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Publication numberUS2298545 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 13, 1942
Filing dateOct 19, 1939
Priority dateOct 19, 1939
Publication numberUS 2298545 A, US 2298545A, US-A-2298545, US2298545 A, US2298545A
InventorsWaters Harry F
Original AssigneeWaters Harry F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coffee package
US 2298545 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. F. WATERS COFFEE PACKAGE Oct. 13, 1942.

Filed Oct. 19, 1959 @5% y. Mm m 5 MN /m/m m/dN n. 1W f A M M2M EM V/ 1 m if H Patented Oct. 13, 1942 corral: rAoxAcr. Harry F. waters, New roi-aN. Y.

Application October 19, 1939, Serial No. 300,099

(c1. sis-171) 2 Claims.

My present invention relates to improvements in the manufacture of bags and the like and more particularly to the manufacture of` bags for the packaging of coiee and similar commodities which give oif gases on standing and which tend to deteriorate rapidly when exposed to air. This invention relates specifically to the packaging of food commodities which evolve carbon dioxide gas.

Although my invention will hereinafter be described with relation to the packaging of coee, it is to be understood that the principles of vthe invention may be applied to the packaging of otherV products. Y As will hereinafter be more particularly described, one of the principal objects of my present invention is to provide, in a package o f the type above described, means wherebycarbon dioxide gas evolved by the packaged commodity may be dispersed into the air. at a rate suillcient to prevent the commodity Afrom creating an internal pressure within the package suflicient to cause it to become distorted or ruptured.

Another-object of my present invention is to provide, in a package of the type above described,^means whereby carbon dioxide gas evolved by the packaged commodity may be dispersed into the air at a rate suicient to prevent the commodity from creating an internal pressure within the package suilicient to cause it to become distorted, distended, or ruptured, said means also having the characteristic of preventing flow of air therethrough. It will be appreciated that although the said means will not absolutely prevent the passage of air, it will reduce the rate of ow thereof to a point where it becomes negligible insofar as its effect on the packaged commodity is concerned.

A still further object of my present invention is' to provide, in a package of the type above described, a bag made of rubber or analogous material in which the commodity is packaged so that the carbon dioxide liberated by said commodity may be dispersed into the air at a rate sumcient to prevent the formation of an internal pressure which will distort, distend or rupture the package. The use of a rubber bag will also prevent air from adversely aiecting the packaged commodity.

These and other objects of the present invention will become more apparent from a study of the following description and by reference to the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. l is a schematic 'vertical sectional view of a package embodying the principles of the presentA invention;

Fig. 2 is a viewsimllar to Fig. l but showing a modified form of the invention; v`and Fig. 3 isa view similar to Fig. 1-but showing another modification of the present invention.

, Referring now to the drawing in which like numerals indicate like parts, and, more particularly to the modification disclosed in Fig. 1, I have shown schematically a bag or package comprising a plurality of nested tubes each provided with a suitably formed bottom ofA any of the conventional types. The outer ply I0 is preferably made of paper, the intermediate ply Il of rubber, and.

the inner ply I2 of glassine or other suitable grease resisting material. After the coffee I3 has beenpackaged the closure I4, of the inner ply'l is closed but is not sealed, while the intermediate and outer plies are sealed to provide an air-tight closure 15. l Y

The particular type of top closure used is not essential to the present invention. 5 However, in the case of a coffee package the bottom is of the automatic opening or ABC type. It will be noted that the top closure is formed by sealing rubber surfaces together as, for example, by the use of heat and/0r pressure. Preferably the top closure used by me is that disclosed and claimed in my copending application Serial No. 294,576, lled September 13, 1939.

The package which I have just described affords many advantages in the packaging of those materials which give oi gases on standing and which deteriorate rapidly when exposed `to air as, for example, coffee. The rubber used in making the intermediate ply I I may be uncured' and provided with a talc surface in order to prevent blockingJ It may be partially cured or it may be given a quick surface dip to provide a non-blocking surface. Rubber, however, which has been so cured as to remove substantially all stretch does not permit the passage of carbon dioxide gas therethrough at a rate to make its use commercially practicable. Rubber compounds such as halogenated rubber, rubber hydrochloride, etc. have an internal structure such as to prevent its use in the packaging ofcoiee in accordance with the principles of my present invention for the aromatic oils which become rancid when exposed to the oxygen of the air.

Thus by the use of a rubber ply sealing or `undue distortion of the package will not take at the same time air will not contact with the coil'ee.

'I'he use of the inner glassine or other grease resisting material as the inner ply is likewise advantageous since the volatile oils would otherwise tend to strike through and spoil and deteriorate the rubber. This inner ply in reality constitutes merely a liner or protecting medium for the rubber and of course need not be sealed and preferably is not sealed.

