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Publication numberUS2299668 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1942
Filing dateMay 24, 1939
Priority dateMay 24, 1939
Publication numberUS 2299668 A, US 2299668A, US-A-2299668, US2299668 A, US2299668A
InventorsWebster Robert A
Original AssigneeWebster Robert A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Discharge device for ash receptacles
US 2299668 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1942. WEBSTER I DISCHARGE DEVICE FOR ASH RECEPTACLES Filed May 24, 1939 III . I/IIII/IIII/II/ III/I. 'I/II/II/IIIIIIIIIIII/ Patented Oct. 20, 1942 U ITE STATES PATENT oriuca 2,299,668 DISCHARGE DEVICE FOR ASH BECEPTACLES Robert A. Webster, Santa Monica, Calif. Application May24, 1939, Serial No. 275,573

Claims,

This invention relates to a discharge device for the ash trays or receptacles of passenger vehicles, such as automobiles, airplanes, railway passenger cars and the like.

When riding in an automobile, railway passenger'car or like vehicle at high speed or over rough roads or tracks it is very difllcult to deposit the stub of a cigarette or a cigar in an ash tray due to the motion of the vehicle. This results in the tendency toward throwing burning tobacco out of a car, which is a cause of the starting 01' forest fires and sometimes the burning stub is blown back into the car, resulting in burned upholstery, clothing or blankets. Furthermore, such ash trays are difilcult to clean and where there is an accumulation of stubs the whole mass often catches fire when a burning stub is added which was not extinguished before deposit into the ash tray. The dropping of burning tobacco on the inside 01' aircraft is also a cause of fire danger.

The present invention is especially designed to furnish a means to effect discharge of all waste material deposited in the receptacles so as to keep the interior of the vehicle as far as possible clear of particles of such material and to consume the discharging particles thereof, so as to prevent fire hazards both interiorly and exteriorly of the vehicle. The waste matter deposited in the receptacles may from the receptacles to a catch basket or incinerator in which the waste matter is burned, or it may be discharged by compressed air or by pressure of exhaust gases from th vehicle engine or by suction induced by such gases or by special means. In the present instance I have shown the use of novel and special suction means to facilitate the discharge of the waste material from the receivers to a catch basket or incinerator, although it is understood that my invention, in its broad aspects, is not necessarily confined to any of these methods of discharge. I

One object of my invention is to provide a simple, reliable and efficient typ and construction of discharge means for the ash trays in such vehicles whereby the material deposited in the tray or trays will be rapidly discharged and the tray or trays kept clean and fire hazard eliminated.

Another object of the invention is to provide a suction discharge means which may be applied to a vehicle for use in connection with conventional or special ash trays in a ready and inexpensive manner.

Still another object of the invention is to prob discharged by gravity vide a discharge device which embodies an incinerator of novel type in which all burning or unconsumed particles will be fully consumed before discharge.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of the features of construction, combination and arrangement of parts, hereinafter fully described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawing, in whic Fig. Us a vertical longitudinal section through a portion of an automobile showing an exemplifled application of a suction type of device embodying my invention thereto.

Fig. 2 is a cross-section on line 22 of Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is a sectional plan view of parts of the discharge device on an enlarged scale.

Fig. 4 is a detail view of one of the trays and coacting suction discharge tube, showing a feature of construction.

Fig. 5 is a view exempliilcatively illustrating the application or the invention to an airplane.

Fig. 6 is a view showing a modification.

Fig. 7 is a view showing another modification.

Referring now more particularly to Figs. 1 to 4, inclusive, of the drawing, i designates a part of the body of an automobile to which my invention, for purposes of exemplification, is shown in the present instance applied. The body I shown is 01 a well known closed type, having a front seat 2 and a rear seat 3. This type "or body is also one having arm rests 4 at its sides for the convenience of passengers occupying the rear seat. Supported by these arm rests or supported on the side walls of the vehicle adjacent thereto are ash receivers 5, each having or not a pivoted top closure or cover 6. The discharge means embodying my invention is herein shown as applied for use in connection with ash receivers 5 so disposed, although it is understood that the discharge means may be used in connection with ash receivers varying in number and arrangement in the vehicle body and mounted in any type of vehicle body. The receivers 5 may be of any suitable form and provided or not with covers.

