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Publication numberUS2298951 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 13, 1942
Filing dateApr 4, 1941
Priority dateApr 4, 1941
Publication numberUS 2298951 A, US 2298951A, US-A-2298951, US2298951 A, US2298951A
InventorsLohr Raymond J, Nelson Carver Richard
Original AssigneeMarx & Co Louis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bombing airplane toy
US 2298951 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct; 13, 1942. R. J. LOHR EIAL 2,298,951

BOMBING AIRPLANE TOY Filed April 4, 1941 s Sheets-Sheet 1 RAYt l l f g g OHR gamma NELO'N CARVER M ATTORNE S Oct. 13, 1942. R. J. LOHR' ETAL 2,293,951

BQMBING AIRPLANE TOY Filed April 4, 1941 s Sheets-Sheet 2 INVE RAYMON TE LOI-I R +C ARD NELSON CARVER ATTORNE S Oct. 13, 1942. R. J, LOHR ETAL BOMBING AIRPLANE TOY Filed April 4, 1941 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 S RAYWE'B Q LOHR |IYC ARD NELSON CARVER ATTORNEY Patented Oct. 13, 1942 BOMBING AIRPLANE TOY Raymond J. Lohr and Richard Nelson Carver, Erie, Pa., assignors to Louis Marx & Company, Inc., New York, N. Y.', a corporation offNew York Application April 4, 194-1, Serial No. 386,784

20 Claims.

This invention relates to toys, more particularly flying toys, and especially such a toy arranged to simulatedly drop objects under remote control.

The primary object of our invention is to gen erally improve flying toys, and more particularly airplane toys. Other objects are to provide for simulated bomb-dropping under remote control; to provide a substantial magazine for a considerable number of balls or simulated bombs while dealing with a comparatively small toy; to provide for reloading of the toy with balls or simulated bombs while the toy is still in operation; and to accomplish the foregoing and other desired objects while using a comparatively simple construction which is wholly mechanical and which has. no need for electric Wiring, magnets, or the like.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and such otherobjects as will hereinafter appear, our invention consists in the flying and ball-dropping toy elements and their relation one to the other as hereinafter are more particularly described in the specification and sought to be defined in the claims. The specification is accompanied by drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a toy embodying features of our invention;

Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the same;

Fig. 3 is a section taken in elevation through the toy;

Fig. 4 shows a detail, looking in the direction of the arrows 44 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5- is a section taken in the plane of the line 55-of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a similar section with the parts relatively moved to bomb-dropping position;

Fig. 7 is a section taken in the plane of the line 1-1 of Fi 3;

Fig. 8 is an inverted horizontal section taken in the plane of the line 88 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 9 is explanatory of a detail;

Fig. lO'is a section'taken in the plane of the line lillil of Fig. 3, and shows an elevatable disk for controlling the bomb-dropping operation;

Fig. 11 is a view similar to a part of Fig. 2, but showing. a modification;

Fig. 12 is a section generally similar to Fig. 3, but showing another modification;

Fig. 13 as a transverse section taken approximately in the plane of the line l3l3 of Fig. 12;

Fig. 14 is a transverse section taken approximately in the plane of the line I l-I4 of Fi 12;

Fig. 15 is a transverse sectiontaken approximately in the plane of the line 15-15 of Fig. 12

Fig. 16. isLa. view similar to Fig. 14, but drawn to enlargedscale, andshowing. the relation of the parts 'Whenin the bomb-dropping position;

Fig. 1'7 i518, section similar'to Fig. 15', but showing the relation of the parts whentin the bombdropping position;

Fig. 18 is a developmentdrawn to enlarged scale, and showing the shape of a piece of sheet metal forming a part of the'invention; and

Fig. 19 is a section through a target.

Referring to. the drawings, and more particularly-to Figs.- 1 and 2, thetoy comprises a small airplane simulation I2 carried at the outer end of an arm I4 which in turn is rotatably carried at the upper end of a pylon or tower 16. Tower [Bis mounted on ab ase I8-'which in the present case, is circular, although other shapes may be used. A plurality of target areas 20, 22, 24, 26, 28 and 30 are defined on base l8. These may be pockets or depressions in a raised base, or as here illustrated, may consist of peripheral or fence-like walls secured to the base and forming enclosures in which it is sought to drop a bomb. The'base may be printed or lithographed to simulate a landscape with roads, a railroad, and other appropriate markings, the target areas, for example, simulating a factory, an ammunition dump, and other such militaryobjectives.

