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Publication numberUS2309000 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1943
Filing dateNov 26, 1940
Priority dateNov 26, 1940
Publication numberUS 2309000 A, US 2309000A, US-A-2309000, US2309000 A, US2309000A
InventorsSimon Morrison
Original AssigneeSimon Morrison
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary lipstick holder
US 2309000 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 19, 1943, s. MORRISON 2,309,000

ROTARY LIPSTICK HOLDER Filed Nov` 26, 1940 /IIII INVEKTOR ATTORNEYS Patented Jan. 19, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ROTARY LIPSTICK HOLDER Simon Morrison, New Brunswick, N. J-.

Application November 26, 1940, Serial No. 367,157 y Y (Cl. 20G-56) 9 Claims.

This invention relates to lipstick holders used for housing lipstick and rendering the same readily available for application to the lips. The invention is particularly applicable to rotary lipstick holders, i. e., holders of the type in which the lipstick is housed in a cylindrical container and is projected therefrom for use by rotation of an operating head relative to the exterior casing of the container proper.

Lipsticks are usually made of a soft colored composition used for coloring the lips. However, the identical holders are sometimes used for sticks of cocoa butter, styptic material, etc. It is convenient to still refer to the holders as lipstick holders when they are so used; and that term as used herein includes such uses.

Rotary lipstick holders are conventionally provided -with a protective dust cap that is applied to the holder when the same is notbeing used for applying lipstick. This protective cap is of inverted cup-shape and covers the mouth of the holder from which the lipstick is projected for use. When the cap is in use it is held in place on the holder by the depending `cylindrical skirt of the cap which frictionally embraces the outer casing of the holder proper. When such a lipstick holder is beingr carried in a pocketbook or handbag, it often happens that shifting and turning of the contents of the bag causes relative rotation between the operating head and the dust cap, which relative rotation is transmitted to the embraced casing of the holder proper, thereby advancing the lipstick. This brings the lips-tick in engagement with the dust cap, thereby deforming the lipstick, smearing it around, and in some instances more or less gumming up or jamming the operating mechanism. The same sort of diiculty, in even more marked degree, is often caused by lipstick owners twirling them yidly in their hands while sitting and talking in restaurants, etc. Often the owner will idly turn the operating head while the dust cap is in place, thereby quite forcibly jamming the lipstick against the dust cap and squeezing it into crevices of the mechanism.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a rotary lipstick holder which is protected against inadvertent or accidental advancing of the lipstick while the protective dust cap is in place.

A more specic object of the invention 1s to provide a rotary lipstick holder including a dust cap from which rotary movement cannot be transmitted to the operating casing of the holder proper.

A further object of the invention is to provide a lipstick holder having a dust cap detachably secured in protective or carrying position in an improved manner.

Fig. 1 of the drawings is an enlarged elevational view of a lipstick holder embodying the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a central vertical section of the holder shown in Fig. 1, on a still larger scale.

Fig. 3 is an isometric view of the operating head and operating ngers which are secured thereto.

Fig. 4 is an elevation of the operating casing shown in Fig. 2, this casing being the exterior casing of the holder proper.

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the stick carrier shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a horizontal section taken on line 6 6 of Fig. 2.

With the exception of the operating head, the various parts are preferably made of sheet metal (for example, brass); and as usual, the thickness of sheet metal is exaggerated in the drawing. The operating head may be made in a single piece on an automatic screw machine, brass being a suitable material. The exterior parts of the holder may be finished or decorated inany suitable and desired manner.

A cylindrical sheet metal shell or casing, designated as a whole by I0, has its upper portion necked in at II and further necked in at Ila. The upper end of this shell is formed into an inturned annular flange I2. On the outer wall of the cylinder I0 there are various indentations such as I3 which are all part of one or more series of vindentations corresponding to a single or multiple thread respectively. These indentations are preferably of spherical form, i. e., the surface of each indentation corresponds in shape to the curved surface of a segment of a sphere.

Preferably these indentations are arranged in a plurality of vertical rows on the cylinder I0, but all of the indentations also lie on a helical path or paths on the cylinder I0. In the particular arrangement shown in the drawing there are' two vertical rows of indentations I3 positioned diametrically opposite on the cylinder I0. There are also two helical paths corresponding to a double thread, i. e., there are two interspersed parallel helical paths, alternate indentations lying on one path and the intermediate indentations lying on the other path. Since the shell is made of sheet Vmetal, the indentations I3 are accompanied by corresponding spherical protuberances I4 on the interior of shell l0. Adjacent the bottom of the cylinder III there may be provided one or more instruck spring tabs I5 (two shown) which may be utilized in assembling the lipstick holder.

The carrier, designated as a whole by I8, comprises a bearing skirt I9, a thimble portion Ita, a cup or socket 20, and an annular ange 2i which acts as a connecting means that unites the skirt and socket. Parts I9, I9a and 2| are formed in one piece. The cup or socket 20 is a. separate piece, having a hole 20a in its bottom and being prick-punched connected as at 20h to thimble ISa. As usual, the cup 20 is adapted to receive and support a lipstick S. On the exterior of smrt I3 there is formed a male thread 22 of rounded cross section. In the particular form shown in the drawing this thread is a double thread, corresponding to the double thread arrangement of the protuberances I4. The annular ange 2| is pierced by two arcuate slots 2Q, 2d, for a purpose that will be explained later.

