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Publication numberUS2305666 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1942
Filing dateJun 27, 1941
Priority dateJun 27, 1941
Publication numberUS 2305666 A, US 2305666A, US-A-2305666, US2305666 A, US2305666A
InventorsBolsey Jacques
Original AssigneeBolsey Jacques
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Winding mechanism
US 2305666 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

22 1942. J BOLSEYI 2305 656 WINDING MECHANISM Filed June 27, 1941 2 Sheets-$heet l INVENTOR 2 Jaegaes fialusey BY Dec. 22, 1942. J. BOLSEY 2,305,666

WINDING MECHANISM Filed June 27, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 YI/III/IIIIII/IIII/IIE 51270110011110!!! mil" Patented Dec. 22, 1942 UNITED STATEfd OFFICE 4 Claims.

My invention relates to spring motor driven cameras, and more particularly to built-in or independent winding mechanisms for spring motors of such cameras.

A general object of my invention is the provision of built-in or independent winding means enabling quick and easy winding-up of the spring.

Another object my invention consists of means by which the time needed for winding-up the camera spring is shortened.

Still another object of my invention is to equalize the work during winding-up of the spring, 1. e., to avoid interruption in winding-up f the spring by periods of useless turning of the winding member.

With the above objects in view, my present invention consists of a built-in or independent winding mechanism for a spring motor being constructed in such a manner as to be adapted to up the spring of said spring motor by turning the rotatabl winding member of said winding mechanism in either direction.

By these means the time of winding is shortened, the winding-up itself is made easy, and interruption in winding-up of the spring by periods of useless turning of the winding handle or knob is avoided.

The novel features which I consider as characteristic for my invention are set forth in particular in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its construction and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof will be best understood from the following description of specific embodiments, when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figs. 1 and 2 show various embodiments of the new winding mechanism, with two train gears and no coaxially arranged main gears;

Fig. 3 is a side view of another embodiment of the new winding mechanism, with a winding gear equipped with internal teeth and two ratchet wheels;

Fig. 4; is a cross section of the winding mechanism shown in Fig. 3, along line 44 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a cross section of a mechanism similar to the one shown in Fig. 3, but equipped with one ratchet wheel only;

Fig. 6 is a side view of the mechanism shown in Fig. 5, along line G6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a cross section of a mechanism similar to the one shown in Fig. 5, but equipped with two friction couplings;

Fig. 8 is a cross-section of the mechanism shown in Fig. '7, along line 88 of Fig. '7;

Fig. 9 is a view of another embodiment of my invention with two main gears equipped both with external teeth and two friction couplings;

Fig. 10 is a cross-section of the mechanism shown in Fig. 9, along line -40 of Fig. 9;

Figs. 11 and 12 show another embodiment of my invention with a lever system, in plane view and side view;

Figs. 13 and 14 show a modified embodiment of the winding mechanism shown in Figs. 11 and 12, in plane and side View;

Figs. 15 and 16 show two other embodiments of my invention.

All. winding mechanisms shown in the drawings are arranged in spring motor driven cameras for winding up the coiled power spring I of the camera spring motor. This power spring is carried by a shaft 2, i. e., its one end is fixed to this shaft while its other end is fixed to the spring casing, not shown in the drawings. Thus, by turning shaft 2 in winding-up direction, the spring is wound up.

Although not shown in each of the figures, in all embodiments described below shaft 2 is provided with 3, blocking mechanism 3 permitting rotation of said shaft 2 relative to the camera casing i in winding -up direction only. This blocking mechanism may consist of a ratchet wheel 5 secured to shaft 2 and a pawl ii pivoted to camera casing 4; however, also other clutching or coupling means may be used for limiting the rotation of shaft 2 in the manner indicated above.

