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Publication numberUS2305339 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1942
Filing dateMar 13, 1942
Priority dateMar 13, 1942
Publication numberUS 2305339 A, US 2305339A, US-A-2305339, US2305339 A, US2305339A
InventorsDeutscher Samuel
Original AssigneeDeutscher Samuel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fur slitting machine
US 2305339 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. l5, 1942. s. DEUTSCHER l FUR SLITTING MACHINE Filed Maroh 13, 1942 ,S'A M un f'z/rs CHER INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 15, 1942 2,305,339 f FUR sLITTlNGMACHINE Samuel Deutscher, f Brooklyn, .N. Y'.

Application .March 13, 1942;.Serial`N. 434,467

9 Claims; l (Cl. 16473')` My invention relates to iur` slittingmachines and has particular referenceto machinesor cutting -furs or pelts into narrow. strips as. required for the preparation Y of. fur. garments.

MyY invention has for itsobject to provide. a

machine for cuttingA a piece of fur into narroviT strips of desiredY width,. using a plurality oi knives mounted on. a. commonsupporting'` bar, which can be movedsimultaneously over apiece of fur, stretched`v on a supporting board..l In.)

order. to facilitate the rearrangement ofv` the knives on the supporting'board for. a desired spacing, I providel my knives with hinged shanks, sothat certain knives can be raised intoA aninoperative position by turning-,thershankson the.`

hinges.

Another object of' my invention istoprovide a-supporting board for. the fur which can be turned into any desired position for slitting'the fur. in `a desiredangular direction.

Another objectof my invention-is to provide a supporting boardfor the furwith a-pluralityof sharppins. In order to uniformly impale the fur on theV pins, I provide la clamping-boardwith holes-for the pins, the board being placed onthe fur. and pressure applied until the pins penetrate the fur to a, uniform depth.4 The clamping board may bei provided with through slots for guiding the knives during the cutting operation.

Another object of my invention islto provide means to stretch the fur over the. pins, the stretching. meansA remaining inV position When the'top board. is placed onf-the fur.

Still another object'of my inventionsto provide means to Aprint consecutive numbers or symbols on the stripswhen the fur is being out.Y

ivry-invention is more fuuiy describedvin-the accompanying speciicationA and drawing, in which:

Fig; lis aside View of my" apparatus partly in section. showing knives at right angles to the holder;

Fig; 2 isa fractional 'top' plan' view or the' same;

Fig. 3` is a detail View of a knife assembly;

Fig. 4 is a top plan view of the knife';

Fig. 5.is a fractional plan `View ofy the knives assembled at an angle;

Figs. 6 and 7 are views'oi a fur stretching device;

Fig. 8 is afractional view oi a knife guiding plate;

Fig. Sima-similar view of a modified guiding y plate ;v

Fig.' 10 .isa sectionalviewv ofthe same; i

Figs. 114 andi 12" are detail views or markingA` device.

My fur` slittingV apparatus consists of al plurality of`knives, shown in detail in Figs; 3; 4'and 5, comprising thin` blades removably fitted' in holders-2. The bladesmay be conveniently made of ordinary razor blades by. breaking or splitting them into parts of.V triangular shapel and providingwith sharp points for piercingand cutof a printing vvtingfurs. .The-holder- 2 has pins' 3`engagng corresponding'holes in the blade,.the ends of the pins entering also holes in a clamping plate 4 which isY held against the holderby L J-shaped clamps/5 and 6 pivoted at Tand. 9. Theholder plate has a straightshank oonsistingof a front portion -8 extending atianangle to the rear edge of the plate. 2 and a rear portion T8 pivotally connected With-the portioni atY T9. The rear shank portions 'i8 are heldv tightly in place by a clamping bar 8lV fastened to a supporting plate I6 by screwsIS-,the bar extending. to the hinge 19. The Vblade portion is held by a second clamp'- ing bar 82 removably fastened-with screvvs''. The` bar extends to the other side of the hinge 19.v For removingA certain of the knives`orvplacing them into an inoperative position, the "bar82 is removed, and the'seknivesare Vturned upv/)ard on theirhinge; as shown in' Fig: 1` o'rj in dotted lines in Fig. 3. The ba'rflZ'is` then replaced, holding the 'operative andY inoperativelknives' in their'respective positions;

In. orderv to keep `the knives properly'spaced when alternate'knives'are removed, spacers-"8d are provided, rotativelyV mounted on pins-'85. When turned inward, the spacers'take'the lplace of the missing knives. Plates 20/ and -23provide additional'support for'the knives` on-the'' plate I6. y