Leading from the receivers 5 at the right and left hand sides of the the floor 1 of the body are discharge tubes or conduits 8. Each tube or conduit may be and preferably is of like diameter throughout except that it may be provided with a constricte portion 9 at or in close proximity to its point of connection with the receiver to prevent any material sufiicient in quantity to clog the tube from being body downward through forced into or becoming jammed in the tube and interfering with its function.

Beneath the floor I the tubes or conduits 8 lead to a common collector or catch receptacle Ill arranged within the forward constricted circular portion ll of a Venturi tube l2 having a rear flaring or funnel-shaped portion [3. This collector may be of circular, rectangular or other suitable form and is made of perforate sheet material, wire mesh fabric, or other durable fireproof material suitably perforated for the purpose. The function of this receptacle I is to arrest the motion of and to hold from discharge all burning and not fully consumed particles of material until the same are fully consumed and reduced to an incombustible state for discharge in the form of ashes. The receptacle H), in other words, acts as an incinerator, in which all unconsumed particles, in the presence of a spark or sparks therein, are caused to burst into flame and to be rendered harmless so far as causing a fire is concerned before they are discharged from the discharge device. Air to support combustion during this action is supplied through open receivers and the suction tubes 9 and/ or through a restricted air inlet M at the forward end of the Venturi tube. The opening I4, if used, is made of a suitably restricted size to allow air to enter the receptacle in such reduced volume and at such reduced velocity as to prevent forcible discharge of unconsumed particles before they are consumed and reduced to an ash state. The opening l4 may be omitted in the event that always-open receivers 5, i. e., receivers without closure tops, are used, but such opening is preferably used in case the receivers are provided with closure tops in order to ensure a supply of air to the incinerator in the event of the cut off of air supply through the suction tubes. The walls of the perforations or mesh interstices in the incinerator body act as detainers to assist in holding the particles while they are being consumed and to keep them separated or spread so that the streams of air passing through perforations of suitable form, number and size in the incinerator body will flow throughout the mass of particles, if collected in a mass, to ensure their rapid and complete combustion. Preferably also, the incinerator body is provided with screen disk (perforate or foraminous) front and rear Walls 15 and i6 acting as bafiies to control the velocity of the air and to check and prevent the discharge of the burning particles until completely consumed and reduced to the state of ashes.

The Venturi tube may be of any suitable shape and size to give the desired suction draw or force in the forward travel of the vehicle. The actual shape and size of the Venturi device employed, in other words, may be any determined by actual experiment to be best for a particular installation. This Venturi or suction producing or inducing device may be so arranged as to discharge the ashes at the rear of the car or downward out of the way of any inflammable products on the vehicle. If desired, and as shown in Fig. 6, by disposing front and rear screen partition disks 15a and Mia in the portion H of the Venturi tube such portion of the Venturi tube may be employed to serve as the body wall of an incinerator chamber Illa. Also, if desired, there may be employed, in place of the Venturi tube, under some conditions, a suction and discharge fan H, as shown in Fig. '7, driven by a small electric motor I8 operated by current from the storage battery of the vehicle. This fan may be connected at some suitable point with the suction conduit or conduits to draw the waste material from one or more ash receivers into the fan chamber and then discharge the particles therefrom. The blades of this fan when the fan is so used may be formed to act as particle retainers and to turn the same over and over while they are being consumed and then discharge the resulting ashes. The fan may thus be caused to perform an incinerating action similar to that of the incinerator ill or Ilia.

There may desirably be used under some conditions in connection wtih the suction devic and incinerator a guard and deflector I9 disposed beneath and if desired suitably about the sides of the same to protect such parts from damage by rocks or other foreign objects which might otherwise be thrown against the same in the travel of the car.

If desired, a connection from the exhaust pipe 20 of the vehicle engine may lead to the incinerator so that discharging hot combustion gases from the engine may be supplied thereto to facilitate the burning of the waste material.