The airplane supporting arm I4 is driven by a motor which in the' present case, is an ordinary toy spring motor housed in an enclosure 32 mounted on base l8'- and extending .beneath the tower IS. The motor may be wound by means of key 34; and may be stopped or started by means of a control lever 36"(Fig. 1). An additional control lever is providedat 38, and operation of this lever causes simulated release of a bomb from the airplane, the object, of course,

being to drop the bob successfully within a tar- 1 get area while'the airplane is in motion travelling about the tower. The target areas may be given numerical'score values, thus providing a competitive game inwhich each operator may seek maximum score.

Considering the structure in greater detail, and referring now to Figs. 3 through '10 of the drawings, the airplane support arm 14 comprises concentric tubes 43-and42. These are provided near their outer ends with bomb discharge openings 44 and 46, which openings are normally out of registration. thus preventing the dropping of a ball or simulated bomb 48, .as is best shown in Fig. 5. However, by relative movement of tubes 40 and 42, the openings -44'and"46 may be brought into registration, thus permitting the discharge of a ball through the openings. In the present structure, the relative movement is a rotative or rocking movement, and it is convenient to turn the outer tube 45 while keeping the inner tube 42 stationary. Moreover, in the present structure the inner tube 42 acts as a magazine for carrying a substantial supply of balls, this magazine being shown only partially full in Fig. 3. The magazine may be loaded by adding balls at the top of the tower 56, as is indicated by the ball 50 shown in broken lines in Fig. 3. This loading operation is easy even when the toy is in operation, because the opening 52 is located directly over the vertical shaft 54 which causes rotation of the airplane supporting arm I4. The arm 14 preferably slopes downwardly, as shown in Fig. 3, so that the balls when dropped through the opening 52 tend to move toward the outer end of the arm to the controllable discharge opening 44. It is probably not essential to slope the support arm, because the outward movement of the balls is anyway aided by centrifugal force during operation of the toy. However, the slope is desirable as it facilitates loading of the magazine when the toy is not running.

The partial rotation of the outer tube 40 for causing the bomb-dropping operation is produced by the control lever 38 previously referred to. In Fig. 8, it will be seen that lever 33 is pivoted at 56, While its opposite end 58 is connected to the lower end of a vertically reciprocable rod til. Referring now to Figs. 3, '7 and 10, it will be seen that a disk 52 is rigidly affixed to the upper end of rod 55, as by riveting the same at 554. Disk 52 has a relatively large hole 66 (Fig. 19) at the center, so that there is no interference with raising or lowering of the disk between a bottom position shown in Fig. 3, and a top position shown in Fig. '7.

The outer tube 40 of the airplane support arm i4 is provided with a finger 68, best shown in Fig. 9, which projects outwardly and is adapted to ride over the disk 62, as shown in Figs. 3 and 7. The finger may be formed in any desired manner, and in the present case, is an integral part of tube 40. The finger is normally urged downwardly, or in one direction, by appropriate resilient means, here exemplified by a spring wire 10, the free end of which bears downwardly on finger 68, and the fixed end of which is stationarily secured to the inside of a frustoconical cap 12 which rotates with the airplane support arm. It will be evident that the tubes 45 and 42 therefore normally assume the relation shown in Fig. 3, but upon depression of bomb-control lever 33, the disk 62 is raised, thereby raising the outer end of finger 68, as shown in Fig. 7, and so oscillating the outer tube from the normal position shown in Fig. 5, to the bomb-dropping position shown in Fig. 6, whereupon the endmost ball is dropped.

In order to prevent the entire magazine-load of balls from being dropped, even though the lever 38 may be held depressed, we prefer toprovide suitable check means for insuring the dropping of only one ball for each operation of the control lever. In the present case, this means consists of a loop of spring wire 14 which operates in slots cut through the outer and inner tubes, as will be seen in Figs. 3, 5, and 6. In the normal position of the outer tube, shown in Fig. 5, the spring wire check 14 bears against an edge or lip 765 of the inner tube, thereby raising or flattening the loop and so keeping it out of the path of the balls in the inner tube.