The winding mechanism shown in Fig. 1 comprises a driving gear 7 fixed to shaft 2, a winding gear 8 fixed to a shaft rotating in a bearing in camera casing t, not shown in the drawing; winding means, e. g., a winding handle 9, are arranged for turning winding gear 8 in both directions; furthermore, two separate gear trains consisting of the intermediate gears H], II, and i2, 13, M, respectively, are arranged between the main gears, i. e., the winding gear 0 and the driving gear i; the end gears l0, l2 and II, I4 of these gear trains are in constant mesh with gears 1 and 8, respectively. In order to attain the objects of my invention I propose that one of these gear trains consist of an even number of intermediate gears, i. e., the two gears I0 and l I, while the other has to consist of an odd number of intermediate gears, i. e., the three gears l2, l3 and 14; in each of these gear trains I propose to include clutching means, enabling turning of the gears ll and I4, meshing with the driving gear 1 in winding-up direction only.

In the preferred embodiment of my invention shown in Fig. l, at least two gears of each gear train are arranged coaxially and connected by ratchet pawl mechanisms l5 and it only; thus, gears H] and i3 are able to turn the corresponding ccaxially arranged gears H and M in one direction only, i. e., the gears H and M meshing with the driving gear l are turned in winding-up direction only.

It is evident that by turning the winding handle 9, i. e., winding gear 8, in either direction, driving gear 7 is always turned in the direction indicated by arrow it; thus, the power spring I connected with and carried by shaft 2 is wound up by turning of the winding handle Q in either direction.

A detailed description of the mode of operation of this winding mechanism seems to be superfluous: everybody skilled in this art is without difliculty able to ascertain that it works in the way indicated above.

The winding mechanism shown in Fig. 2, is a modified embodiment of the winding-up mechanism shown in Fig. l. The sole difference is that one of the gear trains consists of one intermediate gear it and the other of two intermediate gears IQ and 2B. The function of these intermediate gears and the mode of operation of this winding mechanism is the same, as explained in connection with Fig. 1.

In Figs. 3 to 8 winding mechanisms with identical characteristic features are shown: although they differ in details of their construction, each of them comprises two main toothed gears arranged freely rotatable on the spring shaft 2, clutching means enabling turning of said shaft by each of said main gears in winding-up direction only, a gear train with an odd number of intermediate gears between said main gears, and a winding member secured to one of these main gears, said winding mechanism enabling winding-up of said power spring by turning of the Winding member in either direction.

As mentioned above, each of the various embodiments shown in these figures is constructed differently:

The winding mechanism shown in Figs. 3 and 4 comprises one main gear El provided with internal teeth 22, and another main gear 23 provided with external teeth 24, both arranged freely rotatable on spring shaft 2. An intermediate gear 25 is freely rotatable pivoted to camera casing 4 and in mesh with both said gears El and 23. Ratchet wheels 26 and 2! are secured to shaft 2 and cooperate with pawls 28 and 29 pivoted to gears 23 and 2!, respectively. A winding handle 3b is hinged to winding gear 25.

The winding mechanism shown in Figs. 5 and 6 is substantially the same with the sole difference that only one single ratchet wheel Si is arranged instead of the two ratchet wheels 2% and 2?, and that both pawls 2t and 29 engage this single ratchet wheel 3! instead of meshing each separately one of the ratchet wheels 26 and 21.

The mechanism shown in Figs. 7 and 8 is also similar to the mechanism shown in the above figures. In this embodiment, however, I provide as clutching means two friction couplings 32 and 33 between shaft 2 and gears 2i and 23, respectively, instead of the ratchet mechanisms described above. These friction couplings are arranged in such a manner that shaft 2 is turned only if the respective gear 2! or 23 is turned in winding-up direction. As friction couplings working in the required manner, various wellknown clutching means may be used: thus, for instance, I have indicated in the drawing a friction coupling consisting of a conical cut-out in the respective gear body adjacent to the shaft and a cylindrical freely rotatable coupling member therein. This coupling device is adapted to couple the shaft to the gear during rotation in one direction only.

The mode of operation of the three embodiments shown in Figs. 3 to 8 is also easy to understand by anybody skilled in this art; therefore, no detailed description thereof seems necessary.

