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Publication numberUS2301427 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 10, 1942
Filing dateAug 26, 1940
Priority dateAug 26, 1940
Publication numberUS 2301427 A, US 2301427A, US-A-2301427, US2301427 A, US2301427A
InventorsLyon Jr John K
Original AssigneeLyon Jr John K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bubble-forming device
US 2301427 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NV 10, 1942- J. K. LYON, JR

BUBBLE-FORMING DEVICE 3 Sheets-'Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 26. 1940 Nov. l0, l942. J, K. LYON, JR A 2,3,427

BUBBLE-FORMING DEVICE Filed Aug. 26,1940 s sheets-sheet 2 Y I JOHN LYQMJR.

IN VEN TOR.

A TTORNEY.

Nov. l0, 1942. J, K, LYoN, JR 2,301,427

" yBUBBLE-FORMING DEVICE Filed Aug. 26. 1940 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 JOHN K. LYON, JR.

. INVENTOR.

A TTORNEY.

Patented Nov. 10, 1942 UNITED STATES FATENT OFFICE 6 Claims.

This invention relates to game devices and pertains particularly to a device adapted for successive production of bubbles and the discharge of such bubbles upwardly into the air in position to be shot at in a manner comparable to the release of birds in trap or skeet shooting.

One of the particular objects of the invention is to provide a complete game device packaged in a box-like structure, the integral parts of which are adapted to serve as a support for the elements of the game device when in use.

A= further object of the invention is to provide a game device which is small and compact when packaged for carrying, and which may be assembled With a minimum of effort into a complete game structure adapted to form and release into the air relatively large bubbles at the will of the operator, in position to be shot at by the player.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel form of bubble-producing cup with which a plurality of sucessive bubbles may be produced,

the bubble cup being adapted to receive a given quantity of bubble-forming solution (such as a soap solution) Vfor the formation of each bubble, whereby the .bubbles produced by the cup are substantially identical as to size.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved form of valve device which is used alternatively and successively for the supply of air to such a bubble cup in the production of a given bubble and for the discharge of a blast of air to a position adjacent the cup to cause a dislodgement of the bubble from the cup `and the forcing of such bubble upwardly into the atmosphere.

The bubble target game device of this invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, together with detail views of the essential portions thereof, and referring thereto:

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of the device in assembled condition, ready for use, using the automatic valve device for successive supply of air to the bubble cup for the formation of a bubble and supply of air to the exterior of the bubble cup for dislodgment of the bubble into playing position; I

Fig. 2 is a sectional detail taken along line 2-2 in Fig. 1, illustrating the mode of assembling the apparatus;

Fig. 3 is a View corresponding to Fig. 1, illustrating the device as assembled for use Without the automatic valve device, in which separate air supply ducts are provided for the supply of air to the exterior of the bubble cup for dislodgment of the bubble;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of a portion of a box structure which, when the device is fully assembled, is employed as a support member;

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional detail of the improved form of bubble cup of the present invention; and

Fig. 6 is a partly broken-away detail view of the automatic valve device referred to in connection with the description of Fig. 1, providing for the alternative and successive supply of air to the bubble-forming cup for the purpose of producing a bubble and to the exterior of such cup for the purpose of dislodging a formed bubble.

Referring to Figs. 1-4 of the drawings, the assembled device is shown as comprising a base member I, a vertically extending support member 2, a diagonal knee brace I0 provided with a shelf portion 28, a bubble forming member 4i) disposed above the shelf portion 2B, a container 42 for supply of bubble forming liquid to the member 4i), and associated air supply means such as the conduit 44.

Inasmuch as the structure is desirably formed so as to fold into a compact package, the base member I may be formed as a box lid, the vertical support member 2 may be formed as a box bottom, and the diagonal knee brace, the member and container 42 may be so proportioned as to fit within the box portions when dismantled. In assembling the device, the box lid is inverted and the nat surface 3 thereof is set upon a suitable supporting surface and becomes the base member I; the box bottom is placed with its flat surface 4 extending vertically from within the base member i and against one of the end walls 5 of the base member. To rmly anchor the base and support members in this rel-ation, one end of the flat surface 4 of the member 2 is provided with spaced longitudinally extending parallel slits 6 and 'I at positions intermediate its width to provide a tab 8 (see Fig. 2) which is adapted to engage the outside of the end wall 5 of the base member I.

The brace member I0 is adapted to support a portion of the bubble game apparatus and to connect the horizontal base member I and vertical support member 2 as a knee brace. The member IB is shown in plan as a flat cardboard blank in Fig. 4 and in assembled relation in Figs. 1 and 3.

