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Publication numberUS2297791 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1942
Filing dateMay 25, 1938
Priority dateMay 25, 1938
Publication numberUS 2297791 A, US 2297791A, US-A-2297791, US2297791 A, US2297791A
InventorsNess Harold J
Original AssigneeNess Harold J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Atomizing device for pulverulent material
US 2297791 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oci. 6, 1942. 1-1.4. NES${ 2,297,791

ATOMIZING DEVICE FOR PULVERULENT MATERIAL Filed May 25, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 \NVENTOR Ha, raid JAG-5s avg-n Mb ATT RNEY llil Oct. 6, 1942. H. J. NESS ATOMIZING DEVICE FOR PULVERULENT MATERIAL Filed May 25, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATT: FCNEY R o T N E v m Patented Oct. 6, 1942 ATOMIZING DEVICE FOR- PULVERULENT MATERIAL Harold J. Nels, Bloomfield, N. J.

Application May 25, 1938, Serial No. 209,885 14 CLIIIIIS-v (Cl. 302-46) This invention relates to injecting apparatus and more particularly to apparatus for mixing powdered material with air and/or other gas and introducing the same into a furnace or the like.

It is desirable in many instances to introduce various chemical treating agents into furnaces and similar treating chambers and as an example of 1 such practice there is shown in my copending application Ser. No. 79,968, filed May 15, 1936, a process of producing a lithium atmosphere in a metallurgical furnace by the introduction of powdered lithium compounds, such as the carbonate, chloride or fluoride of lithium, into the furnace mixed with the air or fuel. The apparatus of the present invention is particularly suitable for the introduction of lithium compounds into a furnace for carrying out the in: vention of the aforesaid application, but it is equally useful for mixing powdered material with the gas for any purpose whatsoever;

In a copending application Ser. No. 143,410, filed May 19, 1937, I have shown one form of apparatus for the above purpose. Briefly such apparatus comprises a suitable container for the powdered material provided with means for agitating the powder therein and for permitting the passage of gas through the chamber during such agitation so that it will become laden with the powder and thereby convey the powder in suspension therein tothe furnace or other treating chamber. The present invention is a continuation in part of my aforesaid copending application Ser. No. 143,410, one of the objects being to increase the efliciency of operation of the injecting mechanism.

Another object is to simplify the construction of the machine and to decrease and facilitate the maintenance thereof.

A further object is to permit better regulation of the quantity of powder obtainable from the inspirator whereby a more uniform minimum flow and a greater maximum'flow of the powder is obtained.

Another object is to prevent access of the pulverulent material to the glands and bearings of the movable parts of such apparatus.

Another object is to prevent clogging or ob structing of the outlet conduit of the atomizer.

Other objects and advantages will hereinafter appear;

The invention will be better understood by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

injecting apparatus embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a front view, as

Fig. 1, of the apparatus;

Fig. 3 shows diagrammatically the pitchrelation of the blades used in the apparatus foragitatingthe powder;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1; m

Fig. 5 is a sectional view on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 6 is a sectional view on the line 6'-6 of Fig. 1.

The apparatus comprises a base plate in upon which is mounted an upright standard H by means of bolts 12. A container IQ for the powder to be inspirated is secured to the right side of the standard H, as seen in Fig. 1. The powder container consists of a cylindrical tube 14, preferably compo of transparent material, such as glass having a low coefllcient of expansion, as

