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Publication numberUS2299450 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1942
Filing dateMar 13, 1940
Priority dateMar 13, 1940
Publication numberUS 2299450 A, US 2299450A, US-A-2299450, US2299450 A, US2299450A
InventorsAnderson Chester A
Original AssigneeAlfred Anderson, Raymond N Ornberg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressure oilcan
US 2299450 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

f Oct. 20, 1942.- c. A, ANDERSON PRES SURE OIL CAN Filed March i3, 1940 Patented Oct. 20, 1942 PRESSURE OILCAN Chester A. Anderson, Litchfield, Minn., assignor of one-third to Alfred Anderson and one-third to Raymond N. Ornberg, both of Litchfield,

Minn.

Application March 13, 1940, Serial No. 323,731

6 Claims.

This invention relates to hand oilers and more particularly to pressure oil cans of a type generally similar to that shown in my prior Patent No. 2,169,209, issued August 15, 1939. v

One of the objects of my invention is to provide a hand oiler wherein oil is dispensed from the can under pressure in such a manner that the can can be held with the spout pointing upwardly and due to the pressure on the oil it will be dispensed upwardly from the spout.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pressure oil can which is relatively simply constructed and wherein the parts are so related that they can be easily assembled with a minimum of labor.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pressure oil can construction wherein the dispensing mechanism can be applied to can mouths having internal or external threads and wherein the adaptation of the pressure unit to one form of can mouth or the other can be accomplished by the simple substitution of one small part for another.

A further object of the invention is to provide improved means for inserting and retaining the dispensing spout in position relative to the pressure mechanism.

Still another object of the invention is to provide improved plunger construction to assist in building up pressures to force oil outwardly through the spout.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will more fully appear from the following description made in connection with the accompanying drawing, wherein like reference characters refer to the same parts throughout the views, and, in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation partly in section and partly broken away showing an embodiment of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional View through the nger contacting flange associated with the pumping unit;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation partly in section of another embodiment of my invention; and

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary View of the upper portion of the plunger shown in Fig. 3.

In Fig. 1 there is shown a can body 5 of conventional structure. This body has an open mouth at its upper end dened by a threaded flange or neck portion 6. This flange has a rolled bead 'I at its edge.

Threadedly secured to the threaded can mouth iiange 6 is an apertured cap 8 whose downwardly extending threaded ange 9 lies externally of the can mouth flange 6. Lying beneath the cap 8 and between the cap and rolled edge 1 of the can mouth is a ring I which has a downwardly extending internally threaded flange or collar II as is clearly shown. Suitable packing l2 is provided between the ring I0 and the bead 'l on the can mouth. Threaded into the collar I I is the upper end of a cylinder I3 which extends downwardly from the can mouth into the interior of the body of the can 5. This cylinder has a plurality of apertures I4 formed in its side wall intermediate the ends of the cylinder, and above the apertures I4 is a second series of apertures I5 which are also formed in the cylinder Wall for a purpose to be described later.

Slidably mounted in the cylinder I3 and extending upwardly through the open upper end of the cylinder is a hollow plunger element I6 which in its upper portion is of materially less diameter than the inside diameter of the cylinder I3. The upper and intermediate portions of plunger I6 are adapted to pass through the apertured cap 8, and packing Il is provided to prevent leakage past the exterior of the plunger through the aperture in said cap. The lower end of the plunger is of greater diameter, as shown by the portion indicated generally at I8, and it is this enlarged lower plunger portion which slidably fits the interior of the cylinder IS. The upper end of plunger I6 is open with an internally extending iiange I9 defining the opening. Extending into the upper plunger opening is a plurality of spring metal tongues 20 which are formed on a radial finger contacting ange 2|. The ange 2| is se-K cured to the upper end of the plunger by pressingl the spring tongues 20 into the plunger opening;

unti1 small projections 22 on the spring tongues; snap past the flange I9 on the upper end of said' plunger. This finger contacting ange can be; removed from the plunger when desired, but it, is relatively rmly retained in position due to. the action of the tongues and the small projec-l tions 22.

Extending upwardly through the open upper end of plunger I6 is a spout 23 whose lower end is enlarged as shown to provide a shoulder which contacts the packing 24 and the lower ends of the spring tongues 20 to prevent the spout from being drawn entirely through the plunger in an upward direction. A compression spring 25 is mounted between the closed bottom of cylinder I3 and the inner shoulder formed at the lower end of the spout 23. This spring has suilicient strength to normally maintain the spout in position with respect to the plunger I6 and also to normally maintain the plunger in the upper position illustrated.

With the parts disassembled the cap 8 is first slipped over the smaller upper end of plunger I5 and the nger contacting ange 2I is connected to the plunger by pressing the spring tongues 2!) inwardly past the ange I9 on the plunger. The spout is then inserted by passing its small end upwardly through the plunger unti1 the enlarged lower end of the spout contacts the packing I9 and the prongs or tongues 20. The spring 25 is positioned with its upper end seatedin the en larged lower end of the spout 23 and the cylinder I3 is then slipped over the lower end of spring 25 and threadedly secured to the threaded portion II of the ring I0. This entire unit is then connected to the can body by threadedly engaging the cap 8 to the can mouth.