Referring particularly to Fig. 4, the member lil is shown as a generally rectangular member provided with tabs II and I2 at its ends which are adapted to be bent upwardly from the plane of to the bubble cup for formation of the bubble and the blank along dashed score lines indicated at I3 and I4 and extend through slots l5 and I6 provided in the members 4 and 3 respectively. The blank is further scored as at H and I8 at positions parallel to and spaced from its side edges to form tabs l and 26 which are raised to positions perpendicular to the face of the blank as shown in Fig. l to strengthen the bracing member.

The blank is further provided with an opening 2l located relatively near one end and one side, such as near the tab 20, and is adapted to receive and support a portion of the air supply apparatus, as will be described more fully hereinafter. A relatively larger opening 22 is provided substantially in the center of the blank i3 and is adapted to receive a receptacle such as a paper cup 23 to catch the excess bubble-forming liquid which drains from the apparatus during use.

The blank is either out or materiallyweakened along a line 24 to provide a longitudinally extending tongue 25 containing the opening 22, which is adapted to be bent upwardly from the face of the blank along Vthe dash line 26 and thence back on itself along the dash line 2'! to provide a shelf portion 28 (containing the opening 22) and a depending brace portion 29.

The lower end of the brace portion 23 may be provided with laterally extending wings 3l and 32 which are adapted for insertion through slits 33 and 34 provided in the blank to secure theV parts of the member l in the relation indicated in Fig. 1. The slits 33 and 34 preferably extend outwardly for a shorter distance than the wings 3| and 32, and these wings are provided with notches 35 and 36, whereby the outer portions of the wings are adapted to engage the base of the blank when the remaining portions of the wings are Vinserted through the slits 33 and 34. Y The bubble-forming'pipe 40 is shown supported by a bubble-forming liquid supply conduit 4l which is secured to a liquid supply container 42 which is vadapted to t on the upper end wall 43 of the support member 2. An air supply conduit 44, for example a flexible tube of rubber or other suitable material provides communication between the bubble-forming pipe and operating valve means 41.

The air supply conduit 44, at a position intermediate its ends, is shown extending through spaced parallel slits 45u and 45h provided in side wall 46 of the support member 2. The conduit is thus supported by interaction between a strap 45e raised between the slits and the portions of the wall 46 outwardly of the slits.

Referring to Fig. 6, the valve means 41 is shown as comprising a generally cylindrical vertically extending body member 48 provided with a vertically extending cylindrical bore 49 ccnnecting with an axially aligned lower bore 55 of somewhat lessdiameter. The lower end of the bore '50 is closed by a bottom wall 5| preferably provided with a small breather opening 5|a. An air inlet conduit 52 communicates with the bore 50 and is adapted for connection to an .air supply as through the agency of a flexible tube 53 whichmay be blown into by a player. Air outlet conduits 54 and 55 are shown conimunicating with the bore 49 at longitudinally spaced positions, the conduit 54 being connected to the air supply conduit 44 for supplying air to the bubble pipe and being located below the conduit 55. The air outlet conduit 55 is provided with a nozzle member 56 in the form of a short length of exible tubing and is directed toward the dot-dash arrow 66a.

the lower end of the bubble cup for the purpose of dislodging bubbles from the cup.

The valve means is shown located beneath the brace member l0 and adjacent the Wall 4. The flexible conduits 44 and 53 may extend through openings 51 and 58 in the wall 45 and support the valve means. The nozzle 56 may extend through the opening 2| in the brace member I6 in which position it cooperates with the conduits 44 and 53 to hold the valve means securely in position.

The valve means 4'! is provided with pressure responsive means which is shown as comprising a piston 6| adapted for longitudinal movement in the bore 45. The piston comprises an upper head portion 62 sealing the bore 49 and a lower skirt portion 63 provided with ports 64 located below the head 62. The piston 6l is movable in response to change in air pressure in the bore 49 below the head 62, between a first position in which the ports 64 are aligned with the conduit 54 and the piston head 62 closes the bore 49 between the conduits 54 and 55 and a second position in which the ports 64 are aligned with the conduit 55 and the skirt 63 covers the opening into the conduit 54. The piston 6| is suitably biased toward its iirst position as by gravity and is adapted to rest in this position upon a shoulder 65 formed at the juncture of the bores 49 and' 55.

Assuming that the apparatus has been assembled as described above and that the container 52 has been charged with a quantity of bubbleforming solution such as a soap solution, the apparatus is ready for use. The general theory of operation of the device in connection with forming the bubble and discharging it from the bubble forming member is comparable to that described in my copending application Serial No. 830,108, filed April 17, 1940. The bubble is formed by a relatively small amount of air at low pressure and is discharged from the bubble-forming member by a relatively large jet of air directed upwardly about the bubble-forming cup. The air for both of these operations is supplied through the conduit '53. During the period in which the bubble is formed the pressure is insuiiicient to raise the piston 6l materially. As a consequence air flows upwardly through the bore 50 and the skirt B3 and out through the ports 64 into the conduit 54 to the bubble cup 50, as indicated by the arrow 66.

