withdrawing treated gases from the upper end of said chamber, means providing a box extending across the upper portion of said treating chamber and communicating with said chamber solely through openings in the bottom of said box, and discharge electrode supporting and power supplying means in said box and extending through said openings to support and energize the discharge electrode assembly in said treating chamber.

2. An electrical precipitator comprising a casing, substantially vertical partition members within said casing extending from the top of said casing to a point adjacent to and spaced from the bottom of said casing to provide at least one duct extending from the top of said casing to the bottom portion thereof and at least one treating chamber open to the bottom portion of said casing, spaced discharge electrode and collecting electrode assemblies within said chamber, conduit means for supplying gases to be treated to the upper portion of said duct from directly above said casing, conduit means' for withdrawing treated gases from th upper end of said chamber, means providing a box extending across said withdrawing conduit means above said treating chamber and communicating with said chamber solely through openings in the bottom of said box, and discharge electrode supporting and power supplying means in said box and extending through said openings to support and energize the discharge electrode assembly in said treating chamber.

3. An electrical precipitator comprising a casing, substantially vertical partition members within said casing extending from the top of said casing to a point adjacent to and spaced from the bottom of said casing to provide at least two vertical ducts and a vertical treating chamber therebetween within said casing and with the bottom ends of said ducts in communication with the lower portion of said treating chamber,

spaced discharge electrode and collecting electrode assemblies within said chamber, conduit means for supplying gases to be treated to the upper endspf said ducts from directly above said casing, conduit means for withdrawing gases from the upper end of said chamber, means providing a box extendingI across the upper portion of said treating chamber and communicating with said chamber solely through openings in the bottom of said box, and discharge electrode supporting and power supplying means in said box and extending through said openings to support and energize the discharge electrode assembly in said treating chamber.

CARL W. J. HEDBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4263023 *Jan 17, 1980Apr 21, 1981Metallgesellschaft AktiengesellschaftMultizone electrostatic precipitator
US4283205 *Apr 6, 1979Aug 11, 1981Schumann John LInlet flue system for banks of electrostatic precipitator chambers
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/73, 96/35
International ClassificationB03C3/34, B03C3/82, B03C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB03C3/00, B03C3/82
European ClassificationB03C3/82, B03C3/00