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Publication numberUS2306851 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 29, 1942
Filing dateJun 3, 1938
Priority dateJun 3, 1938
Publication numberUS 2306851 A, US 2306851A, US-A-2306851, US2306851 A, US2306851A
InventorsLoyd A Ward
Original AssigneeTomkins Johnson Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydraulic riveting machine
US 2306851 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 29, 1942.

l.. A. WARD HYDRAULIC RIVETING MACHINE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 3. 1938 fly/j. 4

f2 .LDYDIA- WARE 5M es Dec. 29, 1942.

L A. WARD 'HYDRAULIC RIVETING MACHINE Filed June 3, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fg 1D Luyn A.'X/RD INVENTOR.

ICO

' ATroRNEY.

4 Sheets-Sheet 3 n.. A. WARD HYDRAULIC IARIVEVTING MACHINE Filed June 5. 1938 Dec. 29,

e 29, 1942- L. A; WARD HYDRAULIC RIVETING MACHINE 4 sheeis-sheet 4 Filed June 3, 1958 Lch/17 S/S/ARD Patented Dec. 29, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,306,851 HYDRAULIC RIVE'DING MACHINE Loyd A. Ward, Jackson,

Tomkins-Johnson Company, corporation of Michigan Mich., assignor to Jackson, Mich., a

9 Claims.

This invention relates to riveting machines and more particularly to riveting machines hydraulically actuated and designed for work on aluminum alloy constructions, such as in aircraft manufacture.

In the production riveting of aircraft structures and the like great uniformity and precision are essential. It has been found that these desiderata, together with speed of operation, can be obtained by the use of a riveting machine wherein the rivet is suspended beneath a downwardly facing anvil, to receive the work thereon prior to heading up, and providing an upwardly facing set which is hydraulically actuated to upset the rivet on the work. The present invention includes these features, and the structures disclosed are illustrative of ways in which the invention can be carried out.

An object of the invention is to provide a riveting machine having structure to support a rivet beneath a downwardly facing anvil, and an upwardly movable set to head up the rivet.

Another object of the invention is to arrange the rivet supporting structure for movement away from its supporting position between the anvil and the set after the rivet has been received in the work.

A further object of the invention is to provide means for disposing a rivet in operative relation to a flat riveting surface and to remove the disposing means when the rivet is suitably supported in the work.

A still further object of the invention is to provide rivet supporting means movable from one station to another to receive a rivet.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a work support to hold work against the riveting anvil.

These and other objects will be apparent from the following specification when taken with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a broken vertical section-of one form of the invention,

Fig. 2 is a section on the line II-II of Fig. l,

Fig. 3 is a View taken on the line III-III of Fig. 2,

Fig. 4 is a detailed view of the rivet support, from which selected rivets are picked up by the rivet carrier,

Fig. 5 is a partial vertical section of another form of the invention,

Fig. 6 is a side view ofthe structure shown in Fig. 5,

Fig. 7 is an elevation and partial vertical section of the anvil and anvil actuating mechanism of the structure disclosed in Figs. 5 and 6,

Fig. 8 is a partial vertical section of still another form of the invention, Y

Fig. 9 is a partial side view of the structure shown in Fig. 8 partly broken away to show details, and i Fig. 10 is a partial vertical section of the structure disclosed in Fig. 8 showing, in addition, the control apparatus.

Referring particularly to Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the drawings, there is disclosed one form of the invention wherein the rivet is moved under a flat anvil I by a resilient cantilever leaf spring rivet carrier 2. The anvil I is downwardly Vfacing and has a relatively expansive surface 3, which is flat and arranged to be disposed next to the out- 4side of the work so that when the riveting is completed, a smooth, stream-lined surface will be provided, unbroken by usual projecting rivet heads. The anvil I is fxedly mounted in a vframe 5.