When, however, the

outer tube is turned to the bomb-dropping position shown in Fig. 6, the spring wire check 14 moves away from the lip 15, and bends to the position shown in Fig. 6, at which time it is disposed in the path of the next ball 16. As will be seen in Fig. 3, the check 14 is preferably located between the endmost ball 48 and the next succeeding ball 16, thereby insuring the dropping of only one ball or simulated bomb at a time, that is, for each operation of the bomb-dropping lever 38.

In the structure here illustrated, the flying toy, which simulates an airplane, is mounted directly on the outer tube (see Figs. 1 and 2). Specifically, one wing of the airplane is fastened directly on outer tube 40. In consequence of this, the airplane is turned with the outer tube during the bomb-dropping operation. Thus the airplane noses downwardly, as is indicated by the broken line position l2 in Fig. 7. Because of this construction, the check 14 previously referred to may be secured to the Wing 80 of the airplane. This, however, is not essential, as a suitable lug may be struck from the outer tube to hold the spring check 14.

Referring now to Figs. 3 and 8, the spring motor for driving the toy may be of generally conventional character, that here illustrated comprising a winding stem 82 for winding a spiral spring schematically indicated at 84, which in turn drives a main gear 86 meshing with an idler gear 88, which in turn meshes with a pinion secured to the lower end of the vertical shaft 54 extending axially through the tower H5. The motor is also provided with governor means to limit its speed, and in the present case, the governor is driven by a train of step-up gearing comprising pinion 92, gear 94, pinion 96, gear 98, and pinion H39, the latter turning an eccentrically mounted weight I02, this acting as a simple form of speed limiting governor. The weight I02 may also be used for cooperation with the stopping and starting lever 35 previously referred to, said lever being pivoted at [54, and having an end I06 adapted to be moved into or out of the path of the rotatable weight I02.

The rotatable shaft 54 carries a fitting H0 (Figs. 3 and 9) at its upper end, which fitting may conveniently be made by die-casting. The fitting has a sleeve-like portion H2 into which the stationary inner tube 42 is secured. It may be inserted with a force or press fit, or may be secured, as here illustrated, by the use of bent tongues H4 (see Fig. 4) which are formed at the end of tube 42 and pass through slots in the fitting. The fitting I H], of course, includes the bomb-loading opening 52, and the top of tube 42 is cut away beneath opening 52, as is clearly shown in Fig. 3, for passage of balls dropped into opening 52.

The outer tube 40 is ro-tatably carried on the inner tube 42, and terminates at the sleeve portion H2 of fitting H0. The outer tube 40 is held against outward movement by means of tongues I [6 formed on inner tube 42, and bent outwardly beyond the end of the outer tube, as is best shown in Fig. 7. A lug H8 (Fig. 3) is preferably bent inwardly on the inner tube 42 in order to limit movement of the balls, that is, to prevent them from escaping from the lower end of the tube.

The frusto-conical cap 12 is fitted with a pressed fit over the upper end of fitting I ID. The cap is cut away at one side to pass around the airplane support arm l4.

The pylon or tower l6 consists. of a cylinder of. sheet metal, closed at the top by a circular yond the outer tube I26, and the airplane I28 is mounted on the extension I22. The wing I38 of the airplane is disposed above but is in no way secured to the outer tube I26. With this structure, the bomb-dropping operation is controlledexactly as previously described, but the airplane does not dip or turn withthe outer tubewhen a bomb is being dropped.

A modified form of the invention is illustrated in Figs. 12 through I8. Hereagain the flying toy simulates an airplane, and the dropped objects simulate bombs. In this modified form of the invention, however, the arm comprises a single tube I32, instead oftwo concentric tubes. The tube i32- acts asa magazine for bomb-simulating balls, and the inner end of the tube is cutaway, as indicated at 34, for admission of the balls through a top-opening I36 formed in a preferablydie-cast member I38, said member-being secured at the upper end of an uprightmotordrivenshaft I 46 similar to thatpreviously-described.

The tubular arm I32 may be held locked inthe die-cast member I38 by means of tongues I39 which are formed at the inner end of the tube I32 and pass through mating slots in the die-cast member I38, the ends of the tongues beingappropriately bentto lock thetube in position. The

tube preferably slopes downwardly somewhat to insure gravitational movement of the balls to the outer end of the arm.

