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Publication numberUS2308526 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1943
Filing dateJul 18, 1939
Priority dateJul 18, 1939
Publication numberUS 2308526 A, US 2308526A, US-A-2308526, US2308526 A, US2308526A
InventorsLook Robert D
Original AssigneeNewspaper Service Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wrapper and protective covering for articles of manufacture and commerce
US 2308526 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E9, 141%. R. D. LOOK 2,303,526

WRAPPER AND PROTECTIVE COVERING FOR ARTICLES V OF MANUFACTURE AND COMMERCE Filed July 18,. 1939 2 SheetS-Sheec l EN-F m 1 JUNE 21,1939

PRICE. 5 CENTS DRINK PEP '71 (IOLA.

Fig. 2

INVENTOR Robert D.Look

5mg. w, 1943'. I R. D. LOCK WRAPPER AND PROTECTIVE COVERING FOR'A RTICLES OF MANUFACTURE AND COMMERCE Filed July 3,8, 1.939-

' mvEfiToK Robert D.L'ook I U 0 I ATTORNEYS Patented Jan. 19, 1943 WRAPPER AND PROTECTIVE COVERING FOR ARTICLES OF IVIANUFACTURE AND COM- MERGE Robert D. Look, Houston, Tex., assignor to Newspaper Service Corporation, Houston, Tex., a

corporation of Texas Application July 18, 1939, Serial No. 285,034

2 Claims.

vide a wrapper of greatly improved and simplified construction, which is particularly well adapted for use as a protective covering for periodicals such as magazines and newspapers and such other articles of flat form as are generally delivered to porches, lawns, etc., and permitted to remain exposed to the elements for varying lengths of time before being taken into the house.

Another object of importance is to provide a wrapper or protective covering of the type indicated, which can be readily produced in very large quantities, and which does not require any expensive or complicated machinery or procedures for its manufacture.

Another object is to provide a protective covering for periodicals such as magazines and newspapers, which can very readily be applied to the periodical at the source of supply or by the delivery boy on his route, which is particularly well adapted to protect the periodical from dirt and moisture and the elements, and which can be removed from'about the protected periodical without undue difiiculty and Without damage to the periodical.

A further object of importance is to provide a protective covering for periodicals and newspapers, which is of attractive appearance, and which furthermore i very well adapted to serve as an effective medium for advertising.

Still another object is to provide a compact and very easily handled package containing a newspaper or other periodical, which package effectively protects the enclosed periodical from such damage and soiling as might otherwise occur during delivery and exposure to the elements.

With several illustrative and preferred embodiments in mind and without intention to limit the invention beyond what is required by the state of the prior art, the invention in its broad aspects consists in providing a fiat blank of cellulosic material having a shallow pocket at one end and having side edges that are adapted to be folded over on the body of the blank.

The blank may be of opaque, transparent or translucent cellulosic material or a combination of such materials, as in case where it is desired to reveal a portion of the periodical, as for example, the masthead. As examples of suitable materials may be mentioned kraft paper, glassine, and Cellophane. A relatively strong material such as kraft paper is preferred, and this material may advantageously be treated with a water-resistant .or repellant material, of which inks.

there are many available on the market. Wax is mentioned as a suitable water repellant material that may advantageously be used. As above stated, other cellulosic materials such as glassine or Cellophane or combinations thereof may be employed. If Cellophane is employed, it should preferably be of the water-resistant variety. In any event the cellulosic material should preferably be of a type that can readily take printing Protective coverings for newspapers and magazines provide an exceptionally effective advertisin medium.

In the accompanying drawings,

Figure 1 is a plan view of one illustrative form of wrapper or protective covering shown in flat form with a conventional form of newspaper inserted therein just prior to folding and sealing the Wrapper about the newspaper;

Figure 2 is a view in perspective of the wrapper or protective covering of Figure l folded and sealed about the newspaper;

Figure 3 is a plan view of another illustrative form of wrapper or protective covering shown in flat form with a conventional form of newspaper in position to be folded with said wrapper;

Figure 4 is a similar View of a modified form of the wrapper or protective covering of Figure 3;

Figures 5 and 6 are a plan view and side view respectively of the wrapper and newspaper of Figure 3 in partly folded condition, the manner of folding being indicated by the use of dash and dot lines and arrows; and

Figures 7 and 8 are a plan view and a side view respectively of the final package formed by tucking the folded portion of the blank into the pocket, the tuckingoperation being indicated by the use of dash and dot lines and arrows.

The wrapper or protective covering of Figure 1 consists of a fiatblank of cellulosic material, one end designated by the numeral I and the adjacent portion 2 and 3 of the side edges being folded over to form a pocket 4 for receiving one edge of a fiat periodical such as the newspaper P. The folded portions I, 2 and 3 may be secured together in any suitable manner as by means of an adhesive. As in the embodiment of the invention to be hereinafter described, the pocket 4 may be formed by folding over the end I and only one of the adjacent side edge portions 2 or 3 instead of both side edge portions 2 and 3.

The reference numerals 5 and 6 designate portions of the side edges of the blank separated from the folded portions 2 and 3 by the slat I and 8. The portions 5 and 6 of the side edges are adapted to be folded over, as indicated in dotted lines, to protect the top and bottom edges of the newspaper or other periodical. The blank may be provided with lines of fold for this purpose.