a bore-silicate glass, or it may be of a plastic composition such as a phenol resin. The tube ll rests in a recess in the annular flange 15 of a base casting it. which is secured to the upright standard H by bolts 11. An upper closure member 18, also secured to the vertical support H, by bolts I3, is provided for the tubular member ll. Suitable gaskets 2| are clamped between the cylinder II and the upper and lower closure members by tie rods 22. Extending into the container i3 through a stufllng gland 23 in the lower casting i8 .is a shaft 2!, journaled in ball bearings 25 and 26 mounted in the yoke portions of the casting i8 and retained in place by suitable bearing caps, as shown in Fig. 1. The shaft 24 is revolved by a belt 21 driven from a motor 28 suitably mounted on the opposite side of the vertical upright II. Secured to the shaft 24 are several sets of powder lifting and agitating blades designated as 29, 30, 3|, 32, 33 and 34. The blades 23 to 3| decrease in length, as shown in Fig. 4, and increase in pitch progressively from the lowermost to the uppermost thereof. The pitch of the individual sets'ofblades is shown diagrammatically in Fig. 3 and varies from 15 at the lower and 30 at the upper, although it is obvious that the increase may be in different ratios from that specified. It is also to be understood that the blades are not all disposed in the same vertical plane, this arrangement being shown in Fig. 3 only for simplicity in illustrating the pitch of the blades' The lower blades 29 are integral witha collar 29' securedto the shaft Fig. 11s a side view, partly in section,'of an 24 by a set screw. The lower face of the collar seen from the right of" gland closure plate 39 is held in place by screws 40. Grease is supplied to the gland 23 by a cup 42 communicating with a lantern ring 43. The purpose of the gland is to make a 'gastight seal for the shaft 24 and the function of thelabyrinth seal is to maintain the gland free from the powder in the container |3.

A cylinder or stack 4| is supported below the top closure member II! by means of rods 44 welded thereto and passing through the cover plate l8.

Suitable nuts (not shown) are provided on the upper threaded ends of. the rods 39 to compress a flange 45 on the rods against a gasket 46 to effect a gas tight seal at thepoint where the rods pass through the cover plate. The stack 4| extends from somewhat'below the cover plate Hi to adjacent the blades 33 and is of a diameter substantially slightly greater than that of the upper blades 34.

When the container is provided with a supply of a powdered material such as lithium carbonate, and the'shaft 24 rotated, the blades serve to agitate the powders and raise them upwardly through the stack 4|. To assist in this elevation of the powders the blades 29 to 3 4 are spaced about the shaft 24 in different angular positions as shown in Figs. 1 and 4, in such manner that the blades pass a given vertical plane in succession from the lowermost to the uppermost as the shaft revolves. In consequence there is a continuous lifting force from the bottom of thecontainer to above the upper blades whereby the mass of powder elevated by the lower blades 2.9

' is then picked up by the blades 30 and passed through the container as described below. The

increase in pitch of the blades propels the powder upwardwith gradually increasing velocity so that as it leaves the uppermost blade it is thrown to the top of the stack in a fine suspension in the air or gas in the chamber.

A suitable supply of air or other gas under pressure is directed into the chamber |3 through a conduit 41 extending through the base casting i6 and into an aperture 48 in the gland closure posed adjacent the top of the container. The inspirator serves to draw the gas laden with the powdered material from the container through the conduit 58, the stream ,of powder laden gas then being directed, through a conduit 59 to the furnace or other treating chamber.

.The combined action of the gas passing upwardly through the powder as it is broken up by 4| and the chamber 3, which suspension is drawn out by the action of the inspirator 51 in a very fine and uniform stream, the magnitude of which can be very accurately regulated by controlling the flow of gas into the chamber l3 as by means of the valve 60.

In order that the container |3 may be readily replenished with powder, a removable cover 6| is provided for the upper closure member 8, this cover being held against an annular gasket 62 whereby to effect a gas tight sealby means of a clamping screw 63 threaded into a yoke member 64 disposed beneath pins 64 and 65 carried by lugs 56 protruding from the upper surface of the closure member IS. The container may be operated until the powder therein is reduced to a' point between the lower blades'29 and 30 after which it is desirable to refill it in order to main- .tain the uniform flow thereof from the chamher. It may be refilled to a point at about the level of the upper blade 33 in order to provide sufiicient room in the upper portion of the chamber for the cloudlike suspension of the powders.