A- part of the metal tube cut away at I34 is bent upwardly to form a bearing I42. At the outer end, a part of the metal of thetube is bent upwardly to form a companion bearing I44 (Figs. 12 and 13). These bearings have round holes dimensioned to rotatably receivea preferably squarerod I46, the rod I46 functioning to control the dropping of the bombs and thetilting of the airplane. The inner end of rod I46 is bent-to form a finger I48 (Figs. 12 and 15), the lower end of which is curled to form a rounded surface which is slidable on a vertically movable disc I58. Disc I58, as before, is mounted-on a described. It will be evident that when the discis raised from the position shown in Fig. 15 to that shown in Fig. 17, the finger I48 and with it the rod I46 is rocked in clockwise direction.

Atits outer end, the rod I46 carries a special sheet metal part which preferably functions for three purposes. One is to carry the airplane simulation, generally designated I54. Another is to-release the balls from-arm I32. The third is to prevent the dropping of more than one ball ata time. In the present case, the balls are dis.- charged through an opening I56 in the bottom of the tube, and are normally-prevented'from dropping by a suitable stop finger I58, the lower end of which is normally disposed beneath the opening I56, and the upper end of which-is connected to the rod I46. Rocking of rod I46 changes the finger I58 from theposition shown-in IiII Figs. 13 and 14, to the positionshown in Fig. 16, thereby releasing the endmost ball I611.

The remaining balls are held back by a suitable check I62, the lower end of whichis movable into the tubular arm I32 through an appropriate slot cut across the upper part of the tube. The check I62 is normally disposed outside the path of the balls moving through the tube, as is shown in Figs. 13 and 14, but when the rod I46 is rocked to bomb-discharging position, the check.

I62 moves into the tube, as is clearly shown in Fig. 16. It is then disposed between the endmost ball I58 which is being dropped, (see Fig. 12), and the next to the endmost ball I64;

The sheet metal part secured at the outer end of rod I46 is preferably made of a single. piece of metal patterned as shownin Fig. 18. This comprises not only the bomb-stopping finger I58,

and the check I62, but also an ear I66 having a- Another.

square hole I68 cut therethrough. square hole I18 is cut through a part of the check I62. The stop finger I58, the check I62, and the ear I66 are all bent downwardly on the dotted lines shown in Fig. 18, and two tongues I12 may be bent upwardly on the dotted lines shown. These tongues pass through mating slots in one of the wings I14 (Figs. 12 and 16) of the airplane, and are then bent over to secure the air.- plane firmly tothe flat toparea I16 of the fitting.

The balls are prevented from running out of the outer end of tube I32 by means of a suitable stop lug I18 which may be struck inwardly from the top of the tube, as is best shown in Figs. 12 and 13.

It will be understood that the form of the invention here disclosed functions in the same way as that previously described in connection with Figs. 1 through 10 of the drawings, but the parts of the present structure are simpler and more economical to manufacture.

Several additional points may be mentioned. The top wall I88 of the tower is flanged upwardly at I82, thereby substantially concealing the, ver- The propeller of the airplane is simulated by a circular disc of transparent Celluloid I86. Such a disc-has the merit of simulating a rapidly revolving propeller in a very simple. way.

The target areas or rings may be bounded by flanged parts, a section through one of which is shown in Fig. 19. There is a sheet metal wall I98 the upper edge of which is preferably reversely folded or curled, as indicated at I92, so as to eliminate exposed sharp edges. The bottom is flanged inwardly at I94, and provided with tongues I96 which pass through mating slots inthe base-I98 of the toy and are bent to lock the target ring on thebase.

It is believed thatthe. construction and oper-.

ation, as well as the advantages of our improved toy, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description thereof. The spring motor is wound by means of the key. A supply of balls may be loaded through the, toy opening. The. airplane is then set in motion by a movement of the starting lever. As the airplane-revolves over the base, the bomb-control lever may be depressed at intervals to drop a single bomb. If the bombs are dropped rapidly before unwinding of the motor, they may, if desired, be. reloaded while the airplane isin flight, or if desired, the airplanemay .be stopped .by meansof the starting; lever, and;

the bombs reloaded, before again starting the airplane.

For a competitive game, the target areas are preferably given score values, and each player may be allowed one magazine-full of balls, the object being to obtain a maximum total score with the available balls.

It will be apparent that while we have shown and described our invention in a preferred form, many changes and modifications may be made in the structure disclosed, without departing from the spirit of the invention as sought to be defined in the following claims. In the claims the reference to balls or bombs is not intended to exclude other droppable objects.