The cantilever leaf spring rivet carrier 2 is actuated laterally by a piston 5 in a cylinder 'I through a piston rod 8 connected with the piston 6 and projecting from one end of the cylinder 'l through a packing 9. The portion of the piston rod 8 outside of the cylinder 1 is connected to a member I0 by a screw II. The member I0 is in turn connected to a plate I2 by a screw I3. The plate I2 is slidably disposed on the top of a plate I4, which is a part of the frame 5. Depending from the plate I2 through a slot l5 in the plate I4 is a carriage I5, to which is secured by screws I1 the rivet carrier 2. The slot I5 serves as a guide for the carriage I6, so that When the piston 6 is reciprocated in the cylinder l the carriage I6 is reciprocated in the slot I5.

It will be observed that the frame 5 has a curved portion 20 and that the cantilever leaf spring rivet carrier 2 has an initial set. Said set, when the carriage I6 is in retracted position, as disclosed in dotted outline in Fig. 1, is such that the cantilever leaf spring rivet carrier 2 is disposed resiliently pressed against the lower side of the rivet supporting member 2|, with the forked end with which it is provided straddling a rivet therein. As the carriage is advanced toward its full line position, as shown in Fig. 1, the rivet carrier 2 pushes a rivet from the rivet supporting member 2|, out through the slot 22 therein, and along the curved surface 20 until it is disposed beneath and against the anvil 3, as shown in Fig. 1.

The selecting mechanism f or disposing rivets one at a time in the rivet supporting member 2| is essentially that disclosed in the copending application of Loyd A. Ward et al., Serial No. 192,946, led February 28, 1938. The selecting mechanism is disclosed particularly in Figs. 2, 3 and 4 and comprises a selector or shuttle 23 having communicating therewith a chute 24, into which rivets are fed either manually or from a hopper. The actuation of the shuttle or selector 23 is such that each time it is moved to the right, as shown in Fig. 3, a single rivet from v the chute 24 is selected and dropped down the chute 25 to the rivet supporting-member 2| and at one end of the outlet slot 22. Reciprocating movement is given to the selector 23 as follows: A rod 26 is slidably mounted in a frame portion 2'1. Disposed on the rod 26 are adjustable stops 28 and 29, between which is arranged vto slide a projection 3i! from the member I9 connected to the piston rod 8, as disclosed in Figs. 1 and 3. lAlso disposed onthe rod 26 are stops 3| and32 adjacenteach end of the selector l23, so that as the rcd 26 4is reciprocated, the selector 23 also reciprocates. 'I'he position ofthe stops 28 and 2'9 is such thatas the piston rod 8 reciprocates to reciprocate the lcarri-age I6 and the rivet carrier 2, it also reciprocates, through the projection 258, the rod 26,'and thus the selector 23, by alternately abutting against the stops 28 and 29. Thus, as the rivet carrier 2 is withdrawn to its retracted'posit-ion, as shown in dotted outline in @Fig-1, alrivet is selected from the chute 24 by the selector '23a-nd passes down the chute 25 to position in the rivet supporting member 2| to be picked up by theforked end'of the rivet carrier upper endof a hydraulic vpiston red 35 actuated by'a hydraulic piston 31 disposed in a cylinder 38. The piston rod is guided for reciprocat-ion in a tube 39. Cooperating with the set 35 isa-conventional stripper 40 resiliently urged by a spring- 4|.

WIntlie operation of the riveting machine, work 42, showninfbroken line inFig. 1, is disposed on a work rest, comprising posts 43 projecting from 2a-p1fatfor`m^44 mounted on La sleeve 45 slidable on ythe outside of the tube i39. `43 have been illustrated, it is contemplated that -asinany or few posts may be used as desired. Y-Slidable on the youtside ofthe sleeve 45 is a collar '46having pivoted theretol a clevis `41. The -clevis 4'| Ais connected by a rod 48 to another 'clevis 49, which is in turn pivoted to a foot pedal `5(i pivoted 'to a bracket 5| mounted on the base 52. YDisposed about the sleeve 45 and between Vthe platform 44 and vthe collar 48 is a helical -springf53- Vertical movement is given to the -collar 46 and through the spring 53 to the platform `44 and the work supporting posts 43 by actuation of the foot pedal 50.

