Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2307600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1943
Filing dateJul 6, 1938
Publication numberUS 2307600 A, US 2307600A, US-A-2307600, US2307600 A, US2307600A
InventorsMartin Hedmark
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heating system
US 2307600 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Janf5, 1943. c. G. MUNTERs Erm.

HEATING SYSTEM Filed July 6, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet l Mw BY tijk/4.161TORNY.

Jan. 5, 1943. c. G. MUNTERs ETAL HEATING SYSTEM Filed July 6, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN o' Patented Jan. 5, 1943 A UNITED 2,301,600 HEA'rmG SYSTEM Carl Georg Munter and Martin Hedmark, Stockholm, Sweden Application July 6, 1938, Serial No. 217,698 In Sweden July 17, 1937 9 Claims.

Our invention relates to heating systems for' buildings, and more particularly to an improved iiue or chimney forming part of such heating systems.

Heretofore it has been the practice to construct the ue or chimney Aof massive masonry.'

The thick walls of the chimney were necessary in order to provide sucient heat insulation and the chimney necessarily had a large heat accumulating capacity, and the heat absorbed was lost* to a great extent.

In accordance with our invention the iiue is constructed of a number of metallic 'pipe sections of convenient length. Each section is surrounded by a Water jacket in the form of a shell welded or otherwise suitably secured to the section or conduit forming'the iiue. Jackets on adjacent sections are connected together by means of one or more pipes which are preferably made of flexible material such as copper, to thereby permit a slight relative movement which results from expansion and contraction due to temperature changes. The Water heated in these jackets may be utilized to heat the building and thus, in accordance with our invention, not only is the size of the chimney reduced, but the heat absorbedv thereby is utilized.

A further advantage of our invention is that the ue may-be installed after the building has been erected.

Further objects and advantages of our invention will be apparent from the following description considered in connection with the accompanying drawings which form a part of this specification and of which:

Fig. 1 is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of our invention;

Figs. 2, 3 and 4 are cross-sectional views on a larger scale showing portions of the device illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of our invention and is taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional view` taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a cross-sectional View on an enlarged scale of a portion of the device shown in Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 9--9 of Fig. 6.

Referring more particularly to Figs. l through 4, reference character l0 designates generally a building having a cellar II, a first story I2, a second story I3 and an attic I4 covered by a roof I5. Located in the cellar II is a furnace,

'designated generally by reference character I8.

Furnace I6 includes an inner shell Il defining a combustion chamber and an outer shell I8 form'- ing a water jacket around the furnace. A conduit I9 communicates with the combustion chamber and extends through the water jacket to the exterior of the shell I8.

Connected together and to the conduit I9 is a plurality of nue sections designated generally by reference characters 20 and 20a. Each of these sections includes an inner conduit 2| to which is secured a jacket 22. The ends of the conduits 2| extend beyond the jackets 22 in order to provide means for coupling the adjacent sections together. Section 20a differs from the sections 20 in that the jacket 22a is of greater diameter than the jackets 22 and the pipe coil 23 is disposed -within the annular space formed within the jacket 22a. As will be clear from Figs. 2, 3 or 4, the lower ends of the conduits ZI are formed with bell mouths 24 of a diameter suitable to receive the upper ends of adjacent conduits 2|, or the upper end of conduit I9. In the places where the sections extend through the floors 25 of the building they are supported by means of brackets 26, welded or otherwise suitably secured to the outside ofjjackets 22. Thus, most of the sections are independently supported and expansion and contraction thereof due to changes in temperature is made possible by a slight slippage 'of the conduits 2I within the bell mouths 24. Adjacent water jackets are connected together by means of one or more conduits 21, each conduit being preferably providedwith a valve 28. These conduits are made of a flexible material such as copper in order to permit the aforesaid expansion and contraction of the flue sections.

On the rst floor of the building there is shown a cooking stove 3B connected to the iiue by means of avconduit 3I passing through the jacket 22a.

A damper 32 is located in the flue just below the point of connection of conduit 3|.

The upper end of coil 23 is connected to a water supply pipe 33 and the lower end of the coil is connected to a pipe 34 which supplies hot water for use in the building.

The upper end of the uppermost section 24, which terminates within the attic I4. is connected Y to a double Walled conduit 35 which extends through the roof. The space between the walls of this conduit may be lled with any suitable heating insulating material, but a small amount of insulation is suflcient due to the fact that the ilue gases at this point have a comparatively low temperature.

A conduit 38 is connected to the upper part of the uppermost jacket 23 and leads to one or more hot water radiators 31 located in the building. An expansion tank 38 is connected to conduit 38 and is provided with overflow conduit 33 extending through the roof I5. Valves 40 are provided between conduit 36 and the inlets of the radiators 31. Conduit II connects the outlets of the radiators with the lower part of the jacket I8 s urrounding the furnace. A conduit 42 provided with a valve 43 connects the lower part of conduit 36 with the jacket 22a. The lower end of conduit 38 is connected to return lconduit 4I through a valve M.