We claim:

1. A ball-dropping toy comprising a pylon or tower, a hollow arm rotatably mounted on said tower, a simulated flying toy mounted on said arm for simulated flight about the tower, an opening whereby balls may be loaded into said hollow arm for discharge at the flying toy, ballreleasing means at the end of said arm, a rigid mechanically movable operating means therefor extending along said arm and mounted for turning movement about its longitudinal axis, and a remote ball-control means for so turning said operating means about its longitudinal axis as to permit the dropping of a ball, without interfering with rotation of the arm and operating means about the tower.

2. A ball-dropping toy comprising a pylon or tower, an arm rotatably mounted on said tower, a flying toy simulation mounted on the arm, a magazine for balls, means to stop or release the balls at the flying toy, a finger secured to and projecting from the arm at the tower, means extending along the arm and connecting said finger to said ball-release means, a vertically movable disc at the tower for moving said finger, and thereby releasing a ball, and a remote control ball-dropping lever connected to said disc for moving said disc when it is desired to drop a ball.

3. A ball-dropping toy comprising a base, a tower extending upwardly therefrom, a hollow arm rotatably mounted at the top of the tower, a flying toy simulation carried at the outer end of said arm, an opening at the center of the top of the tower through which balls may be loaded into said arm, whereby said arm acts as a magazine for the balls, a motor mounted on said base for driving a shaft extending upwardly through the tower to the arm for rotating the arm, and a ball-control lever connected with appropriate control mechanism for releasing the balls.

4. A ball-dropping toy comprising a circular base, a tower extending upwardly therefrom, a tubular arm rotatably mounted at the top of the tower, a flying toy simulation carried at the outer end of said arm, an opening at the top of the tower through which balls may be loaded into said arm, whereby said arm acts as a magazine for the balls, a spring motor mounted on said base for driving a shaft extending upwardly through the tower to the arm for rotating the arm, a control lever for said motor, and a ballcontrol lever at the periphery of the base connected with appropriate control mechanism for releasing the balls one at a time.

5. A ball-dropping toy comprising a pylon or tower, an arm rotatably mounted on said tower, a flying toy simulation mounted on the arm, a magazine for balls, means to stop or to release the balls at the flying toy, a finger secured to and projecting from the arm at the tower, means extending along the arm and connecting said finger to said ball-release means, a vertically movable disc at the tower for moving said finger and thereby releasing a ball, a base for said tower, a motor connected to a shaft extending up the tower to the arm for rotating the arm, and a ball-control lever at the outer edge of the base connected to said disc to move the same.

6. A ball-dropping toy comprising a base, a tower extending upwardly therefrom, an arm rotatably mounted on said tower, a flying toy simulation tiltably carried at the outer end of the arm, a magazine for balls, a motor driving a shaft extending upwardly through the tower to the arm for rotating the arm, ball-releasing means, means to prevent the .dropping of more than one ball at a time, and a single control lever arranged to both tilt the flying toy and to release a ball.

7. A ball-dropping toy comprising a base, a tower extending upwardly therefrom, an arm rotatably mounted on said tower, a flying toy simulation carried at the outer end of the arm and tiltable thereby, a magazine for balls, a motor driving a shaft extending upwardly through the tower to the arm for rotating the arm, ball-releasing means, means to prevent the dropping of more than one ball at a time, a finger projecting from the arm at the tower and arranged to control the operation of the ball releasing means, a vertically movable disc at the tower for moving said finger and thereby tilting the flying toy and releasing a ball, and a control lever connected to said disc to move the same.

8. A ball-dropping toy comprising a base, a tower extending upwardly therefrom and having an openly accessible top, a tubular arm rotatably mounted on said tower, a flying toy simulation carried at the outer end of the arm, an opening at the openly accessible top of the tower through which balls may be loaded into said arm, whereby said arm acts as a magazine for the balls, a motor driving a shaft extending upwardly through the tower to the arm for rotating the arm, ball-releasing means at the end of the arm, a check movable between the end-most and next to the end-most ball to prevent the dropping of more than one ball at a time, means extending along the arm to the ball-releasing means and the check means, and a control lever for moving said means and thereby releasing a ball.