Work A42 disposed on the Ywork supporting fpo'sts'43 -isprovided with a rivet receiving hole 55, 'which -is countersunk to receive the head of the rivet. The foot pedal 5!) is moved suiciently tolightly urge'the work 42 against the rivet held inthe rivet carrier V2 and backed up by the anvil 3. The work 42 is then moved until the rivet is disposed `in the hole '55. At this point of the operation, continued movement of the foot pedal A'Ell-urges'the work 42 up against the anvil 3. As the work moves toward the anvil 3, it strikes a While only two posts draw the rivet carrier 2 to the position shown in dotted outline in Fig. 1.

The mechanism for withdrawing the rivet carrier 2 comprises, in conjunction with the nger 59, a pressure releasing valve 60 having an actuating button 6| and a conduit 62, providing a communication with the distributing valve 63. The distributing valve 53 is similar to the distributing valfve disclosed vin the copending application of Harold A. Tomkins et al., Serial No. 85.106, i'lled June 19, 1936, now Patent No. 2,132,811.

The d-i-s'tributing valve 63 comprises a body, within which is reciprocable a piston 84 having ends E5 'and '66. Between the ends 65 and 56 is a space Y51, which comprises a distributing port. 'I he end G6 is provided with a reduced extension y98 of less cross-sectional area than the crosssectional area of the end 65. An inlet supply port 89 and outlet ports 'i0 and 'ii both project through the body of the distributing valve 63. At the end of the body adjacent theuend 65 is a chamber l2, which is larger in cross-sectional area than the cross-sectional area of a chamber i3 provided adjacent the reduced extension 68. A leakage port 'i4 provides a communication between the space 6? and the chamber l2, and a leakage port 'F5 provides a communication between the space 61 and the chamber 73. It will be observed that the conduit 62 from the pressure releasing valve 6|) communicates with the chamber 12. v

As shown in Fig. 1, the inlet port 69 is connected by the space 61 with the outlet port which is in turn communicating with a conduit communicating with the right end of the cylinder 1. Thus, compressed air from the inlet port 69 is directed into the cylinder `and is holding the piston 6 against the left end of the cylinder When the work=`42 strikes against the finger 59, the finger 59, being slidably mounted on the body 5, presses on the button 6| t0 exhaust compressed air through the conduit 62 from the chamber 72. The' result is that the full pressure in the chamber 'i3 moves the piston 64 to the left end of the body of the distributing valve 63. Compressed air from the inlet port 69 is then directed by the vspace B1 into the outlet port 19, vwhich communi- Cates with a conduit 8| connected to the left end of the cylinder 1. The result is that the piston 6 is moved tothe right, as viewed in Fig, 1, through the piston rod 8, the member l0, the plate i2, and the carriage I8. The rivet carrier 2 is moved to the dotted line position, as shown in Fig. l.

It will be observed that the rivet carrier 2 is withdrawn as the work 42 is moved toward the anvil 3. When the rivet carrier 2 has been withdrawn, the work'42 is Vclamped against the anvil 3 through the action of the pedal 50 and the spring 53. The work 42 and rivet are now ready for heading up. A foot peda18'2 connected by a rod 83 to a conventional hydraulic `distributing valve 84 is actuated. The connections between the distributing valve-84 and the cylinder 38 are such that when the pedal 82 is actuated, hyjdraulic i'luid under pressure is conducted from a source of the port 85 on the cylinder 38. The piston 3l is then moved upwardly to urge the set against the rivet to upset the same, and hydraulic fluid is exhausted from above the piston 3'! through the port 85. The conventional hydraulic distributing valve 84 is of the character wherein when a predetermined pressure has been reached, the hydraulic iiuid 'under pressure from the source is conducted to the port 86, and the .port 85 is connected with an exhaust, to lower ,the piston 31, and thus the set 35, to its original starting position. .When the set 35 is lowered, the work 42 is lowered bythe operator removing pressure from ,the pedal 59, thereby permitting the linger 59 and the push button 6| to move downwardly to close the exhaust valve 69. Then, since the area on the piston end 68 is less than the area of the piston end 65, the piston 64 is moved tothe position shown in Fig. l, thereby cutting off the supply of compressed air from the inlet port 99 to the port 'I9 and conduit 8| and directing compressed air from the inlet port 69 to the port 1| and conduit 39 to return the piston 5 toV the position shown in Fig. 1 at the left end of the cylinder l, `and thus to cause the rivet carrier 2 to pick up a rivet from the rivet support 2| and to present it, as shown, beneath the anvil 3. It` will be understood that when the piston 64 is moved to cover the port 19, exhaust air will be exhausted from vthe cylinder l', through the'conduit 8|, through the exhaust passage 81 in the surface ,of the piston end 65, and out of the exhaust port `|38 in the body of the distributing valve 63. In-a like manner air is exhausted from the cylinder 'l when the piston 94 moves to the opposite end of its stroke, through the exhaust channel 89 corresponding to the exhaust channel 8l and the exhaust port 99 corresponding to the exhaust port 88, al1 in the manner disclosed in the aforesaid copending application of Harold A. Tomkins et. al., Serial No. 86,106, filed June 19, 1936, now Patent No. 2,132,811.