It will, of course, be understood that any suitable means other than the means shown fcr producing a partial vacuum or otherwise inducing or causing a flow of air in the discharge conduit for effecting a discharge action may be employed. It will also be understood that in practice there may be provided a discharge conduit, an incinerator and a suction producing means for each individual receiver, or that any number of receivers may be operatively connected through conduits with a. single incinerator and coacting suction producing means.

In Fig. 5 I have shown the application of the invention to an airplane in which ash receivers 5' arranged in proximity to seats 2| in the airplane body I! are connected by suction conduits 23 to an incinerator and suction producing device H l2 of the constructions previous y described, and in conjunction with which are also used a guard l5 and exhaust pipe connection l6 for the purposes described. The arrangement as shown is such as to allow occupants of the plane to dispose of lighted cigar or cigarette stubs without liability of fire hazard on the inside of the craft and so that such dangerous refuse may be consumed and discharged on the exterior of the craft in the form of dead ashes. The guard 9' here serves as a fender to prevent possible damage to the suction producing device and incinerator while landing the airplane on the ground.

The use of my discharge device in connection with the ash receivers on vehicles of the character described will be readily understood and appreciated. As all deposited ashes will be discharged by gravity or drawn down into the discharge conduits the spilling or blowing of ashes about the interior of the car will be prevented. The device will also be self-clearing and selfcleaning, as due to the flow of air and motion of the car and provision of the incinerator complete combustion of all unconsumed particles and discharge of. all deposits will be ensured. By this means objectionable odors will also be eliminated because there will be at no time any collection of stale tobacco or deposits in the receptacles and the flowing air will carry off all odors with the deposits. Furthermore, as all deposited burning or unconsumed particles will be removed from the interior of the car and consumed and discharged in the form of dead ashes,

all fire hazards will be eliminated, both on the interior and exterior of the car.

From the foregoing description, taken in connection with the drawing, the construction, operation and advantages of my invention will be understoodwithout a further and extended description. While the constructions shown for purposes of exempliflcation are preferred, it will, of course, be understood that changes in the form, construction other than those indicated, may be made within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention. As stated, while the use of suction discharge means of the character disclosed is preferred, the waste matter may be discharged by gravity, or by fluid pressure or by any other type of suction means.

What I claim is:

1. A device of the character described comprising a refuse receiver, a suction conduit leading from the receiver, and a combined suction producing device and incinerator connected with the conduit and embodying a chamber having an air inlet at one end in open communication with the atmosphere, a flaring suction producing element at its opposite end, and perforate baiiies in said chamber formed of diaphragm walls having small openings throughout their areas, said baflles operating to retain within and prevent the discharge from said chamber of unconsumed particles of refuse material until the particles are consumed while allowing free flow of air therethrough to support combustion of the particles and free discharge of the ashes of combustion.

2. A device of the character described comprising a refuse receiver, a suction conduit leading from the receiver, a combined suction producing receptacle andincinerator in said conduit having a restricted air inlet opening at its forward end and suction producing means at its rear end and also having perforate baflles therein formed of diaphragm walls having small openings throughout their areas, said baflles operating to retain within and prevent the discharge from said chamber of unconsumed combustible particles of refuse until the particles are conand arrangement of parts,

sumed while allowing free flow of air and gases therethrough and discharge of the combustion ashes, and a, conductor connected to the receptacle for leading hot exhaust gases thereto.

3. A device of the character described comprising a refuse receiver, a suction tube leading therefrom, an incinerator chamber in said tube provided at one end with a restricted air inlet in open communication with the atmosphere, a suction producing element at the opposite end of the incinerator chamber, and perforate baflle diaphragm walls of screen mesh material in the chamber operating to retain within and prevent the discharge from said chamber of unconsumed combustible particles of refuse until the particles are consumed while allowing free flow of air therethrough and discharge of the combustion ashes therefrom.