9. A ball-dropping toy comprising a base, a tower extending upwardly therefrom, a tubular arm rotatably mounted on said tower, a flying toy simulation tiltably carried at the outer end of the arm, an opening at the top of the tower through which balls may be loaded into said arm, whereby said arm acts as a magazine for the balls, a motor driving a shaft extending upwardly through the tower to the arm for rotating the arm, ball-releasing means at the end of the arm, a check movable between the end-most and next to the end-most ball to prevent the dropping of more than one ball at a time, means extending along the arm to the ball-releasing means and the check means, and to the airplane in order to tilt the airplane during the ball-releasing operation, and a control lever to move the said means.

10. A ball-dropping toy comprising a base, a tower extending upwardly therefrom, a tubular arm rotatably mounted on said tower, a flying toy simulation carried at the outer end of the arm, an opening at the top of the tower through which balls may be loaded into said arm, whereby said arm actsasa magazine for the balls, a motor driving a. shaft. extending upwardly through the tower to the arm for-rotating the arm, ball-releasing means atthe end of the arm, a check movable betweenthe end-most and next to the end-most ball to prevent the dropping of more than one ball at atime, a finger projecting from the arm at the tower, means, extending along the arm and connecting said finger to the ball-releasing means and the check means, a-vertically movable disc at the tower-for moving said finger and thereby releasing a ball, and a control lever connected to said di c. to move the same.

11. A ball-dropping toy comprisinga base, a tower extending upwardly therefrom, a tubular arm rotatably mounted on said tower, a flying toy simulation tiltably carried at the outer end of the arm, an opening at the top of the'tower through which balls may be loaded into said arm, whereby said arm acts as a magazine for the balls, a motor driving a shaft extending upwardly through the tower to the arm for rotating the arm, ball-releasingmeans at the end of the arm, a check movable between the end-most and next to the end-most ball to prevent the dropping of more than one ball at a time, a finger projecting from the arm at the tower, means extending along the arm and connecting said finger to the ball-releasing means and the check means, and to the airplane in order to tilt the airplane during the ball-releasing operation, a vertically movable disc at the tower for moving said finger and thereby tilting the flying toy and releasing a ball, and a control lever connected to said disc to move the same.

12. A ball-dropping toy comprising a pylon or tower, an arm rotatably mounted on said tower, said arm comprising two concentric tubes, a toy mounted on said arm for simulated flight about the tower, an opening whereby balls may be loaded into said tubular arm for discharge at the flying toy, normally non-registering holes near the outer ends of said tubes, the arrangement being such that the holes may be brought into registration by turning one of said tubes relative to the other, and a remote ball-control means for so turning one of said tubes as to bring the holes into registration and thereby permit the dropping of a ball.

13. A ball-dropping toy comprising a pylon or tower, an arm rotatably mounted on said tower, said arm comprising two concentric tubes, a toy mounted on the arm for simulated flight, an

opening at the top of the tower leading to the inner tube for loading said tube with balls, normally non-registering holes near the outer ends of said tubes, the arrangement being such that the holes may be brought into registration by turning the outer tube until its hole comes in registry with the hole in the inner tube, a finger secured to and projecting from the outer tube at the tower, a vertically movable disc at the tower for moving said finger and thereby turning the outer tube, and a remote control ball-dropping lever connected to said disc for moving said disc when it is desired to drop a ball.

14. A ball-dropping toy comprising a pylon or tower, an arm rotatably mounted on said tower, said arm comprising two concentric tubes, a toy mounted on the outer tube for simulated flight, an opening leading to the inner tube for loading said tube with balls, normally non-registering holes at the outer ends of said tubes, the arrangement being such that the holes may be brought into registration by turning the outer tube until its hole comes in registry with the hole in themner tube, a finger secured to and projecting from the outer tube at the tower, a vertically movable disc at the tower for moving said finger and thereby turning the outer tube and with it the flying toy, and a remote control ball-dropping lever connected to said disc for moving said disc when it is desired to drop a ball.

15. A ball-dropping toy comprising a pylon or tower, an arm rotatably mounted on said tower, said arm comprising two concentric tubes, a toy mounted on the arm to simulate flight, an opening leading to the inner tube for loading said tube with balls, normally non-registering holes at the outer ends of said tubes, the arrangement being such that the holes may be brought into registration by turning the outer tube until its hole comes in registry with the hole in theinner tube, check means normally out-of the path of the balls in the inner tube for coming into their path behind the endmost ball when the outer tube is turned to discharge the endmostball, whereby only one ball is dropped at-a time, a finger secured to and projecting from the outer tube at the tower, a vertically movable disc at the tower for moving said finger and thereby turning the outer tube, and a remote control ball-dropping lever connected to said disc for moving said disc when it is desired to drop a ball.

