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Publication numberUS2306821 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 29, 1942
Filing dateMay 17, 1941
Priority dateMay 17, 1941
Publication numberUS 2306821 A, US 2306821A, US-A-2306821, US2306821 A, US2306821A
InventorsRoscoe I Markey
Original AssigneePollak Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disconnect plug
US 2306821 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. 1. MARKEY DISCONNECT PLUG 2 She ets-Sheet 1 Dec. 29, 1942.

Filed May 17, 1941 Fl! 1; l

INVENTOR ROSCOE LMARKEY ATTORNEY Dec. 29, 1942. R. MARKEY 2,306,821

DISCONNECT PLUG Filed May 17, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 LlEl- ENTOR ROSC I. MARKEY QAW ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 29, 1942 2.306.821 DISCONNECT PLUG Roscoe I. Marker, East Orange, N. 3., assignor to Pollak Manufacturing Company, Arlington, N. 3., a corporation of New Jersey Application May 1'1, 1941, Serial No. 393,885 I 4 Claims.

The invention relates to disconnect plugs.

Plugs of this type are used when it is desirable to provide a separable connection between two cables each carrying a plurality of electric connecting wires or between one such cable and a stationary member.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a disconnect plug of extreme simplicity so that it readily lends itself to economics of manufacture and ease of assembly. Another object is to provide a plug in which the possibility of short circuiting will be practically eliminated. Another object is to provide a plug which may be easily and quickly taken apart for inspection purposes.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent as this specification proceeds. Referring to the drawings forming a part thereof:

Fig. l is a longitudinal sectional view;

Figs. 2 and 3 are cross-sectional views taken on the lines 2-2 and 3-3, respectively, of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an elevational view partly in section of a slightly modified form.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary longitudinal section of another modified form; and

Figs. 6, 7, and 8 are cross-sectional views taken on the lines 6-6, 1-1, and 8-8 of Fig. 5; and

Fig. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 5 with the locking ring moved to the disassembling position.

Referring again to the drawings and particularly to Figs. 1 to 3 the reference numeral lo designates that part of the disconnect plug which may be secured to a cable or conduit II. The associated part, indicated generally by the reference numeral l2 might be secured to a wall or switchboard panel or to another cable.

The plug proper l0 comprises a tubular shell having a longitudinally extending groove H5 at what might be termed its open end when assembled with its associated parts. At the end of the groove it an annular flange i1 is formed on the shell.

The fiange I'I acts as a shoulder to limit the forward movement of a freely rotatable nut 18 which has an inwardly extending flange ill to cooperate with the flange H. The nut has knurled portions 2i to facilitate its being rotated. Obviously the nut is positioned on the shell before the other parts of the plug are assembled.

The rear portion of the shell has a longitudinally extending bead 22 on its inside surface and this bead extends inwardly as far as a shoulder 23. An insert 24 of plastic insulating material has a plurality of grooves 25 one of which engages the bead 22. The shoulder 23 acts as a stop to properly position the insert 24 which is a snug fit in the shell and is prevented from any rotation by the bead and groove.

A plurality of contact pins 28 are molded into the insert 24. Any number of these pins may be used, only two being illustrated for sake of simplicity. The forward ends of the pins extend into the open space defined by the forward part of the shell and co-operate with suitable openings in the member i2, hereinafter described. The rear ends of the pins are secured to electrical connections 21 carried by the cable ii,

A housing so is mounted on and secured to the rear end of the shell IS. The housing 30 has an enlargement on its forward end in which is formed a shoulder 3!. The shoulder 3i butts up against the rear end of the sleeve l5 and also is in contact with the rear peripheral edge of the insert 2|. Thus the insert is positively held against any longitudinal movement by virtue of its being confined between the shoulder 3! on the housing 30 and the shoulder 23 on the shell l5.

Means are provided for securing the housing 30 to the shell i5 so as to prevent any rotational movement between these members. The shell is provided with an aperture 32 and the housing has a notch 33 which intersects an annular groove 34. An open locking ring 35 is sprung into the groove 34 and a toe 36 on one end of the locking ring is entered into the notch 33 and aperture 32. The end of the notch 33 is slabbed off as indicated at 31 so as to permit the ready entrance of a suitable tool if it is desired to remove the locking ring for separation of the parts.