The form of the invention just described is particularly desirable wherein it is a requirement that the exterior surface of the riveted structure be smooth and free from projecting lrivet heads.

anvil surface 3 and the countersunk work 42 for receiving a rivet head adjacent the anvil 3 will leave a nished riveted surface smooth and lstream-lined in every respect.

V Another form of the invention is disclosed in -Figs. 5, 6, and 7. In this form of the invention the work to be riveted is manipulated to dispose a-rivet held in clamping jaws 95 in a rivet hole in the work. `The jaws 95 are of the character disclosed in my copending application, Serial No. 101,210, filed lSeptember 17, 1936, and are mountyed on depending cantilever leaf springs 99 secured on opposite sides of a block 91 slidable in a vertical passageway 98. The jaws 95, the cantilever leaf springs 96 and the block 91 are arranged -to move upwardly and to be spread by the anvil 99 when the set |99 is moved upwardly to upset vthe rivet. The jaws 95 are thus moved completely out of position between the anvil 99 and the set |99. Movement'of the set |99 is accomplished by a hydraulic piston |9| acting against a piston rod l|92 connected to the set |99, I'he piston |9| reciprocates in a cylinder |93 under the control of a hydraulic distributing valve |94, which is actuated by a foot pedal |95. The valve |94 is similar to the valve 84 disclosed in Fig. 1 and is arranged to conduct hydraulic fluid under pressure from a source |96 through a conduit |91 into the cylinder |93 beneath the piston |9| to move vthe piston rod |92 and thus the set |99 upwardly. At the same time, exhaust hydraulic uid from the cylinder |93 above the piston |9| is exhausted through the conduit |98, the valve |94 and the .putlet |99. When a predetermined pressure has It will be clear that the broad been reached, the valve |94 automatically acts ,t'o admit hydraulic fluid from the source |96 to the conduit |98 into the cylinder |93 above the piston |9| to withdraw the set |99. Atthe same time fluid is exhausted from the lower side of the cylinder |93 to the conduit |9`| and the outlet |99 of the valve |94.

The valve |94 is also provided with a compressed air distributing valve H9, conventional in structure and arranged to conduct air from a compressed air source ||2 through the conduit ||3 to the upper end of a cylinder |l4, in which is disposed a piston ||5 having connected thereto a piston rod H9. nected to the lower end thereof a yoke Il, to the ends of which are connected rods ||8 and ||9.