The operation of the above described device is as follows:

The products of combustion formed in the furnace I6 pass through the conduit I3 and the conduit 2l of the different sections 28 and 20a and are discharged to the atmosphere through the conduit 35, which extends through the roof. The jacket I8 around the furnace and the jackets 22 and 22a forming part of the ue sections 28 and 28a are filled with water, the valve 28 in the conduits 21 between the jackets being open. This water is thus heated by the flue gases and tends to rise due to the lowering of its specific gravity. The heated water passes through the conduit 38 and through any of the radiators 31 the valves 48 of which are open. From the radiators the Water passes through the return conduit 4I to the jacket I8, where it is again heated and ascends through this jacket and through the jackets and 28a. In the event that all of the valves l0 are closed, thermal circulation through the jackets and the conduit 36 may nevertheless take place due to the fact that valve Il is open,

thus connecting conduit 36 with return conduit 4I.

The products of combustion produced in stove pass through conduit 3I to the ilue. The water passing through the coil 23 is thus heated by the products of combustion from both the furnace and the stove. It will be noted that the Water passing through coil 23 ilows counter-current to the -ue gases within the flue. y As previously stated, the water heated in coil 23 constitutes the hot water supply for the building.

In. the event that it is not desired to use the furnace, as in the summertime, the valves 28 in the conduit connecting the jacket 22a. with the jacket 22 immediately therebelow are closed, as is the valve 44, and the valves of the radiators. If desired,` the jackets I8 of the furnace and the jacket 22 immediately thereabove may be drained.

Under these conditions, the coil 23 is heated` solely by the flue gases discharged from the stove 30. Valve 43 is open'and thus thermo circulation may take place upwardly through the jackets 20a and 28 and downwardly through the conduits 36 and 42.

Hence, under all conditions, the conduits 2I which convey the hot ilue gases are surrounded by a circulating layer of water which prevents the transmission of excessive amounts of h eat to the building. Inasmuch as a circulating layer aaomoo` rounded by a conduit 80 of. suitable material, such as sheet metal or ilber board, forming an annular passage 8| around the jackets 22 and 22a. 'I'he upper end of passageway 8| is connected to a space 83 formed between conical plates 84 and 88. Pipes 88 lead from the space 83 and open into the upper parts of the rooms on the second story of the building,l preferably in the neighborhood of the windows. A return 'air duct 81 communicates with the lower parts of these rooms and extends downwardly to an air chamber 88 in heat exchange Arelationship with the stove or furnace 83. This air chamber is connected to the lower end of the passage 8| surrounding the ilue sections. 'I'he rooms on the lower door of the house are heated by air conducted through passages 88, which are branched oit from the passage 5I, to the upper parts of therooms. Return ducts 8I lead from the lower parts of these rooms to the chamber 58. A certain percentage of fresh air from outside the building is supplied through the duct 62.

As shown in Fig. 9 the passage 5I may be divided into a plurality of passages by means of partitions 83 whereby the air circulated to and vfrom the diil'erent rooms may be kept separate.

For this purpose, the chamber 58 which is in heat exchange relation with the furnace or stove 83 may likewise be divided into a plurality of passages by means of partitions 84. As shown in Fig. 6, one o1' the passages defined by partition 63 may be in communication with the lower part of a room through an opening 85 and with the upper part of the same room by an opening 88, the air heated within the passage rising and passing through the opening 88 into the room, where it is cooled and falls to the lower part, of the room and then enters the passage through the opening 65. If desired, fins, corrugations or other means for increasing the surface of the water jackets may be employed, as is shown at 61 in Fig. 9.

1 or less specic embodiments of our invention, it

of water having the same insulating capacity as a masonry chimney is much thinner than the latter, a considerable amount of space in the building is saved.

In the embodiment shown in Figs. 5 through 9 the building is heated directly by air. For this purpose the flue sections 28 and 28al are sur- As shown in Figs. 6 and '7, a water reservoir 88 is provided in heat exchange relation with the stove or furnace and communicates with the lower end of passage 5I, whereupon vapor generated by the heating of the water in reservoir 88 passes into the air flowing through passage 8|, thus increasing its humidity, as is desirable in the winter.

As is shown in Fig. 7, the wall of the jacket 28a, within which is located the heatingl coil 23, may be corrugated. This not only increases the heat transfer area of the jacket, but also tends to 0 create a more or less circular ow of water within the jacket, which improves the heat transfer between the water and the pipe coil.

While we have shown and described two more is to be understood that this has been done for purposes of illustration only and is not to be considered as limiting the scope of the invention, which is to be' determined by the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. In a heating system, a furnace, a nue providing a path of now for hot gas from said furnace, said flue including a plurality of hollow members joined together for direct flow therethrough of gas, an individual liquid jacket surrounding each of said members and said furnace,

a conduit connecting adjacent jackets for flow therebetween of liquid, a heating coil disposed in the liquidspace of the jacket surrounding one of said members, and conduit means connecting the which is beyond the point of connection of said stove to said iiue considered in the direction of gas flow, whereby said coil is heated by the gas discharged from either said furnace or said stove or both.