The rear end of the housing is enlarged and is exteriorly threaded for the reception of a retaining nut Ill. The enlarged end of the housing and the end of the retaining nut form what might be termed a V-shaped opening in which is confined a ring or washer 4| formed of a resilient material. The openings in the end of the nut and the housing are approximately the same diameter as the cable H and it will be apparent that as the nut 40 is drawn up the washer M will be pressed against the cable with suificient pressure to prevent any possibility of the cable turning in relation to the housing and at the same time will not harm the cable.

From the foregoing it will be evident that a simple efficient plug has been provided. The parts are economical to manufacture and may be assembled with the greatest of ease. no possibility of the parts turning in relation to each other and this is of great importance particularly where the cable and plug are carrying five or six connections such as is often the case. The turning of the cable in relation to the housing or the turning of the housing in relation to the shell will cause short circuits in the electric connections which is both serious and annoying. Another advantage resides in the fact of the plug being adapted to be quickly disassembled for inspection purposes. All one has to do is to loosen co the nut 40 and remove the locking ring 35. The

There is.

parts may then be slid back on the cable and the electric connections are all exposed.

As illustrated the member I2 comprises a body portion 50 which carries an insert 5! of insulating material. The body portion 50 is exteriorly threaded at 52 for engagement with the threads on the nut l8. A head 53 is formed on the inner side of th neck part of the body portion and this head engages the groove 16 when the parts l and I2 are being put together. The nut I8 being free to rotate and the parts In and I2 being held against rotation, obviously the turning of the nut will draw the parts together.

Referring to Fig. 4 the construction is quite similar to that heretofore described and like parts will bear like reference numerals. In this form the housing 30 may be brazed to member 60 carrying the electrical connections. The locking ring 35 in addition to securing the housing 30 and shell l5 together and preventing rotational movement of these parts in relation to each other functions to prevent the freely rotatable nut I8 from undue rearward movement.

The housing 30 has an annular flange 6| on its forward end which abuts the flange IT on the shell IS. The shell l5 has an inwardly extending flange 62 on its forward end and the insert 24 is confined between this flange and the shoulder 3| of the shell.

In Figures 5 to 9 similar parts bear similar reference numerals. In this form the locking.

ring 65 does not have a toe and functions only to prevent longitudinal movement or separation of the shell I5 and housing 30.

In order to prevent rotational movement between the shell and housing the shell is provided with a bead 66 which engages a groove 61 in the housing. To permit of assembly the flange IQ of the nut I8 ha a notch 68 cut into it as shown in Figures 5 and 6 and this notch allows the nut to pass over the bead 66.

The locking ring 65 has open ends and is held in position by friction. When it is desired to separate the shell and housing for inspection purposes the locking ring is moved to the position of Fig. 9 so that the bead 66 is between the open ends of the locking ring, in which position the housing may be slid off the shell. The remaining parts being the same as described in connection with Figs. 1, 2 and 3, it is thought no further description is necessary.

Changes in details of construction and arrangements of parts may be made by one skilled in the art and all such changes are to be considered as coming within the spirit of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A disconnect plug having in combination a shell, a freely rotatable nut mounted on said shell, means for preventing longitudinal movement of said nut, a housing having one end thereof embracing said shell at the end opposite that on which the nut is mounted, a shoulder in said housing abutting the end of said shell, positive means for preventing rotation and iongitudinal movement of the housing in relation to the shell, an insert carried by the shell, said insert being confined between a shoulder in said shell and the shoulder in said housing when the plug is assembled, and means permitting of longitudinal movement of the insert when the plug is disassembled but preventing rotation of the insert-in relation to the shell when the plug is assembled, said housing inclosing a chamber of substantial size between said insert and the closed end of the housing.

2. A disconnect plug having in combination a shell, a freely rotatable nut mounted on said shell, means for preventing longitudinal movement of said nut, a housing having one end thereof embracing said shell at the end opposite that on which the nut is mounted, a shoulder in said housing abutting the end of said shell, a removable locking ring for securing said shell and said housing together and preventing rotation and longitudinal movement of the housing in relation to the shell, an insert carried by the shell, said insert being confined between a shoulder in said shell and the shoulder in said housing when the plug is assembled, and means permitting of longitudinal movement of the insert when the plug is disassembled but preventing rotation of the insert in relation to the shell when the plug is assembled, said housing inclosing a chamber of substantial size between said insert and the closed end of the housing.

