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Publication numberUS2299009 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 13, 1942
Filing dateAug 9, 1941
Priority dateAug 9, 1941
Publication numberUS 2299009 A, US 2299009A, US-A-2299009, US2299009 A, US2299009A
InventorsDenk Albert J
Original AssigneeDenk Albert J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cushioned heel
US 2299009 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. J. DENK CUSHIONED HEEL Oct. 13, 1942.

Filed Aug. 9, 1941 NVENTOR.

r A ATTRNEYE Patented Oct. 13, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CUSHIONED HEEL Albert J. Denk, Delphi, Ind.

Application August 9, 1941, Serial No. 406,194

Claims.

My invention relates to shoes, and has among its objects and advantages the provision of an improved cushioned heel.

In the accompanying drawing:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a heel in accordance with my invention;

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 2-2 of Figure 1; and

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the heel detached from the shoe.

In the embodiment selected for illustration, a fragment I0 of aV conventional shoe is illustrated together with the usual leather heel section I2 to which the usual rubber heel is nailed or otherwise secured. To the heel section I2 is attached my cushioned heel I4.

The cushioned heel I4 comprises a rubber heel portion I 6 against the inner face of which is positioned a metallic plate I8 constituting a rest for the smaller ends of a series of cone springs f 20. The larger ends of the cone springs abut a metallic plate 22 secured to the heel portion I2 by screws 24. A plurality of openings 26 is provided in the metallic plate I8 for the reception of snubbers 28 formed integrally with the rubber heel portion I6, Ears 30 are struck from the plate 22 and bent around the first convolution in the cone springs 20 to hold the springs in relatively spaced positions on the plate 22 so as to maintain proper distribution of the springs.

A thin Wall 32 is formed integrally with the heel portion I 6, which wall is reinforced by fabric 34 secured to the inner face of the Wall. Thus the outer face of the wall is of the same material and appearance as the heel section I6. The upper edge of the wall 32 is formed to provide a tubular bead 36 through which a wire 38 is threaded. The bead lies adjacent the leather heel portion I2 and constitutes a securing means for the rubber heel portion.

A flange 40 is struck from the plate 22 and is curved to the contour of the bead 36, the latter being drawn tightly into the groove formed by the flange 40 and the leather heel portion I2 through tightening of the Wire 38. In Figures 2 and 3, the ends of the Wire 38 are respectively provided with rightand left-hand threads 42 and 44 for threaded connection with a turnbuckle 46 which is in the nature of a tube provided with internal threads. A transverse opening 48 is provided in the turnbuckle 46 for the reception of a pin to facilitate turning of the turnbuckle relatively to the threads 42 and 44. A portion of the bead 36 is cut away at 50 to provide accommodation for the turnbuckle 46 as Well as to lend accessibility tothe threads 42 and 44. This cutout is preferably located at the shank end of the heel, and the wall spanning the cutout is suiiiciently resilient to permit bending, as when the turnbuckle is being manipulated.

The perimeter of the rubber heel I6, particularly the outer face of the Wall 32, terminates flush with the sides and rear faces of the leather heel I2, thus giving the` cushioned heel the appearance of a conventional rubber heel. While the walls 32 are non-elastic, the Walls ex easily as to accommodate the cushioning action of the heel structure, as when the springs 20 compress and extend as an incident to load variation transmitted thereto when walking.

The snubbers 28 are engageable by the plate 22 upon predetermined compression of the springs 20, and the cone springs provide the necessary spring action within a confined space. Thus the vertical dimension of the cushioned heel may be limited to reasonable limits at the sains time embodying a necessary spring action. The rubber heel is effectively secured to the plate 22 through mere tightening of the Wire 38. The perimeter of the plate 22, including the flange 40, is such as to bring the outer face of the rubber heel into proper relationship with the outer face of the leather heel I2.

Without further elaboration, the foregoing will so fully illustrate my invention, that others may, by applying current knowledge, readily adaptl the same for use under various conditions of service.

I claim:

1. In combination with a shoe heel portion, a cushioned heel comprising a plate secured to said heel portion, said plate having a margin shaped to provide a space between the margin and said heel portion, a heel section having a ilexible wall provided with a bead lying in said space, means for drawing said bead into firm engagement with said margin and said heel portion,'

cone springs interposed between said plate and said heel section, said heel section and said wall comprising rubber, and fabric reinforcement secured to the inner face of said wall and leinbedded in said bead.

2. In combination with a shoe heel portion, a cushioned heel comprising a plate secured to said heel portion, said plate having a margin shaped to provide a space between the margin and said heel portion, a. heel section having a exible wall provided with a bead lying in said space, means for drawing said bead into rm engagement with said margin and said heel portion, cone springs interposed between said plate l l s i and said heel section, said heel section comprising rubber, a rigid plate interposed between said cone springs and said heel section, said rigid plate being provided with perforations, and snubber elements formed integrally with said heel section and extending through said perforations for engagement by said iirst plate upon a predetermined degree of compression of the cone springs.