In the embodiment of my invention shown in Figs. 9 and 10 I provide two main toothed gears E i and 35 with external teeth arranged freely rotatable on spring shaft 2; I furthermore provide clutching means, e. g., friction couplings 35 and 31 of the type described above, enabling turning of shaft 2 by each of the gears 33 and 35 in winding-up direction only; I also arrange a gear train with an odd number of intermediate gears, e. g., three gears 38, and '55 between gears 3' 1 and As shown in Fig. 10, the winding handle ii is arranged freely rotatable on shaft 2 and secured by means of pins or screws 42 to gear Zil; thus, handle 4! can be turned independently of shaft 2 and is adapted to turn gear 34 in either direction. A control of the mode of op eration of this winding mechanism will show that it works also in the desired way, i. e., by turning of handle -H in either direction shaft 2 is always turned the direction indicated by arrow ll-i.

I want to note that I may provide friction couplings between one of the gears 39 or ill and shaft M carrying these gears instead of providing th friction coupling 36 between gear 35 and shaft I also may arrange these gears 39 and 4:) on separate shafts and connect them by a ratchet mechanism only, as described in connection with Figs. 1 and 2. I may, however, also omit both friction couplings 36 and El and substitute ratchet mechanisms, as shown in Figs. 3 to 8.

Still another embodiment of my invention is shown in Figs. 11 and 12. This winding mechanism comprises a main winding gear 152 secured to the freely rotatable shaft bi, a winding handle Mi secured to said winding gear, two gear trains, one of them consisting of an even number of gears, i. e., the two gears 47 and 48 and the other of an odd number of gears, i. e., the single gear Q9. One end gear of each gear train, i. e., gears 41 and 49 are meshing constantly with winding gear ib. These gear trains are secured to a lever system carried freely rotatable by shaft 5i, carrying the main winding gear 35, too.

The mode of operation of this winding mechanism is the following:

By turning the winding handle t6 the winding wheel 55 is turned. When turning the winding wheel in clockwise direction, lever 50 is turned by action of the gears 'll and 48 in counter-clockwise direction and gear 48 comes thereby in mesh with the driving gear 52 secured to shaft 2, as described above. Thus, by turning handle it in clockwise direction, gear 52 and thereby shaft 2 re turned in clockwise direction too. When handle and thereby gear 45 are turned in counter-clockwise direction, the lever system 50 is turned in clockwise direction and thereby gear 49 comes in mesh with gear 52 and turns this gear in clockwise direction. Thus it is evident that by turning handle 46 in either direction gear 52 and thereby shaft 2 are always turned in clockwise direction.

The embodiment shown in Figs. 13 and 14 is very similar to the one above described. The sole difference is that the lever system 53 is carried by a separate shaft 54 and the main winding gear 55 to which handle 56 is secured is carried excentrically on the 1ever system 53. This winding mechanism works in the same way as the one described above.

The winding mechanism shown in Fig. 15 comprises a ratchet wheel 51 secured to shaft 2, two ratchet pawls 58 and 59 adapted to turn the ratchet wheel 51 in the same direction, and a member 60 to which pawls 5B and 59 are pivoted. This member 60 is arranged turnably about an axis parallel to spring shaft 2; furthermore, springs Bi and 62 are arranged, pressing pawls 58 and 59 against the teeth of ratchet wheel 51.

The winding handle 63 is secured to member 60.

Pins 64 secured to the camera casing cooperate with projection 65 on member 60 in order to limit the angle of turning of this pawl-carrying member.

Fig. 16 shows a similar embodiment: however,

two ratchet wheels 66 and 61 are provided instead of one ratchet wheel. Ratchet wheel 66 and gear 68 are carried by spring shaft 2, while ratchet wheel 61 and gear 69, meshing gear 68, are carried by a parallel shaft 10. The two pawls H and 12 are pivoted to the double lever 13 and pressed by springs 14 against the teeth of the ratchet wheels 56 and 61; they are working in different directions and turn thereby the ratchet wheels 65 and 68 in opposite directions. Lever 13 is arranged freely rotatable on shaft 15 and carries the winding handle 16.