As thus far described, the wrapper of Figure 1 is particularly well adapted for use in wrapping and protecting a newspaper. As customarily sold, newspapers of conventional form are generally folded once about a line perpendicular to their length. The blank is preferably somewhat longer than the width of the newspaper, so that when one edge of the newspaper is inserted in the pocket 4, the other edge will fall short of the free end of the blank. However, the blank may be made somewhat shorter than the width of the newspaper, in which case the newspaper may be folded once at right angles to the first line of fold, so that in using the wrapper both side edges of the newspaper are inserted in the pocket 4. While the newspaper is being inserted in the pocket, the side edges 5 and 6 of the blank may be in flat condition as indicated in order to facilitate this operation. Then the side edges are folded over the top and bottom of the newspaper, and the blank and the contained newspaper are folded together until the newspaper is entirely enclosed in the wrapper. The wrapper is finally sealed about the newspaper as by means of string, adhesive tape, etc.

As shown in Figure 1, the protective covering is preferably provided with two strips of adhesive tape 9 and i secured in a suitable manner to the underside of the blank at its free end. The outer edges of the strips are in substantial alinement with the lines of fold of the side edges and 6 of the blank. The strips are provided as shown with the adhesive areas H and I2. The adhesive may be of the water-soluble type. The strips of adhesive tape provide particularly simple and effective means for sealing the protective covering about the newspaper, as clearly indicated in Figure 2 of the drawing.

The wrapper or protective covering of Figure 3 consists of a fiat blank of cellulosic material 20 provided at one end with a shallow pocket 2|. The pocket may be formed by folding over the end 22 and the two adjacent side portions 23 and 24 and securing them together by means of adhesive. The reference numeral 25 designates the free end of the blank. The numerals 26 and 21 denote two side flaps, which are adapted to be folded over on the body of the blank.

The wrapper or protective covering of Figure 4 consists of a flat blank of cellulosic material 30 provided at one end with a shallow pocket 3|. The pocket may be formed by folding over the end 32 and one of the two adjacent side portions 33. The other adjacent side portion is left unfolded so that the pocket has an open side edge 34. The numeral 35 designates the free end of the blank, and the numerals 35 and 31 denote the two side fiaps, which are adapted to be folded over on the body of the blank.

In the two embodiments illustrated in Figures 3 and 4, the flat portion of the blank is somewhat shorter than the width of the newspaper. in using these embodiments, the newspaper is folded once at right angles to the first line of fold, and is placed entirely on the flat portion of the blank as shown in Figures 3 and 4. The side flaps 26 and 21 (Figure 3) are then folded over so as to protect the top and bottom edges of the newspaper. The fiat portion of the blank with the superposed newspaper is then folded toward the pocket 2| as indicated in Figures 5 and 6. This operation brings the free end 25 of the blank in close proximity to the mouth of the pocket and forms the line of fold 28. Then the doubled blank is folded again on the free edge 25 and tucked into the pocket 2| as shown in Figures 7 and 8.

In the case of the modified cover of Figure 4, the last operation above described leaves a loose edge 34. This edge is finally tucked into the package between the folds of the newspaper.

It will be understood from the foregoing description that by means of the present invention, I have succeeded in providing an exceedingly simple and effective protective covering for periodicals, which can be readily and quickly applied by unskilled and inexperienced help to periodicals of greatly varying thicknesses, and which can be very easily removed from about the periodica1 without damage to the periodical. A newspaper wrapped and sealed as above described forms a small compact package which can be thrown by a newsboy as far or hard as necessary without damage, and the newspaper will be effectively protected from dirt, moisture or the elements and maintained in a clean, neat, readable condition even if left on an exposed porch or lawn for hours at a time. Furthermore, the protective newspaper provides a very attractive package, and the entire outer surface of the covering is available for receiving advertising matter. This is a very important consideration, as the advertising should in addition to absorbing the cost of the wrapper provide a source of revenue to the newspaper. For newspapers as a general rule are sold and delivered at a price far below the actual cost of production.

In conclusion, it is to be distinctly understood that while in order to comply with the statutes invention has been described in language more or less specific as to certain structural features, nevertheless the invention is not limited to any specific details, but that the means and construction herein described comprise but one mode of putting the invention into effect, and that changes in form, proportions, detail construction and arrangements of parts may be made without departing from the principle or underlying concent of the invention.

I claim:

1. A package consisting of the combination of a protective covering and a periodical, the covering being of cellulosic material provided at one end with a shallow pocket receiving one edge of the periodical in folded fiat form, the blank being somewhat wider and longer than the fiattened periodical, the side edges of the blank being folded over at the top and bottom edges of the periodica1 and only partially covering the same, and the blank with said periodical being folded transversely and progressively along the longitudinal axis from said pocket to the opposite end to entirely enclose the periodical, and a strip of sealing tape secured adjacent to each edge of the blank and sealing the blank about the periodical against unfolding.

2. A package consisting of the combination of a protective covering and a periodical, the covering being of cellulosic material provided at one end with a shallow pocket receiving one edge of the periodical in folded flat form, the blank being somewhat wider and longer than the flattened periodical, the side edges of the blank being folded over at the top and bottom edges of the periodica1 and only partially covering the same, and the blank with said periodical being folded transversely and progressively along the longitudinal axis from said pocket to the opposite end to entirely enclose the periodical, and means sealing the blank about the periodical against unfolding.

ROBERT D. LOOK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2637380 *Jan 11, 1949May 5, 1953Clopay CorpWindow cornice
US3002324 *Jun 29, 1956Oct 3, 1961Deaconson James NMail-room method of packaging newspapers and newspaper distribution package
US4505424 *Apr 13, 1984Mar 19, 1985Chappars George SContainer for displaying and storing flat articles selectively in flattened or cylindrical form
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/87.5, 229/92
International ClassificationB65D27/04, B65D75/04, B65D27/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D27/04, B65D75/04
European ClassificationB65D75/04, B65D27/04