belts,

' It should benoted that the inlet for the air into the chamber |3 is disposed adjacent the shaft below the lower. labyrinth member so that the incoming air stream prevents migration of the powdered material toward the gland 23. The

operation ofthe blade 29 also is such that it does not tend to force powder into the labyrinth seal between the lower blade and the upper gland closing member 31. This is. important since the powder if permitted to migrate into the gland combines with the grease therein and hardens the gland so that it may score the shaft or cause heating sufficiently to freeze the shaft in the gland. Since the pressure in the chamber I3 plate 31. The gas thus passes upward about the shaft 24 and out into the container between the labyrinth seal members. The gas is supplied by a compressor 49 driven by a belt 50 from the motor 28, a suitable strainer or air cleaner 5| being disposed on the intake side of the compressor. The gas, preferably under pressure of from two to four pounds, is directed by a conduit 52 into a suitable cleaner 53 where the oil and moisture acquired during compression are removed. The gas leaves the cleaner 53 through the conduit 54 and is passed by a conduit 55 and the aperture 41 into the base of the chamber 3. A portion of the gas is also directed by a .conduit 56 through the nozzle 51 of an inspirator dismay build up to an abnormal pressure, as for instance, due to stoppage of the outlet conduit 59, a check valve 10 is providedon the conduit 54 to prevent any backward flow ,of air or gas,

through the labyrinth seal, upon stopping of the compressor. Such backward fiow' if permitted would tend to carry the powdered material through the seal and into the gland 23. It should be noted that the ball bearings 25 and 26 are disposed entirely' out of the container so that they will not be subject to clogging or abrasion by the powders in the chamber.

While lithium carbonate has been specifically referred to herein as one material which may be inspirated by the above described apparatus, it is to be understood that any other form of powdered material which may be retained in suspension in air or gas for a sufficient interval to enable its conveyance into the treating chamber to be effected, may be utilized, and therefore, it is not desired to be limited to any specific materials. It is to be understood, of course, that the pitch and speed of operation of the blades may be varied to suit the particular material being conveyed and the pressure of air or gas modified to obtain the most efficient operation with a particular material. Therefore, I do not desire to be limited to the specific details, construction and operation shown and described, but contemplate such modifications thereof as are within the skill of a mechanic, as coming within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a device for the atomization of pulverulent material, the combination of a closed receptacle for pulverulent material, a revolvable shaft extending into said receptacle, a plurality of blades carried thereby and positioned one above the other, said blades being progressively disposed about said shaft, fromthe lowermost to theupperm st, in angular spaced relation counter to the direction of rotation of the shaftand being pitched so as to cause an upward movement of said material when the shaft is revolved, means for admitting a gaseous medium into said receptacle adjacent the bottom thereof and means disposed adjacent the upper portion of said receptacle for permitting egress of said gaseous medium laden with said pulverulent material.

2. In a device of the character described, a receptacle for pulverulent material, a, plurality of revolvable blades disposed one above the other for lifting said material, the pitch of said blades increasing towards the uppermost one thereof whereby to produce an increasing upward thrust on said material as it is elevated through the 1 receptacle, means for admitting a gaseous medium into said receptacle and means disposed adjacent the upper portion of said receptacle for permitting egress of said gaseousmedium. l

3. In a device of the character described, a receptacle for pulverulent material, a plurality of revolvable blades disposed one above the other, the pitch of the 'uppermost'blade being greater than that of the lowermost blade so as to increase the upward thrust on the material, means for admitting a gaseous medium into said receptacle and means disposed adjacent the upper portion of said receptacle for permitting egress of said gaseous medium.

4. In a device for the atomization of pulverulent material, the combination of a receptacle for said pulverulent material, a plurality of revolvable lifting blades disposed one above the other in said receptacle, said blades decreasing in length upwardly of the chamber, means for removing a portion of said material from the upper part of the receptacle and a tacle of said gaseous medium laden with said whereby the stream is directed upwardly through said cylinder and means disposed adjacent the upper end of the cylinder for removing a part of the elevated material from the receptacl in an atomized stream.

6. In a device for the atomization ofpulverulent material, the combination of a closed receptacle for said pulverulent material, a plurality of revolvable lifting devices vertically offset andspaced in progressive angular positions about the axis of the receptacle from the lower one to the upper one of said devices for causing an upward movement of said material, means for admitting a gaseous medium under pressure into said receptacle adjacent the bottom thereof and means disposed adjacent the upper portion of said receptacle for permitting egress from said receppulverulent material.