The cylinder I3 can be loaded with oil if the normal level in the can is below the cylinder inlet openings I3 by tilting or inverting the can for an instant. The can can then be returned to an upright position and as pressure is applied to the nger contacting ilange 2| the plunger I6 will move downwardly in the cylinder, and after the plunger has closed the cylinder openings I4 the enlarged lower end of the plunger will displace oil upwardly through the plunger and through the spout 23. Downward movement of the plunger I6 would tend to cause a partial Vacuum between the cap 8 and enlarged-lower plunger portion except for the provision of the openings I5 in the upper portion of the cylinder. In addition the openings I5 provide means for admitting oil at each stroke of the plunger to improve the seal between the sliding plunger and the wall of the cylinder I3.

In Fig. 3 there is shown a can body 26 which has an open mouth defined by an internally threaded portion 2l. A cap 28 has secured thereto on its under side a flanged ring 29 and the downwardly depending flange on said ring is threaded internally and externally. The externally threaded portion is adapted to screw into the internally threaded can mouth 21 and the internally threaded portion of the flange ring 29 is adapted to threadedly engage and support a cylinder I3a constructed in the same manner as cylinder I3 in Fig. 1. This cylinder is provided with oil inlet openings Illa and pressure relieving openings I5a. Slidably mounted in the cylinder I3a. is a plunger 30 whose lower end is constructed in the same manner as the enlarged lower end I8 on the plunger I6 in Fig. 1. The upper end of plunger 30, however, is constructed differently from that shown in the first described embodiment. Said upper end, as best shown in Fig. 4, has an inwardly extending shoulder 3I and rising upwardly from the shoulder is a plurality of arcuate spring tongues 32 which present convex surfaces on their outer sides. The spout 23a is adapted to be inserted upwardly through the plunger in the manner of the spoutv 23 and the enlarged lower end of said spout bears against a packing ring 33 which lies beneath the shoulder 3I formed on the plunger. A spring 25a normally urges the spout 23a upwardly with respect to the plunger 30 and also maintains said plunger in an upper position relative to the cylinder I3a. An apertured ilange 34 is slipped over the spout 23a and the opening in said flange is of such size that it can be forced down over the spring tongues 32 on the plunger with a snap action and will rest upon the outer portion of the shoulder 3| on said plunger.

It will be seen that'in the structure shown in Fig. 3 the general assembly procedure is the same as in the case of the embodiment first described, and when assembled the pumping action of the can is the same as in the rst embodiment.

It is possible to interchange the pumping or pressure unit in either form of the device with can mouths which have internal or external threads. To adapt the structure of Fig. 1 to an internally threaded can mouth it is necessary only to replace the apertured cap 8 with the apertured 8 can be incorporated with the pumping unit shown in Fig. 3 so that either internally or externally threaded can mouths can be utilized. The entire structure is relatively simple and the few moving parts are so related that there is substantially no possibility of the parts getting out of order, and due to the extreme ease of assembly the device can be produced at a relatively low cost. It will be seen that means is provided for properly 'sealing relatively movable parts to prevent leakage and the can can be easily manipulated with one hand to provide an extremely convenient pressure oiling device.

It will, of course, be understood that various changes may be made in the form, arrangements, details and proportions of the various parts without departing from the scope of my invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A pressure oil can comprising a can body having a mouth, a cylinder supported in said mouth, a plunger having an upper end and being sldable in said cylinder and having an aperture axially therethrough, a spout extending upwardly through said plunger and having an 'enlarged lower end, said plunger at its upper end including a flange extending upwardly around said spout, and an apertured finger engaging flange fitted around the upwardly extending flange 'on the end of said plunger. I

2. The structure in claim 1 and the upwardly extending flange at the upper end of saidplunger comprising a plurality of resilient elements yieldably gripping said nger engaging flange through the aperture in said last mentioned flange.

3. A pressure oil can comprising, a can body having a mouth, a cylinder supported in said mouth, a hollow plunger sldable in said cylinder and having an open upper end, a spout extending upwardly through the open upper end of said plunger, and spout retaining means comprising a resilient element engaging said spout and yieldably maintaining said spout in position relative to the open upper end of said plunger.

4. A pressure oil can comprising, a can body having a mouth, a cylinder supported Yin said mouth, a plunger sldable in said cylinder, means for normally urging said plunger upwardly in said cylinder, a finger engaging llange connected to said plunger to permit pressing of the flange and plunger downwardly relative to saidV cylinder, a spout extending upwardly through said plunger, and said linger engaging flange having a portion extending into said plunger between the upper end of said plunger and a lower portion of said spout.

5. The structure in claim 4 arid said finger engaging flange including a collar-like portion cap 28 shown in Fig. 3, and conversely the-cap 75 made up of a plurality of resilient elements extending into said plunger, said resilient Yelements being yieldably pressed radially outwardly to provide for detachable engagementV with said' plunger. v

6. A pressure oil can comprising, a can body having a mouth, a cylinder supported in said mouth, a plunger sldable in said cylinder, means for normally urging said plunger upwardly in said cylinder, a linger engaging flange associated with said plunger to permit pressing of the flange and plunger downwardly relative to said cylinder, a spout, and portions Vof said finger engaging flange, spout, and plunger lying in concentric relationship and in frictional engagement.

CHESTER A. .ANDIEIIEE'SOILv

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2504371 *Sep 27, 1946Apr 18, 1950Alfred AndersonHand-operated pressure oilcan
US2889964 *Mar 14, 1956Jun 9, 1959Drackett CoDispenser pump
US4944430 *Aug 7, 1987Jul 31, 1990Ing. Erich Pfeiffer Gmbh & Co. KgFluid dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/321.6, 222/321.4
International ClassificationF16N3/00, F16N3/08
Cooperative ClassificationF16N3/08
European ClassificationF16N3/08