Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2304322 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1942
Filing dateJul 1, 1941
Priority dateAug 28, 1940
Publication numberUS 2304322 A, US 2304322A, US-A-2304322, US2304322 A, US2304322A
InventorsWerlich Reginald M
Original AssigneeWerlich Reginald M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hockey stick
US 2304322 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec.'8, 1942. R. M. WERLl CH 2,304,322

HOCKEY STICK Filed July 1, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 j/YVEWTOK- 1 R )1. Want/,4

, I97'TORNEX Dec: 8, 1942. R. M. WERLICH 2 22 HOCKEY STICK Filed July 1, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fi f'lf fie. 7

Patented Dec. 8, 1942 Reginald M. Werlich, Preston, Ontario, Canada Application July 1, 1941, Serial No. 400,643 In Canada August 28, 1940 3 Claims.

My invention relates to hockey sticks.

As; is well known, the usual one-piece hockey stick, that is, the hockey stick made from a solid piece of wood planed down or reduced to the required shape, is wasteful in manufacture. An appreciable percentage of the stock is wasted in reducing the same to the required shape of the stick. Accordingly, the tendency now is to manufacture composite hockey sticks, that is, sticks made of or assembled from separate pieces of wood. Various sticks have been proposed, most, if not all, of which are not satisfactory; in fact, I do not know of an entirely satisfactory composite stick, all of them having decided disadvantages.

The objects of the present invention, therefore, are to provide a satisfactory composite hockey stick, one which will be light but strong, and will provide strength where required, while being capable of easy and economical manufacture.

In the drawings, wherein like numerals of reference indicate corresponding parts in the various figures,

Figure l is a fragmentary side elevation of a hockey stick made in accordance with my invention;

Figure 2 is a section, on an enlarged scale, taken on line 2-2 in Figure 1;

Figures 3 to 7 are views similar to Figure 1, but showing different modifications, the flakes being omitted for the sake of clarity;

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 1, but showing still another modification;

Figure 9 shows the application of the invention to a goalkeepers stick.

The invention consists essentially in providing a handle member so formed at the lower end as to present two spaced or relatively diverging portions, one of which extends downwardly, and the other forwardly, and securing an insert to and between these portions. These portions and insert form the blade of the stick. The downwardlyextending portion forms the heel of the blade, while the forwardly-extending portion forms the upper edge, or a substantial portion of the upper edge, of the blade. If preferred, and particularly in the case of a goalkeepers stick, the insert may comprise two superposed members.

Referring now by numerals to the drawings, Figure 1 shows the preferred form of stick. I is the handle member. The lower end is forked or bifurcated to provide a portion extending downwardly in the direction of the handle, and a forwardly-extending portion 2.

Secured to and between the portions H and I2, say, as with a suitable adhesive, such as glue, for instance, is an insert I3, the insert forming with the two portions, the blade of the stick. The portion I I thus defines the heel of the blade, while the portion l2 defines its upper edge. If preferred, a dowel pin l4, say of wood, is inserted through the portion II and into the insert 3.

Preferably, wood strips, known as flakes, I5, are secured to opposite faces of the handle member In, these extending downwardly to the lower edge of the blade. As is known, such flakes in composite hocket sticks, as in composite racquets, are economical of use and serve a useful purpose.

In the modified form of stick shown in Figure 3, the handle 20 is made of two separate members 26A and 203 secured together, say, as with glue.

The inner member provide a portion 22,

20B is curved forwardly to while the outer member 20A extends downwardly to provide the heel portion 2|. The insert 23 is secured to and between the spaced portions 2| and 22. Flakes (not shown) similar to the flakes shown by the numeral l5, are preferably provided.

The modified form shown in Figure 5 is the same as that shown in Figure 3, except that the heel portion HA is curved rearwardly instead of being straight, and the insert |3A is shaped accordingly.