4. A device of the character described comprising a refuse receiver, a suction tube leading therefrom, an incinerator chamber in said tube provided at one end with a restricted airinlet in open communication with the atmosphere, a Venturi tube suction producer at the opposite end of the incinerator chamber, and perforate baflies in said chamber formed of diaphragm walls having small openings throughout their areas, said baflies operating to retain within and prevent the discharge from said chamber of combustible refuse particles until the particles are consumed while allowing free flow of air therethrough and discharge of the combustion ashes therefrom. I

5. A device of the character described comprising a refuse receiver, a suction conduit leading therefrom, and a combined suction producing device and incinerator in said conduit consisting of a chamber provided with means carried thereby for producing a suction therein, and perforate baflies in the chamber formed of diaphragm walls having small openings throughout their areas, said baffles operating to retain with in and prevent the discharge from said chamber of unconsumed combustible refuse particles until the particles are consumed while allowing free flow of air therethrough to support combustion of the particles.

ROBERT A. WEBSTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2459459 *Jul 1, 1946Jan 18, 1949Seaman Elliston PSelf-emptying ash tray for automobiles
US2461815 *Mar 28, 1947Feb 15, 1949Gill Robert LVehicle ash receiver with suction discharge
US2499803 *Nov 30, 1945Mar 7, 1950Von Benkendorff Emilie RyanAsh dispenser
US2541929 *Dec 18, 1947Feb 13, 1951Marley William CCigarette extinguishing ash tray
US2556370 *Jan 6, 1950Jun 12, 1951Holmes Henry WAsh receptacle for automotive vehicles
US2561275 *Apr 26, 1948Jul 17, 1951Hentschel William EAsh collector with shredding means
US2637490 *Jul 18, 1949May 5, 1953Harris Louise ECigarette chute
US2663504 *Aug 13, 1951Dec 22, 1953Hooker Jr Charles LDisposal device for cigars, cigarettes, and like waste materials
US2680569 *Apr 15, 1952Jun 8, 1954Leslie Paul NicholasSuction disposal attachment for ash receptacles
US2725587 *Dec 2, 1952Dec 6, 1955Coles James FVacuum cleaner for motor vehicles
US2737131 *Aug 13, 1952Mar 6, 1956Grant Casper EIncinerating device for cigarette and cigar butts
US2764281 *Oct 26, 1954Sep 25, 1956Mendenhall Henry LAutomobile ash tray having exhaust actuated evacuating structure
US2800864 *Sep 15, 1954Jul 30, 1957Ward David RDisposal unit for burning items
US2851156 *Apr 26, 1955Sep 9, 1958Thompson Emmett CSuction ash tray
US3250382 *May 25, 1964May 10, 1966Beil John RTrash collector
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US3384916 *May 25, 1966May 28, 1968Russell HockinAutomobile vacuum cleaning system
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US4391017 *Dec 28, 1981Jul 5, 1983Lockheed CorporationDevice for removing incendiary matter from the interior of an aircraft
US4453286 *Apr 21, 1983Jun 12, 1984Wieland Clarence WVacuum induced trash collection system
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US4936321 *Aug 2, 1989Jun 26, 1990Bludis Thomas TVehicle ash receiver with ash discharging device
US5312072 *Aug 9, 1990May 17, 1994The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of TransportationMinimum area smoke evacuation nozzle
US5542438 *Apr 21, 1994Aug 6, 1996Progressive Games, Inc.Smokeless ashtray system
US5944024 *Mar 8, 1996Aug 31, 1999Progressive Games, Inc.Vacuum filtration system especially adapted for removing smoke in the vicinity of ashtrays
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US20120210536 *Nov 2, 2011Aug 23, 2012Shay JanVehicular vacuum cleaning system
WO1996033884A1 *Apr 17, 1996Oct 31, 1996British American Tobacco CoAir treatment in passenger vehicles
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Classifications
U.S. Classification296/37.11, 126/19.5, 280/727, 131/231, 15/313
International ClassificationB64D11/00, B61D35/00, B60N3/08
Cooperative ClassificationB64D2013/0692, B60N3/086, B61D35/00, B64D11/00
European ClassificationB64D11/00, B61D35/00, B60N3/08B2