3. In combination with a shoe heel portion, a cushioned heel comprising a plate secured to said heel portion, said plate having a margin shaped to provide a space between the margin and said heel portion, a heel section having a flexible wall provided with a bead lying in said space, means for drawing said bead into firm engagement with said margin and said heel portion, cone springs interposed between said plate and said heel section, said heel section comprising rubber, a rigid plate interposed between said cone springs and said heel section, said rigid plate being provided with perforations, snubber elements formed integrally with said heel section and extending through said perforations for engagement by said rst plate upon a predetermined degree of compression of the cone springs, said bead being of tubular formation, said means comprising a wire threaded through said bead and provided with rightand left-hand threads at its ends, and a turnbuckle threadedly engaging said threads for tightening the wire to draw said bead into position.

4. In combination with a shoe heel portion, a cushioned heel comprising a plate secured to said heel portion, said plate having a margin shaped to provide a space between the margin and said heel portion, a heel section having a flexible wall provided with a bead lying in said space, means for drawing said bead into firm engagement with said margin and said heel portion, cone springs interposed between said plate and said heel section, said heel section comprising rubber, a rigid plate interposed between said cone springs and said heel section, said rigid plate being provided with perforations, snubber elements formed integrally with said heel section and extending through said perforations for engagement by said rst plate upon a predetermined degree of compression of the cone springs, said bead being of tubular formation, said means comprising a wire threaded through said bead and provided with rightand left-hand threads at its ends, and a turnbuckle threadedly engaging said threads for tightening the wire to draw said bead into position, said bead having a cutout for accommodating the turnbuckle and the latter being located adjacent the' shank portion of the shoe.

5. In combination with a shoe heel portion, a resilient heel having a exible'wall detachably connected with said shoe heel portion, a perforated rigid plate engaging said heel section inside 'said flexible wall, compression springs interposed between Ysaid plate and said heel portion, and resilient snubber elements attached to said heel section and extending through the perorations in said rigid plate to engage said heel portion upon predetermined compression o said springs.

ALBERT J. DENK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2454951 *Jul 21, 1947Nov 30, 1948Smith Herbert HSpring heel for footwear
US2535102 *Nov 24, 1945Dec 26, 1950Walton Taylor JamesShoe heel
US2548308 *Jan 6, 1950Apr 10, 1951Hensley Charles WSpring heel construction
US4535553 *Sep 12, 1983Aug 20, 1985Nike, Inc.Shock absorbing sole layer
US4592153 *Jun 25, 1984Jun 3, 1986Jacinto Jose MariaHeel construction
US5343639 *Oct 18, 1993Sep 6, 1994Nike, Inc.Shoe with an improved midsole
US5353523 *Oct 13, 1993Oct 11, 1994Nike, Inc.Shoe with an improved midsole
US5435079 *Dec 20, 1993Jul 25, 1995Gallegos; Alvaro Z.Spring athletic shoe
US5513448 *Jul 1, 1994May 7, 1996Lyons; LevertAthletic shoe with compression indicators and replaceable spring cassette
US6487796Jan 2, 2001Dec 3, 2002Nike, Inc.Footwear with lateral stabilizing sole
US6880267Jan 28, 2004Apr 19, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US6898870Mar 20, 2002May 31, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole having support elements with compressible apertures
US6964120Nov 2, 2001Nov 15, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US6968636Apr 26, 2004Nov 29, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole with a stiffness adjustment mechanism
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US7395616 *Oct 14, 2005Jul 8, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a pivoting sole element
US7401418Aug 17, 2005Jul 22, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US7441347Jul 1, 2005Oct 28, 2008Levert Francis EShock resistant shoe
US7493708Feb 18, 2005Feb 24, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with plate dividing a support column
US7533477Oct 3, 2005May 19, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7748141May 18, 2006Jul 6, 2010Nike, IncArticle of footwear with support assemblies having elastomeric support columns
US7774955Apr 17, 2009Aug 17, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7810256Apr 17, 2009Oct 12, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7841105Dec 7, 2009Nov 30, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US8302234Apr 17, 2009Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8302328Jun 29, 2010Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8312643Sep 28, 2010Nov 20, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8656608Sep 13, 2012Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US9072337Oct 6, 2008Jul 7, 2015Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating an impact absorber and having an upper decoupled from its sole in a midfoot region
US20040128860 *Jan 8, 2003Jul 8, 2004Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US20040181969 *Jan 28, 2004Sep 23, 2004Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US20040221483 *Nov 2, 2001Nov 11, 2004Mark CartierFootwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US20050241184 *Jul 1, 2005Nov 3, 2005Levert Francis EShock resistant shoe
WO2003022087A1 *Sep 5, 2002Mar 20, 2003Thomas D LombardinoArticle of footwear incorporating a shock absorption and energy return assembly
WO2003056963A1 *Jan 3, 2003Jul 17, 2003David KrafsurShock resistant shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/36.00R, 36/38
International ClassificationA43B21/30, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/30
European ClassificationA43B21/30