In the form shown in Figure 4, the forwardly extending portion 32 is not an integral part of the handle 30, but is a separate piece, which is secured, say by glueing. to the handle 30. The insert 33 is secured to and between the portions 32 and 3|.

In the form shown in Figure 6, the forwardlyextending portion 42 is an integral .part of the handle 40, but the heel portion 4| is a piece separate from the handle, to which it is secured as, say, by glueing.

The form shown in Figure 7 is the same as that shown in Figure 1, except that the forwardly-extending portion IZB of the handle 50 does not extend the entire length of the upper edge of the insert I3B.

In the form shown in Figure 8, a strip 83, say, of basswood, is inserted between the insert 82 and the portion 8| of the handle 80. If preferred, such a strip may be used in the other forms of sticks shown.

In the form of stick shown in Figure 9, which is adapted for goalkeeping, the insert may comprise two superposed members 92 and 93, and if preferred, a strip 83A, say of basswood, may

be inserted between the portion 9! of the handle 90 and the two blade members 92 and 93.

In all of the forms of stick shown, it is preferable that the inserts, Which form part of the blade, should have their grain running at an angle to the grain of the handle. In other words, the grain of the insert should preferably run longitudinally of the insert stock, while the grain of the handle should preferably run longitudinally of the handle stock.

What I claim is:

1. In a composite hockey stick, a handle member comprising two complementary inner and outer members secured together, said inner member having the lower portion thereof curved forwardly to form at least part of the upper portion of the blade of the stick, the lower portion of said outer member forming atleast part of the heel of the blade, and means" secured between said lower portions completing therewith the blade of the stick.

2. In a composite hockey stick, a member forming the handle of the stick and having at the lower end thereof two relatively diverging portions at least one of which is integral with the stock of said member, and means not being an integral part of the stock of said handle secured between said portions and completing therewith the blade of the stick, one of said vportions defining at least a portion of the upper edge of the blade and the other portion defining at least a portion of the heel of the blade.

3. In a composite hockey stick, a member forming the handle of the stick and having at the lower end thereof two relatively diverging portions integral with the stock of said member,

one of said portions being curved forwardly and defining at least a portion of the upper edge of the blade of the stick and the other portion defining the heel of the blade of the stick, and means secured between said portions and forming therewith the blade of the stick.

REGINALD M. WERLICH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2569395 *Jun 16, 1948Sep 25, 1951Lovell Mfg CoLaminated hockey stick
US3982760 *Nov 26, 1974Sep 28, 1976Karhu-Titan OyStick for hockey or the like
US4059269 *Feb 13, 1976Nov 22, 1977Karhu-Titan OyHockey stick or the like, particularly blade structure thereof
US5192259 *Jul 18, 1991Mar 9, 1993Budolfson Robert AExercise system
US5407195 *Oct 6, 1992Apr 18, 1995K.C.G. Hockey Finland OyBlade construct for a hockey stick or the like
US5636836 *Jun 6, 1995Jun 10, 1997Glastic CorporationHockey stick shaft
US5810682 *Jan 29, 1996Sep 22, 1998Carruthers; Andrew D.Hockey stick blade pad
US7097577Apr 16, 2004Aug 29, 2006Jas. D. Easton, Inc.Hockey stick
US7144343Dec 23, 2005Dec 5, 2006Jas. D. Easton, Inc.Hockey stick
US7232386Oct 20, 2003Jun 19, 2007Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7422532Jul 10, 2006Sep 9, 2008Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7789778Dec 3, 2008Sep 7, 2010Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7850553Jul 11, 2006Dec 14, 2010Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7862456Jun 18, 2007Jan 4, 2011Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7914403Aug 6, 2008Mar 29, 2011Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US7963868May 15, 2003Jun 21, 2011Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US8216096Jun 6, 2011Jul 10, 2012Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
US8517868Jul 9, 2012Aug 27, 2013Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey stick
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/562
International ClassificationA63B59/14, A63B59/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B59/14
European ClassificationA63B59/14