16. A bombing airplane toy comprising a pylon or tower, an arm rotatably mounted on said tower, said arm comprising two concentric tubes, a toy airplane simulation mounted on the outer tube, an opening leading to the inner tube for loading said tube with bomb-simulating balls, normally non-registering holes at the outer ends of said tubes, the arrangement being such that the holes may be brought into registration by turning the outer tube until its hole comes in registry with the hole in the inner tube, a finger secured to and projecting from the outer tube at the tower, a vertically movable disc at the tower for moving said finger and thereby turning the outer tube and with it the airplane, the direction of rotation being such that the airplane noses downwardly during the bomb-dropping operation, a base for said tower, a motor connected to a shaft extending up the tower to the arm for rotating the arm, and a bomb-control lever at the outer edge of the base connected to said disc for moving the same.

17. A ball-dropping toy comprising a base, a tower, a motor-driven shaft extending upwardly through said tower, a tubular arm secured to the upper end of said shaft for rotation about the tower, an opening at the tower for loading said arm with balls, a rod extending along the arm, a ball-releasing lever for rocking the aforesaid rod, 2, flying toy simulation at the outer end of the arm, an opening at the end of the tubular arm, a ball-stopping finger connected to said rod and normally disposed beneath said opening but moved away from the opening when the rod is rocked, and a ball check finger secured to said rod and movable between the end-most and next to the end-most balls when the rod is rocked.

18. A ball-dropping toy comprising a base, a tower, a motor-driven shaft extending upwardly through said tower, a tubular arm secured to the upper end of said shaft for rotation about the tower, an opening at the tower for loading said arm with balls, a rod extending along the arm, a ball-releasing lever for rocking the aforesaid rod, a flying toy simulation at the outer end of the arm secured to said rod, an opening at the end of the tubular arm, a ball-stopping finger connected to said rod and normally disposed beneath said opening but moved away from the opening when the rod is rocked, and a ball check finger secured to said rod and movable between the end-most and next to the end-most balls when the rod is rocked.

19. A ball-dropping toy comprising a base, a tower, a motor-driven shaft extending upwardly through said tower, a tubular arm secured to the upper end of said shaft for rotation about the tower, an opening at the tower for loading said arm with balls, a rod extending along the arm, the inner end of said rod being bent to form a finger, a Vertically movable disc at said tower, a ball-releasing lever connected to said disc for raising the same and thereby raising the finger and rocking the aforesaid rod, a flying toy simulation at the outer end of the arm, an opening at the end of the tubular arm, a ball-stopping finger connected to said rod and normally disposed beneath said opening but moved away from the opening when the rod is rocked, and a ball check finger secured to said rod and movable between the end-most and next to the endmost balls when the rod is rocked.

20. A bombing airplane toy comprising a base, a tower, a motor-driven shaft extending upwardly through said tower, a tubular arm secured to the upper end of said shaft for rotation about the tower, an opening at the tower for loading said arm with bomb-simulating balls, a rod extending along the arm, the inner end of said rod being bent to form a finger, a vertically movable disc at said tower, a bomb-releasing lever connected to said disc for raising the same and thereby raising the finger and rocking the aforesaid rod, a toy airplane at the outer end of the arm secured to said rod, an opening at the end of the tubular arm, a ball-stopping finger connected to said rod and normally disposed beneath said opening but moved away from the opening when the rod is rocked, and a ball check secured to said rod and movable between the end-most and next to the end-most balls when the rod is rocked.

RAYMOND J. LOHR. RICHARD NELSON CARVER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2426551 *Oct 18, 1943Aug 26, 1947Arthur FrischAerial projectile game
US2440885 *Dec 18, 1944May 4, 1948Zamboni William EToy bombing device
US2466069 *Apr 19, 1945Apr 5, 1949George H BabigianBombing game
US2657930 *Mar 23, 1951Nov 3, 1953Reus John JToy bomber and bomb carrier and release mechanism
US3208751 *Mar 5, 1963Sep 28, 1965Charles KostkaGame apparatus with ball dropping means and rotating target
US4120497 *Feb 22, 1977Oct 17, 1978Goldfarb Adolph ETarget game with releasable objects and rotating target member
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/351
International ClassificationA63H27/00, A63F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0247, A63H27/004
European ClassificationA63H27/00C, A63F9/02F