VThe function of the piston ||5, and the rods |18 and H9 which it controls, is for moving the rivet clamping jaws 95 downwardly into rivet clampingposition and to prepare the jaws 95 for receiving another rivet forthe next riveting operation. The rod ||9 is movable vertically in the vertical passageway'98 and is arranged to engage with the top of the block 91 to force the same downwardly, thereby forcing the jaws 95 downwardly olil the anvil 99, on the opposite sides .of which they have been forced by the upcoming work pushed by the set |99. It will be clear that when the jaws are disposed on opposite sides of the anvil 99, they are spread apart and resiliently urged against the sides of the anvil 99 by the leaf springs 96. In order to keep the jaws 95 spread apart after they have moved to their lower position so that a new rivet may be disposed therebetween, a wedge |29 at the lower end of the rod ||9 is arranged to move between the jaws 95 while they are still spread apart by the anvil 99. It will thus be clear that the normal distance between the top of the jaws 95 and the bottom of the wedge |29 is less than the distance between the bottom of the rod ||8 and the top ofthe block 9|. Thus, by the time the rod |18 strikes thetop of the block 91, the wedge |29 will already have moved into position between the jaws 95 to hold them apart. The valve ||9 is arranged to operate in such manner that as the valve |94 reverses the movement of the piston |9| to move it downwardly, compressed air is admitted through the valve i9 and the conduit ||3 to the cylinder ||4 to lower the piston I5 with the results described. By the time the piston |9| reaches the bottom of its stroke, the distributing valve I|9 automatically operates to disconnect vthe inlet |12 from the conduit ||3 and to connect the conduit ||3 to the exhaust B2i to exhaust compressed air from the cylinder H5. The result is that the spring |22, bearing against the piston l5 and the lower end of the cylinder H4, resiliently urges the piston ||4, and together with it the piston rod H5, the lyoke and the rods ||9 and H9, into their upper positions. However, in `the meantime, selecting mechanism |25 has been actuated to dispose a new rivet between the jaws 95, so that as the "rod ||9 is raised from between the jaws 95, the new rivet is clamped therebetween and is ready to receive the work thereover.

The rivet selecting mechanism |25 comprises a transversely movable shuttle or selector |29 of the character described in the copending application of Loyd A. Ward et al., Serial No. 192,946, led February 28, 1938. The selector |28 is associated with a chute |21 and is moved laterally to `4select au rivet from the chute `|2`|` and to let it fall The piston rod IE6 has conby gravity -down Vthe chute |528 to position itbe .tween the jaws 95.

The mechanism for laterally reciprocating the .selector |26 comprises .a lever |30 oscillatable .about a pivot |3| and yieldingly urged upwardly by .a spring |32. The lever'ISll `hasconnected thereto a leaf spring |33, which is in operative engagement with a horizontally slidable'member |34 reciprocable horizontally as the lever |35 is oscillated about the pin |3|. The opposite .end -ofthemember .|34 is provided .with an outwardly :extending cantilever leaf spring |35 disposed .in a slot |35 in the selector |25. The lever |38 .is -oscillated about the pin |3| by a shoulder |l31 .comprising a portion of the rod H9. .the rod H8 moves .downwardly under the action .of the piston I5and the piston rod H5, the lever |35 is oscillated downwardly against the action of thespring |32 to .move the leaf spring |33 to lat- .erally move the member |84, which, through the leaf spring |35, laterally moves the selector |26 to select a single rivet from the chute |21 to let it .fall vby gravity into the chute |28. It will be understood that as the piston I5 moves upwardily to move the rod `I I9 upwardly `to remove the Thus, as f e The Vwork is moved over the rivet held between .the jaws 95. The operator then moves down the footy pedal |05, which admits hydraulic uid to the cylinder |03 to move the piston |0| upwardly to upset the rivet by means of the set |80. The set |05 has operatively associated with it a conventional stripper |38. As the .set |80 moves the work upwardly, the jaws 95 are spread over .the anvil 89 .until they are out of `position between the anvil 69 and the set |00. When a predetermined pressure has .been reached, the hydraulically vcontrolled valve |04 automatically acts to return the piston II to its lower or starting position. At the same time the compressed air distributing valve H admits compressed air .through the conduit H3 tothe top of the cylinder H4 to move the piston H5, and together with it the rods I |8 and H9, downwardly. The downward movement ofthe rod`K H9 disposes the wedge |28 .between the jaws 95 to maintain them spread apart while .the `rod I I8 abuts against the top of the block 91 to move the jaws 95 down into starting position. Asthe rod H moves downwardly, the shoulder |311;

thereon actuates the selecting mechanism through the .lever to move the selector |26 to dispose a rivet from the chute |21 into positionbetween the jaws 95. At the time the piston |8| reaches its lowermost position, the com- 5.60

pressed air distributing valve ||0 acts to automatically exhaust the compressed air from the top of the cylinder H4 to permit the springl |22 to move the piston H5, and thus the piston rod H6, and the rods H8 and H9, upwardly to per- .movement of the ram |48.