After a formed bubble has reached a suicient diameter it may be discharged from the bubble cup 46 by increasing the airl pressure in bore 49 as by blowing harder into the conduit 53. This increase in pressure raises the piston 6I to its second position, as shown in dot-dash lines at 61a, where the skirt 63 closes the conduit 54 and prevents supply of air to the interior of the bubble, and where the ports 64 open into the conduit 55 and allow air to pass from the conduit 53 through the skirt 63 and out through the ports 64 into the conduit 55, as shown by This air issuing from the nozzle 56 is directed upwardly around the outside of the bubble cup and dislodges the bubble therefrom.

By making the conduit 55 and nozzle 56 sufficiently large as compared to the air inlet oondut y53, the upward motion of the piston will stop when the ports 64 are alined with the conduit 55. Obviously, a suitable stop may be provided for arresting the upward movement of the piston if desired. Upon lowering of the pressure in the bore 49 below the piston head, the piston returns to its first position. y

Referring particularly to Fig. 5, the improved bubble-forming member 4l) according to my invention is shown as comprising a body portion provided with a preferably slightly concave upper surface ll at which a bubble is formed during use, an air exhaust passage 'l2 communicating with the upper surface 'H as at 12a and extending interiorly of the body portion, an air inlet passage 13 extending from the exterior of the body portion 10 into communication with the passage 72, a liquid inlet passage 14 extending from the exterior of the body portion into communication with the passage 12 at a position between the point 72o', and the juncture of the passages 12 and 'i3 which is adapted to receive the conduit 4I (Fig. 1) A venting passage 15 is further provided which preferably extends from the lower edge of the passage 'i3 at the juncture thereof with the passage l2 to a position at the exterior of the body portion ld, and preferably in a generally downward direction.

The supply of liquid to the bubble-forming member is secured by gravity flow from the container 42 through the conduit 4l. The air inlet passage 'i3 is connected to the air supply conduit lid as by providing an enlarged bore 'i6 at the outer end there-of adapted to receive a nipple 'l1 to which the conduit 44 may be attached.

If no air is being forced through the conduit 44 and into the passage 'i3 the bubble-forming liquid will drain downwardly into the space below the juncture of the conduits 'l2 and 'I4, and any air entrapped thereby will be forced into the nipple ll or downwardly through the venting passage l. This venting passage is made suiciently large that the liquid will flow through the same and drip from the bottom of the body portion 'I0 into the cup 23 until an operating pressure is applied in the conduit 44, while maintaining the space below the juncture of the conduits 'I2 and i4 substantially filled with liquid and without unduly iooding this liquid into the nipple TI. A portion of the liquid may extend upwardly into the bore T2, dependent upon the relative sizes of the passages and the hydrostatic head from the supply of liquid in the container d2.

Application of operating pressure to the conduit 44 as above described will force the accumulated liquid from the aforesaid space upwardly through the passage 'i2 and a bubble will be formed at the point '12a when the air column reaches the upper surface of the body member. The sizes of the respective passages and the size of the aforesaid space is so adjusted as to supply the correct quantity of bubble-forming liquid for the production of a given size bubble, and the aforesaid space constitutes, in eiect, a reservoir for such given quantity of bubble-forming liquid. y

The supply of air to the bubble-forming member will also result in any residual liquid being biown downwardly through the passage 15, and a small bubble may be formed at this position; this bubble subsequently breaks and the accumulated liquid falls into the cup 23. Upon interruption of the supply of air into the conduit 44,

as when a formed bubble is dislodged from the upper surface of the bubble forming member, a new supply of bubble forming liquid will descend through the conduit 4I and passage 14 to the aforesaid space, charging the same for the production of a new bubble.

' It should be appreciated that to a certain ex' tent the advantages of my invention may be realize-d without the use of a valve member such as the member 4l. In Fig. 3 I have illustrated a form of my invention in which no valve member is used. In this gure the supporting structure is shown as comprising vertical and horizontal members and 8l formed from the bottom and top of a box like the members l and 2 and joined as shown inFigs. 1 and 2. A bracing member 83 is also provided for bracing the members 80 and 8l and for holding a drainage receiving cup 3d. rIhe bracing member 83 `may be formed in the same way as the member IU Vshown in Figs. 1 and 4.