The mode of operation of the embodiments shown in Figs, 15 and 16 is the same as described above in connection with the other embodiments of my invention.

I want to note that my invention is in no way limited to the specific embodiments shown: thus, when using gear trains I may change the number of thegears of each gear train within the limits of my invention, i. e., when an odd number of gears is required for a gear train I may provide one, three, five, seven, nine, or more, but always an odd number, of gears. In the same way, when the gear train has to be formed of an even number of gears, I may use two, four, six, eight, or more, but always an even number, of gears.

I may also use instead of the ratchet mechanisms and the friction couplings described above the most different coupling devices if they are only working in the same way as these mechanisms.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above, or two or more together, may also find a useful application in other types of winding mechanisms differing from the types described above.

While I have illustrated and described the invention as embodied in winding mechanisms, I do not intend to be limited to the details shown, since various modifications and structural changes may be made Without departing in any way from the spirit of my invention.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of my invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute essential characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention, and therefore such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and range of equivalency of the following claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A mechanism for rotating a shaft, comprising a ratchet wheel fixed to said shaft, two ratchet pawls adapted to turn said ratchet wheel in the same direction, a member to which said pawls are turnably pivoted, said member arranged turnably about an axis parallel to said shaft, springs pressing said pawls against the teeth of said ratchet wheel, and a winding member secured to the member carrying said pawls.

2. In a mechanism, according to claim 1, means limiting the turning of said pawl-carrying member.

3. A mechanism for rotating a shaft comprising a first ratchet wheel fixed to said spring shaft, a first gear fixed to saidspring shaft, a second gear in mesh with said first gear, a second shaft carrying said second gear, av second ratchet wheel fixed to said second shaft, two ratchet pawls each engaging one of said ratchet wheels in such a manner as to turn them in opposite directions, a member to which said pawls are turnably pivoted, said member arranged tumably about an axis parallel to said spring shafts, springs pressing said pawls against the teeth of said ratchet wheel, and a winding member secured to the member carrying said pawls.

4. A mechanism for rotating a shaft, comprising at least one ratchet wheel cooperating with said shaft, two ratchet pawls adapted to turn said ratchet wheel or wheels, a member to which said pawls are turnably pivoted, said member arranged turnably about an axis parallel to said shaft, and winding means secured to the member carrying said pawls.

JACQUES BOLSEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2667810 *Feb 20, 1951Feb 2, 1954Harry N SeversenDevice for advancing film strips
US2757545 *Aug 4, 1953Aug 7, 1956Elgin Nat Watch CoPower take-off device, particularly for timepieces
US2757555 *Aug 4, 1953Aug 7, 1956Elgin Nat Watch CoPawl and ratchet mechanism
US2867078 *Oct 11, 1952Jan 6, 1959Scott Charles GSelf-winding mechanism for watches
US3026732 *Sep 3, 1958Mar 27, 1962Rene Corvisier LouisDevice for transferring motion through an imperforate seal
US5701785 *Mar 6, 1996Dec 30, 1997Liu; JackDriving structure of the external rotary disk of the crystal ball
US7896542 *Dec 1, 2009Mar 1, 2011The Swatch Group Research And Development LtdTimepiece movement fitted with a vibrating alarm
US8305848Dec 1, 2009Nov 6, 2012The Swatch Group Research And Development LtdTimepiece movement fitted with an inertial coupling mechanism
US8500324Dec 21, 2010Aug 6, 2013The Swatch Group Research And Development LtdTimepiece movement fitted with a vibrating alarm
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/126, 368/147, 219/121.6, 74/143, 185/39
International ClassificationG03B19/04
Cooperative ClassificationG03B19/04
European ClassificationG03B19/04