The operating head 23 may be formed in one piece, and it has a'cylindrical grip portion 23a, a superimposed portion 23h of smaller diameter and a top portion 23e of still smaller diameter. The grip portion 23a may be provided with grooves 25a which are ornamental and make this portion somewhat easier to grasp by the user. The portion 23h is grooved at 25h, leaving a projecting annular ilange 26. The upper portion 23e is grooved at 25e, leaving an annular ilange 21. Projecting upwardly from the top of the operating head is an integral boss 29 which is adapted to be cut or swaged so as to act as a rivet.` Attached to the operating head 23 by the rivet formation 29 is an operating member designated as a whole by 30. Member 30 has a tubular bottom portion 3i that is provided with an end wall 32 which is non-circularly pierced at its center for xed attachment to the operating head by the rivet member 29, as shown in Fig. 2. Projecting upwardly from the tubular portion 2I are two standards or fingers 34, 34, each of which is of arcuate cross section, since these standards are continuations of sectors of the tubular portion 3| When the member 30 is assembled on the head 23, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, these two parts are so related that rotation of head 23 rotates member 30.

The carrier I8 is screwed into the cylindrical shell or casing I from the bottom, the tabs I5 being located on continuations of the helical paths established by protuberances I. The standards 3d, 3ft are inserted from the bottom through the slots 2d, 24 and the upper iiange 21 of the head 23 is forcibly telescoped into the bottom of the cylinder I0. This causes the spring tabs I5, I to snap into the annular groove 25e and thereby hold the parts together. In the alternative the cylindrical casing Il] can be initially formed without the tabs I5, I5, and after assembly with respect to the operating head, metal can be punched from the bottom of sleeve I0 as at I5, I5 to project into groove 25o and hold the parts together.

It will be noted from Fig. 2 that the standards or fingers 34, 34 make a bearing t with the exterior surface of thimble I9a and also with the interior surface of the necked in portion IIa of tube I0. The cylindrical surface of the skirt I3 also makes a suitable bearing fit on the interior cylindrical surface of the casing I0. Thus, the

various parts mutually engage and support one to the casing i0. When so rotated, the stand arde 85, 8i impart rotary motion to the carrier I8. Rotation of the carrier I8 causes the helically disposed protuberances I4 to exert a longitudinal force on the thread 22, with the result that the carrier is moved longitudinally in the casing IU. Thus, the lipstick S is readily projected for use and then retracted again for carriage.

The holder proper is provided with a removable dust cap 35 which telescopes over the top of the holder and makes a loose or non-friction t wilth the exterior of casing I Il. This cap extends the full length of the casing and its lower end is enlarged at 33 to telescope over the ilange 26. as shown in Fig. 2. Struck inwardly from the lower portion 3S of the dust cap are small portions 31, 31 forming internal protuberances that snap into the groove 25h when the cap is in place. Considering together the enlarged portion 36 of the dust cap and the struck-in portions 31, 31, the dust cap makes a swivel engagement with the operating head when the cap is in place. Due to the loose nt between the body of the dust cap 35 and the exterior of casing I0, the dust cap also makes a swivel t with casing I0. It will be seen, therefore, that if the head 23 be rotated accidentally or otherwise while the dust cap is in place the casing I0 will likewise freely rotate within the dust cap 35 and therefore no relative rotation can occur between the head 23 and the casing I0. Thus the lipstick cannot be accidentally or inadvertently advanced while the dust cap 35 is in place, and the owner can use the device as a toy and twirl the operating head idly if she chooses.

To use the lipstick tne dust cap 35 is simply pulled off of the holder, whereupon the holder can be operated in the usual manner t0 advance and retract the lipstick.

In compliance with the patent statutes, I have shown the best form in which I have contemplated applying my invention. It will be understood, however, that the disclosure is illustrative of the invention, not limited.

What I claim is:

l. In a rotary lipstick holder having a casing, an operating head rotatable relative to the casing to advance and retract a lipstick, and a telescopic closure cap for the casing; the improvement which comprises: the closure cap loosely fitting the casing and being swivelly connected to the operating head, whereby the holder is protected against accidental relative rotation between the operating head and said casing.

2. In a rotary lipstick holder having a casing, an operating head rotatable relative to the casing to advance and retract a lipstick, and a telescopic closure cap for the casing; the improvement which comprises: the closure cap loosely fitting the casing and being swivelly connected to the operating head by a quick-detachable connection, whereby the holder is protected against accidental relative rotation between the operating head and said casing.

3. In a rotary lipstick holder having a casing, an operating head rotatable relative to the casing to advance and retract a lipstick, and a telescopic closure cap for the casing; the improvement which comprises: the closure cap loosely tting the casing and covering the casing throughout substantially its entire length, and there being means to swivelly hold the closure cap in protective position; whereby the holder is protected against accidental relative rotation between the operating head and said casing.