`mounted Aon y.cantilever leaf springs |146, connected .to a slidingl block 5.141. `Mounted, for movement relatively ato .the jaws |45 isa .ram |48v in lwhich is mounted an anvil |49. The .anvil |49 andthe ram |48 are arranged for relative movement by structure illustrated-in :my copending application, Serial No. 101,210, filedSeptember '17, 1936. The relativemovement of thejaws |45and vthe anvil |49 is such that when the jaws are in their lowered position, las determined by the stop |50 Yunder the control of `the adjusting screw |-5|, as .disclosed in my aforesaid copending application, the `anvil |49 is in the position disclosed in-Fig. 9, that is, adjacent the bottom of the jaws |45, backing up the rivetwhile it is clamped laterally by the jaws |45. When the jaws |45 -are in their upper position, as shown in dotted loutline in Fig. 9, theanvil |49 is `in `the position shown, that is, above .the jaws |45 tovpermit Ia. rivetselected bythe selector |52 from the chute v|153 to slide down the chute |54 to drop into t-he 'top-'of -the ljaws |45. Then, Aas the anvil |49 -movesdownwardly under the action of theram 448, the rivet betweenthejaws |45 is forced the Work has been placed over the rivet, the

anvil Vmoves upwardly under the action of a piston, such as thefpiston 31 `disclosed in Fig. l, or I0| Ydisclosed in Fig. 1. The anvil |56 has associated therewith a suitable stripper |51.

`As the-anvil |56 and the stripper |51 move upwardly, the work bearing against the jaws |45 spreads them over the anvil |49 to move them lout of the way. The rivet is'then headed up in the usual manner.

It is preferred that'the movement of the `anvil |56 lbe under the `control of an automatic hydraulic distributing valve, 'such as the valve 84 in Fig. 1, which returns the 'anvil |56 `to its startingposition when a predetermined pressure has been reached. Also, the anvil |56 may .be

associated, if desired, with a work support such asis disclosed in Fig. l.

The rivet selector^|52 is actuated upon the The structure for actuating the selector |52 may be that disclosed Ain Figs. Band' 6 or may be under the control of the piston rod |50, employed in a manner to be described, for reciprocating the ram |48. The operative connection between the piston rod |60 and the selector |52 maybe that disclosed ,particularly in Fig. 3 hereof in the form of the projection v3|) of the member I0.

The mechanism for 4reciprocating the ram |48 is disclosed rparticularly in Figs. 8 and l0 and comprises avtoggle consisting of a link |6| and a bell crank lever |62 connected by va pivot |53 to the piston rod |60. The piston rod |50 is actuated by a piston |64 in a cylinder |65. The cylinder |55 is pivoted at one end by a pivot |66 to the frame |51 4and oscillates about the pivot `|66 Aas the piston |64 moves from .one end of the cylinder |65 t0 the other. Movement of the piston |64, and't'hus the toggle comprising the `members Iiy and |62 and the ram |48, to which the"toggle=is-pivoted^-by a pinV |68, isA under the control of an air distributing valve |10, which is substantially identical with the distributing valve 63 disclosed in Fig. 1. Operation of the distributing valve |10 is under the control of a push button exhaust valve |1|. A conduit |12 connects the exhausting valve |1| with the chamber |13 of the distributing valve |10. When the push button valve |1| is opened, the distributing piston |14 of the distributing valve |10 moves to the left, as viewed in Fig. 10, to conduct compressed air from a source |15 through the distributing chamber |16, through the conduit |11 to the left end of the cylinder |65 to drive the piston |64 to the right and thus through the toggle raise the ram |48. As the ram |48 is raised, the jaws |45 move upwardly under the action'of the rod |18, whichis connected to the ram |48 in a manner disclosed in my aforesaid copending application Serial No. 101,210, led September 17, 1936. At the same time the selector |52 is actuated to deposit a rivet from the chute |53 in the top of the jaws |45, as disclosed in dotted outline in Fig. 9. Release of pressure on the push button valve |1| results in the distributing piston |14 moving to the right due to the differential pressure areas at the ends of the piston |14 in the chamber |13 and. the chamber |19. Compressed air is then conducted from the source |15, through the distributing chamber |16, through the conduit |80 to the right end of l.