Rollers 18% may be'vprovi'ded atltheunder side of the k-nivesfor holding-down the; fur aslitlis beirilgf:cut;L Y

Forq guiding and supporting? theknifef holding plate Ii; it isi-provided `withfa hanger 'i5' lwith a hook-on top--slidably engaginga rail 1H. The rail pins 34 extending from a supporting platef'l. The pins :34 extend inrrows' spaced at thefsame the grooves 98 for the pins.

rail 4 I distances apart as the knives, so that the latter pass between the pins without touching them while slitting the fur. The board rotates on a central pin 11 so that it can be placed in a desired angular position in relation to the rail 4I. The pins 34 are spaced for three principal directions: right and left, and 90 to the rail.

For impalng a piece of fur on the pins 34, a board 81, Figs. 6 and '1, may be employed. The board has holes 88 corresponding to the pins 34 and has also dowel pins 89 at the ends, engaging holes 90 in the base 39. The board 81 is removed when on the pins 34. The fur may be stretched during this operation by 4pulling on its edge, using sharp hooks 9I for this purpose (Figs. 6 and 7), the hooks being provided on the endsof thin bars 92 joined together by a cross-bar 93. The latter is held in a hand for pulling the fur, the board 81 being then pressed against the fur. The bars nt between the rows of the pins and under the board as shown in Figs. 6 and 7.

A modified arrangement for holding the fur the fur is properly impaled on the pins is shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 10. AA

board 94 is used for this purpose, provided with transverse slots 95 extending between the rows of the pins. Grooves 96, Fig. 8, are provided on the under side of the board for the ends of the pins. fur with the slots 95 movement of the knives. The blades I of the knives extend into slots for cutting the fur, the slots forming guides for the knives. AThe The board is held tightly against thef extending in direction of' rollers 86 are not needed when the board 94 is used. The board may be made of a transparentl vmaterial and provided with numbers 1, 2,

3, etc., at the sides in order to watch the cuts when the middle portions of the slots are covered by the board I6. 99 may be used when it is desired to cut straight strips. Holes 91 may be employed instead of The board 94 may have right or left hand diagonal or -bias slots A board 98 with straight slotsr 95. For convenience in planning the work, the

knives on the board or plate I6 may be numbered as well as the rows of the pins 34. Lines may be drawn, preferably in diierent colors, on the board 16 between the rows of the pins.

Several plates I6 may be provided with the holes spaced for different distances between the knives. Saddles IDO may be placed on the knives for keeping them apart when the spacing is larger than the thickness of the knife shank.

- The pins 34 may be formed on blades 34', as

` shown in Fig. 10.

-For slitting the fur or pelt 26, it is stretched on the plate 16 and held by the pins 34, ythe placed on the posts 48 or screws at a desired height, so that the knife points will just penetrate the skin. The plate I5 is then moved over the rail, the knives cutting slits in the fur. The strips thus obtained vremain attached to the plate 35 by the pins 34 and cannot therefore become displaced and damaged during the cutting operation as invariably happens with multiple knives without such support for the strips.

It is often required to cut the fur into diagonal or 'bias strips, usually at an angle of fifteen degrees. The board 16 is then turned on its pin 11 to a desired vposition in relation to the rail 4I.

with the knife holding plate I6 being 49 and fixed by they For a very long knife-holding plate I6, two

rails 4I may be employed, one at each end of the plate.

The bar I6 with the knives may be raised while the fur is being stretched on the pins 34. The front screw 50 is removed for this purpose and the rear screw is loosened so that the bar can be rotated on the rear screw and supported at an elevation during stretching of the fur.

A clamping bar 28 may be `provided at the end of the board 16, hinged at 3I and being held against the Aboard by a screw 32. The bar is provided with raised character or numbers 42, as shown in Figs. ll and 12, at the under side for printing the numbers on the strips of the fur. Holes 33 are provided in the bar for the pins 34.

It is understood that my fur slitting machine may be further modified without departing from the spirit of the invention, as set forth inthe appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

l. A iur slitting machine comprising a base; means to support a piece of fur on the base; a bar slidably supported above the base; a plurality of knives with shanks on the barV adapted to out the fur into strips when the barV is moved, the knife shanks having rear and front portions hinged together, the front portions being adapted to be turned into an inoperative position; means to attach the rear portions to the bar; and means to attach the front portions of the Shanks to the bar with the knives in an operative position or to support the front portions in an inoperative position.