The apparatus further comprises a vbubbleforming member 85 located above the cup 84 and supported on the supporting structure in the same way as the member 40in Fig. 1. An air supply conduit adapted for'connection to a supply of air under pressure leads from the member 85 and is supported on the supporting structure at 87 in the same manner as the conduit 44 of Fig. 1.

A second air supply conduit 8B is shown passing through an opening 89 in the side wall of the member 80 and thence through an ,opening 90 in the member 83 to provide a discharge opening 9i to direct air upwardly around the outside of the member 85. The opening 90 is comparable to the opening 2| of Fig. 1 and the discharge opening 9| corresponds in function to the nozzle 56 of Fig. 1.

This form of the apparatus may be operated by rst blowing into the conduit 86 to form the bubble and then blowing into the conduit 83 to dislodge the bubble.

It will be appreciated that wherever the word air is used throughout the specification and claims, any suitable gaseous fluid is contemplated. For example a suitable supply of oxygen or acetylene un-der pressure may be used.

Other modifications of the construction will occur to those skilled in the art and I do not choose to be limited to the specific embodiments herein delineated, but rather to the scope of the subjoined claims.

`I claim: l. In a bubble target game apparatus, the combination which comprises: a bubble-forming member; a rst conduit for supplying air to said bubble-forming member; a second conduit for directing a stream of air upwardly around the outside of said bubble-forming member; a third conduit for supplying air to said rst and second conduits; and valve means connecting said third conduit to said first and second conduits, said valve means comprising a member movable in response to an increase in yair pressure in said third conduit from a rst position admitting a flow of air from said third conduit to said first conduit while preventing a fiow of air from said third conduit to said second conduit, to a second position admitting the flow of air from said third conduit to said second conduit.

2. In a buh-ble target game apparatus, the combination which comprises: means defining a vertically extending cylindrical chamber; a rst conduit communicating with said chamber; a second conduit communicating with said chamber at a position above said rst conduit; a third conduit communicating with said chamber at a position above' said second conduit; and piston means slidably mounted in said chamber and biased downwardly, said piston means being adapted to rest in a lower position closing said third conduit to prevent passage of air from said rst to said third conduit and opening said second conduit to permit passage of air from said first to said second conduit under supply of air from said rst conduit at one value of air pressure, and movable upwardly to a raised position in response to an increase in air pressure over said one value to open said third conduitV and permit passage of air from said first to said third conduit.

3. An apparatus as set forth in claim 2, said piston means comprising an imperforate head portion and a skirt portion provided with a port communicating with the chamber below said piston means, said port communicating with said second conduit when said piston means is in its lower position and communicating with said third conduit when said piston means is in its raised position.

4. In a bubble target game apparatus, a bubbleforming member comprising: a body member having an upper surface, said body member having a plurality of passages therein, one of said passages extending downwardly from said upper surface and communicating with a second passage of smaller diameter extending downwardly through said body member and opening at the lower end thereof, a third one of said passages communicating with said first passage at a position above said second passage, and a fourth one of said passages communicating with said second passage at a position below said third passage.

5. In a bubble target game apparatus, a bubbleforming member comprising: a body member having an upper surface, said body member having an exhaust passage extending downwardly from the central portion of said upper surface, a liquid supply passage communicating with said first passage for supplying bubble-forming liquid to said member, a venting passage of less .diameter than said first passage and extending upwardly from the lower end of said body member to meet said first passage to form a venting opening in said member, and a fourth passage communieating with said first and third passages at a position below said second passage for supplying air to said member.

5. In a bubble target game apparatus, a combination which comprises: a bubble-forming member having an upper surface, said bubble forming member being provided with wall portions dening a plurality of passages therein, one of said passages extending downwardly from said upper surface to a position interiorly of said member, another of said passages extending transversely with respect to said first passage and dening a liquid inlet passage communicating with said iirst named passage, another of said passages adapted for communication with a source of air under pressure and extending interiorly of said member into communication with said rst named passage at a position below the position of communication of said first and second named passages, and a fourth passage communieating with said last named passage at the lower portion thereof to .denne a venting passage, said first, second and third named passages serving to define a liquid receptacle at the lower end of said first named passage.

JOHN K. LYON, Ja.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2611996 *Aug 13, 1949Sep 30, 1952Frank GarelickSpouting toy whale
US6062935 *Jun 29, 1998May 16, 2000Gross; StanleyBubble generator
US8745905 *Jul 1, 2012Jun 10, 2014Brady BandowGreeting card having integrated bubble feature
US20130000163 *Jul 1, 2012Jan 3, 2013Brady BandowGreeting card having integrated bubble feature
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/15, 40/408, 273/362
International ClassificationA63H33/28
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/28
European ClassificationA63H33/28