4. In a rotary lipstick holder having a casing,

an operating head rotatable relative to the casing to advance and retract a lipstick, and a telescopic closure cap for the casing; the improvement which comprises: the closure cap loosely tting the casing and covering the casing throughout substantially its entire length, and there being quick-detachable swivel means to hold the closure cap in protective position; whereby the holder is protected against accidental relative rotation between the operating head and said casing.

5. In a rotary lipstick holder having a casing, an operating head rotatable relative to the casing to advance and retract a lipstick, and a telescopic closure cap for the casing; the improvement which comprises: the operating head being provided with `an annular groove, and the closure cap being provided with retaining means engaging said groove and swivelly attaching the closure cap to the operating head.

6. In' a rotary lipstick holder having a casing, an enlarged operating head rotatable relative to the casing to advance and retract a lipstick, and a telescopic closure cap for the casing; the improvement which comprises: the closure cap inclosing the casing throughout its entire length and being provided with an enlarged end portion telescoping over the upper part of the operating head, and said head and said end portion being provided with interitting relatively rotatable formations securing the closure cap in place and swivelly connecting the closure cap to the operating head.

'7. In a rotary lipstick holder having a casing, an enlarged operating head rotatable relative to the casing to advance and retract a lipstick, and

Cil

a telescopic closure cap for the casing; the improvement which comprises: the closure cap inclosing loosely iitting the casing throughout its entire length and being provided with an en,- larged end portion telescoping over the upper part of the operating head, and said head and vided with inwardly projecting means which snap into said groove and swivelly secure the closure cap to said head.

9. In a rotary lipstick holder having a casing, an enlarged operating head rotatable relative to the casing to advance and retract a lipstick, and a telescopic closure cap for the casing, the improvement which comprises: the closure cap inclosing the casing throughout its entire length and being provided with an enlarged end portion telescoping over the upper part of the operating head, said head being provided with an annular groove and said end portion being provided with inwardly projecting means which snap into said groove and secure the closure cap to said head.

' SIMON MORRISON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2491723 *May 3, 1947Dec 20, 1949Gelardin AlbertLipstick case
US2521140 *Oct 26, 1945Sep 5, 1950Bridgeport Metal Goods Mfg CoCosmetic holder
US2521167 *May 29, 1947Sep 5, 1950Bridgeport Metal Goods Mfg CoCosmetic holder
US2521169 *May 29, 1947Sep 5, 1950Bridgeport Metal Goods Mfg CoCosmetic holder
US2522952 *Sep 27, 1946Sep 19, 1950Joseph KrohnTobacco container
US2523457 *Aug 20, 1947Sep 26, 1950Clark Stephen JLipstick holder
US2546195 *Nov 16, 1948Mar 27, 1951Chase Brass & Copper CoLipstick container
US2695028 *Sep 24, 1948Nov 23, 1954Murray DulbergCosmetic receptacle
US2964172 *Mar 31, 1958Dec 13, 1960Eyelet Specialty DivisionCosmetic container
US3416868 *Apr 20, 1966Dec 17, 1968Int Silver CoLipstick or the like container
US4149552 *May 4, 1978Apr 17, 1979Stewmon Billy JFountain brush
US5076720 *Feb 13, 1990Dec 31, 1991Carine RogerDispensing casings for solidified products
US5609430 *Dec 22, 1994Mar 11, 1997Avon Products, Inc.Dispensing device for semi-solid products
US5680946 *Aug 24, 1995Oct 28, 1997Spatz LaboratoriesSealable container
US6082372 *Jan 6, 1999Jul 4, 2000Katsushika Co., Ltd.Dispenser container for rod-like cosmetic
US6513536Aug 22, 2000Feb 4, 2003Demellier Joulia SarlRotary holder
US6955013 *Sep 26, 2002Oct 18, 2005Thompson Harry AEnd cap locking mechanism for connecting pre-cast concrete structures
US20040062601 *Sep 26, 2002Apr 1, 2004Thompson Harry A.End cap locking mechanism for connecting pre-cast concrete structures
US20060059805 *Oct 11, 2005Mar 23, 2006Thompson Harry AEnd cap locking mechanism for connecting pre-cast concrete structures
EP0734664A1 *Apr 27, 1994Oct 2, 1996Katsushika Co., LtdCosmetic stick case
EP0734664A4 *Apr 27, 1994Nov 20, 1996Katsushika Co LtdCosmetic stick case
EP0865743A3 *Jan 26, 1998Oct 27, 1999Techpack Espana S.L.Improved mechanical container for barshaped products
EP1078583A1 *Aug 21, 2000Feb 28, 2001Demellier Joulia SARLImproved rotating case
WO2012135434A1 *Mar 29, 2012Oct 4, 2012Diane BreidenbachImproved product applicator
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/61, 401/75
International ClassificationA45D40/12, A45D40/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45D40/12
European ClassificationA45D40/12