2. A fur slitting machine comprising a base; means to support a piece of fur on the base; a bar slidably supported above the base; a plurality of knives with shanks on the bar adapted to out the fur into strips when the bar is moved, the knife Shanks having rear and front portions hinged together, the front portions being adapted to be turned into an inoperative position; means to attach the rear portions to the bar; means to attach the front portions of the shanks to the bar with the knives in an operative position or to support the front portions in an inoperative position; and means on the knives to keep them apart when alternate knives are raised into an inoperative position.

3. A fur slitting machine comprising a base; means to support a piece of fur on the base; a bar slidably supported above the base; a plurality of knives with Shanks on the bar adapted to out the fur into strips when the bar is moved, the knife shanks having rear and front portions hinged together, the front portions being adapted to be turned into an inoperative position; means to attach the rear portions to the bar; means Vto at-v tach the front portions of the shanks to the bar with the knives in an operative position or to support the front portions in an inoperative position; and spaces rotatively supported on the knives adapted to be moved into an operative position for separating the knives when alternate knives are raised.

4. A fur slitting machine comprising a base; a board rotatively supported on the base; means on the board to support a piece of fur; means to cut the fur into strips; and means to imprint symbols on the strips.

5. A fur slitting machine comprising a base; a board rotatively supported on the base; means on the board -to support a piece of fur; means to cut on the board; and means on the underside of the member to imprint identifying symbols on the strips.

6. A fur slitting machine comprising a base; a board on the base; a plurality of steel blades supported edgewise on the board at equal distances apart; sharp points on the upper edges of the blades adapted to support a piece of fur; and means to slit the fur into strips.

7. A fur slitting machine comprising a base; means to support apiece of fur on the base; a bar slidably supported above the base; a plurality of knives with shanks on the bar adapted to cut the fur into strips when the bar is moved, the knife shanks having rear and front portions hinged together, the front portions being adapted to be turned into an inoperative position; means to attach the rear portions to the bar; means to attach the front portions of the shanks to the bar with the knives in an operative position or to support the front portions in an inoperative position; and extensions on the under sides of the knives for pressing the fur against the supporting means.

8. A fur slitting machine comprising a base; means to support a piece of fur on the base; a bar slidably supported above the base; a plurality of 25 knives with shanks on the bar adapted to cut the fur into strips when the bar is moved, the knife Shanks having rear and front portions hinged together, the front portions being adapted to be turned into an inoperative position; means to attach the rear portions to the bar; means to attach the front portions of the Shanks to the bar with the knives in an operative position or to support the front portions in an inoperative position; and rollers supported on the under sides of the knives in front of the cutting edges for pressing the fur against its supporting means.

9. A fur slitting machine comprising a board; a plurality of equally spaced sharp pins extending upward from the board adapted to support a piece of fur to be cut into strips; a clamping board for the fur having holes for the pins for impaling the fur on the pins; a flat member with a plurality of prongs adapted to extend between rows of the pins; and hooks on the ends of the prongs for en- -gaging the fur, the member being adapted to be used for stretching the fur over the board prior to being impaled on the pins and adapted to remain under the clamping board.

SAMUEL DEUTSCHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2677313 *May 26, 1951May 4, 1954Mergenthaler Linotype GmbhChannel forming machine
US2833350 *Jan 24, 1955May 6, 1958Irving I MerkurFilm cutting apparatus
US3208374 *Jun 25, 1962Sep 28, 1965Louis T HeinMeans of marking identification on pelts
US6508154 *Oct 12, 2000Jan 21, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Integrated circuit package separators
US6718858 *Mar 22, 2000Apr 13, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Integrated circuit package separators
US6920815Feb 5, 2004Jul 26, 2005Micron Technology, Inc.Integrated circuit package separators
US6945151 *Oct 12, 2000Sep 20, 2005Micron Technology, Inc.Integrated circuit package separators
US7276397Feb 5, 2004Oct 2, 2007Micron Technology, Inc.Integrated circuit package separator methods
US7367252Aug 30, 2005May 6, 2008Micron Technology, Inc.Integrated circuit package separators
US7513182Aug 30, 2005Apr 7, 2009Micron Technology, Inc.Integrated circuit package separators
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/4, 83/915, 83/222, 83/614
International ClassificationC14B15/10
Cooperative ClassificationC14B15/10, Y10S83/915
European ClassificationC14B15/10