In some cases it is desirable to package the coffee in a plurality of small units contained within a large package. For example, assuming that the package disclosed in Fig. 2'is a one pound coffee package, each individual unit will contain one quarter pound coifee. The package of Fig. 2 is of the same general construction as that disclosed in Fig. l. 'I'he outer ply IB is made from paper, the intermediate ply I1 from rubber. In order to form-the individual units each one quarter pound is placed within an inner bag formed from glassine or some other suitable grease resisting material. As in the case of Fig. l the closure I9 of each individual unit is not sealed. The closure 20 for the package proper is formed in the same manner as the closure I disclosed in Fig. l. s

Referring now to Fig. 3 I have shown an alternate method of makingthe package and it will be noted that although the outer ply 2| is made from paper, each individual unit is encasedirst in a container 22 formed from rubber within which is a container 23 formed from glassine or other suitable grease-resisting material. The closures of the glassine container again are not sealed; whereas the closures for the rubber containers are sealed. The package is provided with a conventional form of closure 25.

It will be noted that in each form of the invention the ply formed from glassine or other grease-resisting material is not sealed, rst, because there is no need for sealing and, second, because it permits a ready escape of the carbon dioxide gas through the closure so as to preclude any possibility of distention or distortion of the package through the creation of internal pressure within the coil'ee package.

Although my present invention has been described with respect to three forms thereof it will be appreciated that the package may be constructed in a number of ways. depending upon the desire of the particular manufacturer and purchaser. The essential feature of the invention is to encase the coffee in a rubber container which will permit carbon dioxide gas evolved by the coifee to pass therefrom at a rate sumcient to prevent distortion of the package and at the same time block the ingress of air into the package. By maintaining the coii'ee out of contact with the air the coffee will not become rancid.

Having now described my invention as required by the patent statutes, what I claim as new is:

l. A package particularly adapted for coffee which evolves a gas upon standing and which is subject to deterioration upon exposure to air, including a container made from flexible, partially cured sheet rubber, coffee disposed within said container, and a closure formed in said container, said closure being substantially impervious to air, and said rubber being so partially cured asto be substantially impervious to air 'and relatively pervious to the gas evolved by said coiee whereby said container will substantially exclude air from saidv packagmand will permit the gas evolved by said coiee to escape at a rate sumciently rapid to avoid creation offsubstantial gaseous pressure within said container and to prevent bursting thereof.

2. A package particularly adapted for coiiee which evolves a gas upon standing and which is subject to deterioration upon exposure to air, including a container having an outer ply of paper, an intermediate ply of partially cured sheet rubber, an inner ply of greaseproof sheet material,

` Ycoee disposed within said container, the mouth of said inner ply being closed but unsealed and the mouth of said intermediate ply being closed substantially impervious to air and the rubber of said intermediate ply being so partially cured as to be substantially impervious to air and relatively pervious to the gas evolved by said coffee whereby said container will substantially exclude air from said package and will permit the gas evolved by said coifee to escape at a rate suilleiently rapid to avoid creation of substantial gas'- eous pressure within said container and to prevent bursting thereof.

HARRY F. WATERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2430663 *Aug 14, 1944Nov 11, 1947Sidney Behrman AbrahamPackaging of coffee
US2511987 *Dec 13, 1945Jun 20, 1950Fisher Charles DMethod for treatment of and package for dried fruit
US2571340 *Apr 8, 1949Oct 16, 1951Wingfoot CorpPackaging
US2600069 *Jun 25, 1949Jun 10, 1952Morrison Willard LFood package
US2628908 *Sep 5, 1947Feb 17, 1953John J HoranLiquid infant food in marketable dispensers
US2628910 *Sep 5, 1947Feb 17, 1953John J HoranMethods and devices for merchandising and dispensing liquid infant food
US2628911 *Sep 5, 1947Feb 17, 1953Horan John JMethods and devices for merchandising and directly dispensing liquid infant food
US2628912 *Sep 5, 1947Feb 17, 1953John J HoranDevices for packaging liquid infant food
US3077409 *Jul 2, 1958Feb 12, 1963American Can CoCoffee package
US4038428 *Dec 22, 1975Jul 26, 1977Davis George B JunMethod of packaging piecrust dough
US4343427 *Mar 18, 1980Aug 10, 1982Sonoco Products CompanyComposite container with balloon fold
US4799590 *Feb 2, 1987Jan 24, 1989Furman Theodore JPackage and method of packaging
US4883675 *Nov 30, 1988Nov 28, 1989The Procter & Gamble CompanyFlexible package having main compartment and ancillary compartment
US20080017655 *Jul 19, 2006Jan 24, 2008Martel Shelly AFood container assembly
DE1037954B *Nov 24, 1956Aug 28, 1958August KlemmeGeschlossene Verpackung fuer Schuettgut aller Art, z. B. Seifenpulver, Zucker, Griess, Bohnen
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/127, 206/499, 206/525, 229/164.1, 426/108, 229/164.2, 426/118, 206/526
International ClassificationB65D77/06, B65D30/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65D31/02, B65D77/062
European ClassificationB65D31/02, B65D77/06B