3. In a heating system, a furnace, a liquid jacket around said furnace, a flue connected to said furnace, said flue including a plurality of sections connected together for serial fiow therethrough of gas, an individual liquid jacket surrounding each of said sections, a conduit .connecting adjacent jackets, .including the jacket around said furnace, for iiow of liquid therebetween, a stove connected to a section of said flue above said furnace, and a valve in the conduit connecting the jacket around the section to which said stove is connected with the adjacent lower jacket, whereby the jacket below said stove may be disconnected. 1

4.-In a heating system, a furnace, a liquid jacket around said furnace, a flue connected to said furnace, said fiue including a plurality of sections connected together for serial ow therethrough of gas, an individual liquid jacket surrounding each of said sections, a conduit connecting adjacent jackets, including the jacket around said furnace, for flow of liquid therebetween, a stove connected to a section of said flue above said furnace, a heating coll within the jacket around the last-mentioned section, and a valve in the conduit connecting the last-mentioned jacket with the adjacent lower jacket,

whereby the jacket below said heating coil maybe disconnected when said furnace is inoperative.

5. In a heating system, a furnace, a liquid jacket around said furnace, a flue connected to said furnace, said nue including a plurality of sections connected together for serial flow therei through of gas, an individual liquid jacket surrounding each of said sections, a conduit connecting adjacent jackets, including the jacket around said furnace, for iiow of liquid therebetween, a stove connected to a section of said-'nue above said furnace, a valve in the conduit connecting the jacket around the last-mentioned` section with the adjacent lower jacket, a radiator` raving an inlet and an outlet, a conduit connectint9 the jacket around an upper sectiorr` of said flue with the inlet of said radiator, a return conduit connecting the outlet of said radiator with the jacket around said furnace, and a valved conduit connecting the conduit leading to said inlet with the jacket around the section to which the stove is connected.

6. In a heating system, means providing a path of ow for hot gas, said means including a plurality of vertically extending hollow members joined together for direct now therethrough of gas, an individual liquid jacketsurrounding each of said members, means for connecting adjacent jackets for flow therebetween of liquid, continuously open conduit means connecting the uppermost jacket with the lower part of the lowermost jacket, and means forming a path of flow around said jackets for air to be heated.

'7. In a heating system for a multi-room building, a furnace located at the lower part of said building. structure extending through the upper part of said building providing a. path of ilow for ue gases from said furnace, said structure including a plurality of hollow members joined together for direct ow therethrough of gases, an individual liquid jacket surrounding each of said members, means for connecting adjacent jackets for flow therebetween of liquid and means forming a plurality of paths of flow around said jackets for air to be heated, each ofsaid paths communicating with different rooms in said building.

8. In a heating system, a furnace, a nue connected to said furnace, said nue including a plurality of sections connected together for serial flow therethrough of gas, an individual liquid jacket surrounding each of said sections, means for connecting adjacent jackets for flow of liquid therebetween, a radiator, a conduit connecting said radiator with the uppermost of said jackets, a onduit connecting said radiator with the lowermost of said jackets, valve means at said radiator for preventing flow through said radiator, said jackets, conduits and Iradiator constituting a liquid circulating system, means by-passing said radiator and said valve means for connecting said conduits together to provide for continuous circulation through said system, and a hot water heater in heat exchange relation with said system.

9. In a heating system for a building, a furnace, a nue providing a path of now for hot gas "from said furnace, said nue including a plurality of hollowvnembers joined together for direct ilow therethrough of gas, an individual liquid jacket surrounding each of said members and said furnace, a conduit connecting adjacent jackets for now therebetween of liquid, a heating coil disposed in the liquid space of the jacket surrounding one of said members, a conduit means connecting the uppermost jacket with the lower part of the jacket surrounding said furnace in order to provide for continuous liquid circulation, and

means for transferring heat from said jackets to the building. A

CARL GEORG MUNTERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2453954 *Aug 10, 1944Nov 16, 1948Wright Harry TFireplace heating system
US4065055 *Jan 14, 1976Dec 27, 1977Cosimo Michael J DeComplete system for a home air heating and cooling, hot and cold water, and electric power
US4122999 *Mar 17, 1977Oct 31, 1978Belcastro RosarioForced air heating system
US4126118 *Mar 28, 1977Nov 21, 1978Haynes Freddie JModular fireplace assembly
US4158439 *Sep 19, 1977Jun 19, 1979Gibbs John WChimney waste heat collector requiring no building renovation
US4251028 *Sep 25, 1978Feb 17, 1981Richard NicolaiEnergy recovery system for boiler and domestic water
US4276870 *Feb 26, 1980Jul 7, 1981Heard Jr Charles BFireplace device
US4633821 *Aug 1, 1980Jan 6, 1987Cleer Jr Clarence WLiquid heating apparatus
US5305954 *Feb 11, 1993Apr 26, 1994Abel GuentherHeating systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification237/55, 237/56, 122/114, 126/514
Cooperative ClassificationF24D5/00