the cylinder' |65, to drive the piston |64 to the left and to move the ram |48 downwardly. The exhaust ports |8| and |82 of the distributing valve |10 are provided with petcocks |83 and |84,

which may restrict or open the exhaust passage u to control the speed of movement of the piston |64 in a known and conventional manner. The reason for controlling this speed is to control the speed of movement of the anvil, so as to allow suicient time for a rivet from the chute |53 to be depositedin the jaws |45 through the action of the selector |52, while the ram |48 is moving up and down automatically.

In operation, starting with the apparatus in the position disclosed in Fig. 9, the work is disposed over the rivet. The set |56 is then moved upwardly to upset the rivet, the set |56 automatically returning to its starting position under the control of an automatic valve, as set forth.

The push button exhaust valve |1| is then actuated to raise the ram |40 and the set |49, together with the jaws |45 as described, and a rivet from the chute |53 is deposited in the jaws |45. The set |49 and ram |48 are automatically returned t0 the position shown in Fig. 9 to pre- ,f

sent the rivet received from the chute |53 to receive the work for the next operative step of the machine.

From the foregoing description it will be clear that the present invention is not limited to a single form of structure but that it may take numerous forms, a number of which have been described in detail. It will be further understood that where automatic and semi-automatic controls have been used, other controls of a like nature performing equivalent functions may be used if desired. While it has been hereinabove set forth that the present invention is particularly adaptable for use on aluminum alloy constructions and in aircraft manufacture, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to any of these uses.

Having thus described my invention, what I desire to secure by Letters Patent and claim is:

1. In a riveting machine, a downwardly facing anvil, means for supporting a rivet, a selector for depositing at predetermined times a rivet on said support, a rivet carrier movable in a fixed path, means for actuating said selector to deposit a rivet on said support and in a position having a portion extending into the path of movement of said carrier, and means to move said carrier past said support and into co-operative engagement with the projecting portion of a rivet on said support to pick up and remove said rivet from said support as it moves thereby and to carry said rivet into operative relation to said anvil, an upwardly facing set, and means to move said set upwardly to upset the rivet against said anvil.

2. In a riveting machine, a downwardly facing anvil, means for supporting a rivet, a selector for depositing at predetermined times a rivet on said support, a rivet carrier, a cylinder, a pist0n disposed in said cylinder and reciprocable therein under the control of a movable part of the machine for automatic operation, means connected t0 said piston for actuating said selector and said carrier, said carrier being actuated on one stroke of the piston to pick up a rivet from said support and to dispose the same in operative relation to said anvil, and during the other stroke thereof to withdraw said carrier to its starting position, an upwardly facing set, and means to move said set upwardly to upset 'the rivet against said anvil.

3. In a riveting machine, a downwardly facing anvil, means for supporting a rivet, a carriage1 a cantilever leaf spring secured to said carriage, said leaf spring having rivet supporting means on the free end thereof, means to actuate said carriage to move said cantilever leaf spring into engagement with the rivet on said supporting means to pick up said rivet and to dispose the same in operative relation to said anvil, anv upwardly facing set, and means to move said set upwardly to upset the rivet against said anvil.

4. In a riveting machine, a downwardly facing anvil, means for supporting a rivet, a carriage, a cantilever leaf spring secured to said carriage,

ksaid cantilever leaf spring having rivet supporting means on the free end thereof and also being provided with a predetermined set, said carriage being reciprocable in a horizontal plane above the horizontal plane of the operative surface of said anvil, said machine having a surface coincident with the horizontal plane of the operative surface 0f said anvil, and continuing in a curved path into substantial coincidence with the plane of the path of movement of said carriage, said predetermined set of said cantilever leaf spring urging the same against said surface, means to actuate said carriage to move said cantilever leaf spring to pick up a rivet from said rivet support and move the same along said surface until it is disposed beneath and against said anvil, an upwardly facing set, and means to move said set upwardly to upset the rivet against said anvil.