7. In a device for the atomization of pulverulent material, the combination of a closed receptacle therefor, a revolvable shaft extending into said receptacle, a plurality of vertically spaced lifting blades carried thereby and angularly spaced relative to each other about said shaft,

the spacing and pitch of said blades being so related as to cause a substantially continuous upward movement of said material when the shaft is revolved, means for admitting a gaseous medium into said receptacle adjacent the bottom thereof and means disposed adjacent the upper portion of said receptacle for permitting egress of said gaseous medium laden with said pulverulent material.

8. In a device for the atomization of pulverulent material, the combination of a closed receptacle therefor, rotary lifting means in said partition in the upper part of said receptacle for.

above the other and offset in different angular positions, said blades increasing in pitch-and decreasing in length towards the upper blade, a cylinder disposed in said receptacle spaced from the top and side walls thereof and having its lower end surrounding the uppermost blades receptacle for causing upward movement of said material through said receptacle, means for confining said upward movement to the central part of said receptacle adjacent the top thereof, means independent of said lifting means for introducing gas into said receptacle at the base thereof and means for removing said gas and a portion of said material from the upper part of said receptacle. I

9. In a device for the atomization of pulverulent material, the combination of a closed receptacle comprising a storage chamber for a mass of pulverulent material, a partition spaced from both the upper and lower walls of said receptacle, rotary means extending along one side of said partition for producing an upward movement of a portion of said material from said mass from the lower part to the upper part of said receptacle along one side of said partition and a downward movement thereof from the upper part to the lower part of the receptacle along the other side of said partition, means for introducing a gas under pressure into said receptacle below said partition and means for removing aportion of said gas laden with said pulverulent material from the receptacle at apoint adjacent the upper end of said partition.

10. In a device for the atomization of pulverulent material, the combination of a closed receptacle for a mass of said material, a cylindrical partition spaced from the upper, lower. and side walls of said receptacle, rotary means extending into said cylindrical partition for producing an upward movement of material from said mass through said cylindrical partition and a downward movement thereof around the outer side of said partition, means for introducing a gas into said receptacle below said partition and means for removing a portion of said gas laden with said pulverulent material from the receptacle adiacent the upper end of said partition.

'11. In a' device of the character described, a closed receptacle for pulverulent material, movable means disposed in said receptacle for agitat ing and lifting said material, means independent of said agitating means for supplying air or gas under pressure to said receptacle adjacent the bottom thereof and means connected adjacent the top of said receptacle for conducting a stream of said air or gas laden with said pulverulent material from said receptacle.

12. In a device of the character described, a closed receptacle for pulverulent material, revolvable blades disposed in said receptacle, said blades having a pitch such as to lift said material, means for supplying air or gas under pressure to said receptacle adjacent the bottom thereof and means connected adjacent the top of said recep- 1 tacle for conducting a stream of said air or gas through a wall of the receptacle, means on said shaft acting on the body of powdered material for elevating said material in the receptacle to produce a suspension thereof in the air above said material, means external of said receptacle for driving said shaft, means providing a gas tight connection between said shaft and the wall of said receptacle, and means adjacent the top of said receptacle for withdrawing powder laden air or gas from said receptacle.

14. In adevice of the character described, a closed receptacle for powdered material comprising an upright cylinder, removable closure membars for each end of said cylinder, means for laden with said pulverulent material from said receptacle.

13. In a device of the character described, a closed receptacle for powdered material, means for introducing'air or gas into said receptacle adjacent the bottom thereof, a shaft extending

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2549033 *Sep 11, 1946Apr 17, 1951Air ReductionApparatus for feeding powdered material
US2761997 *Jun 15, 1950Sep 4, 1956Magnaflux CorpApparatus for detecting surface discontinuities
US4662311 *Jan 24, 1986May 5, 1987Fuji Xerox Company, LimitedDeveloping device
US4990959 *Jul 21, 1989Feb 5, 1991Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.One-component developing apparatus with improved toner layer regulating member
Classifications
U.S. Classification406/135
International ClassificationB01F3/06, B01F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB01F3/06
European ClassificationB01F3/06