3. A disconnect plug having in combination a shell, a freely rotatable nut mounted on said shell, means for preventing longitudinal movement of said nut, a housing having one end thereof embracing said shell at the end opposite that on which the nut is mounted, a shoulder in said housing abutting the end of said shell, a removable locking ring, a toe on said ring for securing said shell and said housing together and preventing rotation and longitudinal movement of the housing in relation to the shell, an insert carried by the shell, said insert being confined between a shoulder in said shell and the shoulder in said housing when the plug is assembled, and means permitting of longitudinal movement of the insert when the plug is disassembled but preventing rotation of the insert in relation to the shell when the plug is assembled.

4. A disconnect plug having in combination a shell, a freely rotatable nut mounted on said shell, means for preventing longitudinal move ment of said nut, a housing having one end thereof embracing said shell at the end opposite that on which the nut is mounted, a shoulder in said housing abutting the end of said shell, a removable locking ring, a toe on said ring for securing said shell and said housing together and preventing rotation and longitudinal movement of the housing in relation to the shell, an annular groov in said housing for the reception of said locking ring, a notch intercepting said groove and into which said toe is entered, said notch permitting of the ready insertion of a suitable tool for removal of the locking ring, an insert carried by the shell, said insert being confined between a shoulder in said shell and the shoulder in said housing when the plug is assembled, and means permitting of longitudinal movement of the insert when the plug is disassembled but preventing rotation of the insert in relation to the shell when the plug is assembled.

ROSCOE I. MARKEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2443975 *Jan 18, 1943Jun 22, 1948Julius L MasonElectrical connector
US2454838 *Apr 24, 1943Nov 30, 1948Standard Telephones Cables LtdPlug assembly
US2613245 *Mar 3, 1950Oct 7, 1952Irenee BrouilletteWall mounted electric outlet
US2619515 *Dec 20, 1947Nov 25, 1952Leroy C DoaneVapor and explosion proof plug and receptacle
US2946035 *Feb 9, 1955Jul 19, 1960Ulrich TuchelCouplings for electric conductors
US3078436 *Sep 21, 1960Feb 19, 1963Crouse Hinds CoElectrical connector
US3116945 *Sep 15, 1960Jan 7, 1964Northern Ordnance IncCable retainer for electrical connectors
US3194588 *Nov 30, 1962Jul 13, 1965Mcdonnell Aircraft CorpKeyed connector for plugs and sockets having noninterchangeable coupling means
US3307138 *Mar 19, 1965Feb 28, 1967Edward SwartzWatertight repairable electric plug
US3445805 *May 18, 1967May 20, 1969Schlumberger Technology CorpElectrical connector
US4053201 *Feb 6, 1976Oct 11, 1977Societe Souriau Et CieElectric cable connection adapted for high external pressures
US4580865 *May 15, 1984Apr 8, 1986Thomas & Betts CorporationMulti-conductor cable connector
US5299951 *Aug 12, 1992Apr 5, 1994Ewald BlaetzHousing for an electrical connection
US5454728 *May 5, 1994Oct 3, 1995Jack; Shane R.Locking connector for an extension power cord
US9325124 *Jul 31, 2013Apr 26, 2016Boe Technology Group Co., Ltd.Photovoltaic connector
US20130206473 *Sep 20, 2011Aug 15, 2013Auto Kabel Managementgesellschaft MbhElectrical Connection System for an Energy Generation Device
US20140038456 *Jul 31, 2013Feb 6, 2014Beijing Boe Energy Technology Co., Ltd.Photovoltaic Connector
DE102014109270A1 *Jul 2, 2014Jan 21, 2016Lisa Dräxlmaier GmbHLeitungsfixierung und Verfahren zum Fixieren einer elektrischen Leitung an einem Stecker
EP0161910A2 *May 9, 1985Nov 21, 1985THOMAS & BETTS CORPORATION (a New Jersey Corporation)Multi-conductor cable connector
EP0161910A3 *May 9, 1985Nov 25, 1987THOMAS & BETTS CORPORATION (a New Jersey Corporation)Multi-conductor cable connector
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/320, 439/461, 285/918, 174/88.00R
International ClassificationH01R13/621
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/621, Y10S285/918
European ClassificationH01R13/621