5. In a riveting machine, an anvil, means for supporting a rivet, a selector for depositing atr predetermined times a rivet on said support, a carriage, a cantilever leaf spring secured to said carriage, said cantilever leaf spring having rivet supporting means on the free end thereof and also being provided with a predetermined set, said carriage being reciprocable in a horizontal plane back of the horizontal plane of the operative surface of said anvil, said machine having a surface coincident with the horizontal plane ofV the operative surface of said anvil and continuing in a curved path into a substantial coincidence with the plane of the path of movement of said carriage, said predetermined set of said cantilever leaf spring urging the same toward said surface, means to actuate said selector to deposit a rivet on said rivet supporting means and to move said carriage to move said cantilever leaf spring to pick up a rivet from said rivet support and move the same along said surface until it is disposed in operative relation to said anvil, a set, and means to move said set to upset the rivet against said anvil.

6. In a rivetngmachine, a downwardly facing anvil, means for supporting a rivet, a laterally movable rivet carrier movable in a fixed path, a rivet held by said support having a portion projecting into the path of said carrier, means to move said carrier past said supporting means into co-operative engagement with the projecting portion of a supported rivet to pick up said rivet from said supporting means as it moves by the same and to carry said rivet into operative relation to said anvil, an upwardly facing set, a

work support associated with said set, means to move said work support upwardly independently of said set to dispose work on said rivet, and means to move said set upwardly to upset the rivet against said anvil.

7. In a riveting machine, an anvil, means for supporting a rivet, a reoipiocable carriage, a cantilever leaf spring. secured to said carriage, said cantilever leaf spring having rivet supporting means on the free end thereof and also being provided with a predetermined set, said carriage being reciprocable in a plane inwardly of and parallel to the plane of the operative surface of said anvil, said machine having a surface coincident with the plane of the operative surface of said anvil and continuing in la curved path to substantial coincidence with the plane parallel to and adjacent the plane of' reciprocation of said carriage, said rivet supporting means being adjacent said last named plane, said predetermined set of said cantilever leaf spring urging the same toward said surface, and means to move said cantilever leaf spring to pick up a rivet from said rivet support and move the same along said surface until it is disposed in operative relationvto said anvil, aset, and meansrto move said set to upset the rivet against said anvil.

8. In a riveting machine, a downwardly facing anvil, means movable from a position at one side of said anvil into a position for supporting a rivet in operative relation to said anvil for receiving work thereon, mechanism for moving said supporting means, controlling means for said mechanism, an upwardly facing set, said supporting means in rivet supporting position being between said anvil and said set, means controlled by the movement of the work when being moved into operative relation with the rivet supported by said supporting means for actuating said con-y trolling means for actuating said mechanism for laterally withdrawing said supporting means from between said anvil and said set when the rivet is received in thel work, and means for moving said set upwardly to upset the rivet against said;

anvil.

' 9. In a riveting machine, a downwardly facing' LOYD A. WARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2620876 *Jul 1, 1946Dec 9, 1952Lockheed Aircraft CorpAutomatic riveting machine
US2687233 *Jan 15, 1949Aug 24, 1954Tomkins Johnson CompanyRivet transfer slide mechanism
US3125905 *Sep 28, 1961Mar 24, 1964 Stein
US4027370 *Oct 21, 1976Jun 7, 1977Branson Ultrasonics CorporationHigh frequency vibration insertion apparatus
US4044462 *Oct 26, 1976Aug 30, 1977General-Electro Mechanical CorporationRivet blank feeder for riveting apparatus
US4074846 *Dec 24, 1975Feb 21, 1978Hammond CorporationFloating eyelet inserting tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/62
International ClassificationB21J15/20
Cooperative ClassificationB21J15/20, B21J15/10
European ClassificationB21J15/20, B21J15/10