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Publication numberUS2309102 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1943
Filing dateAug 16, 1941
Priority dateAug 16, 1941
Publication numberUS 2309102 A, US 2309102A, US-A-2309102, US2309102 A, US2309102A
InventorsBurghoff Henry L, Crampton Donald K
Original AssigneeChase Brass & Copper Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Copper base alloy
US 2309102 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Jan. 26, 1943 COPPER BASE ALLOY Donald K. Crampton, Marion, and Henry L.

Burghoff, Waterbury, Conn., assignors to Chase Brass & Copper 00. Incorporated, Waterbury,

Conn.', a corporation No Drawing. Application August 16, 1941, Serial No. 407,218

4 Claims. (01. 148-32l This invention relates to improvements in copper-base alloys.

One object of this invention is to provide improved cooper-base alloys having good physical and corrosion-resistant properties.

Other objects of this invention will appear from the present disclosure.

We have invented improved copper-base alloys having tin from 2% to 10%, phosphorus from 0.05% to 0.3%, nickel from 0.35% to 2% with the phosphorus being from A; to of the nickel by Weight, and the remainder substantially of copper, the copper being from 88% to 97.5%, and the total of the copper and tin being at least 97.5%. Another alloy range is to have the tin from 2% to 8%, the phosphorus from 0.05% to 0.3%, the'nickel from 0.35% to 1.5%, and the balance substantially of copper, the copper being from 90% to 97.5%, and the total of the copper and tin being at least 97.5% One preferred alloy is tin about 2%, phosphorus about 0.2%, nickel about 1%, and the balance substantially of copper. Another preferred alloy is tin about 5%, phosphorus about 0.1%, nickel about 0.5%, and the balance substantially of copper.

If any lead is to be present in the alloy, it should not exceed 1.5% as it embrittles the alloy so asto interfere with metal working operations usedin producing wrought articles and shapes from the alloy. If any aluminum or silicon or chromium is to be present in the alloy, the amount of the aluminum or silicon or chromium should not exceed 0.1% as these elements result in refractory and abrasive oxides which cause rapid wear on the fabricating tools and dies.

These alloys are age-hardenable and possess desirable high yield-strength with good ductility and tensile strength in their age-hardened con dition. They also have excellent wear-resistance and excellent spring-making properities with less cold-working than is necessary with ordinary tin bronzes of similar tin content. They also have good corrosion-resistance to saline solutions.

The alloys of the invention can be rendered soft and ductile by annealing or heating at temperature in the range from about 1200 F. to about 1600 F. to constitute a solution treatment for the age-hardening nickel and phosphorus material, and quenching or cooling sufliciently rapidly from such temperature to hold agehardening material in solution, and can be subsequently age-hardened by re-heating or aging at temperature in the range from about 600 F. to about 1050 F. for-from about one-half to six hours or longer, depending on the temperature,

to precipitate age-hardening material out of solution.

One notable thing about the alloys of this invention is that those of lower tin content achieve as high hardness and strength as those of higher tin content, when in the age-hardened condition. This is remarkable for it is well known that the hardness and strength of ordinary tin bronze increases with tin content. This important fact concerning our improved alloys makes possible a considerable saving in alloy cost due to the saving of costly tin, and in production cost, for the alloys of higher tin content are ordina.'ily processed only with diificulty.

The invention may be carried out in other specific ways'than those herein set forth without departing from the spirit and essential characteristics of the invention, and the present em-. bodiments are, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive and all changes coming within the meaning and equivalency range of the appended claims are intended to be embraced therein.

We claim:

1. A hardened copper-base alloy consisting substantially of tin from 2% to 10%; phosphorus from 0.05% to 0.3%; nickel from 0.35% to 2% with the phosphorus being from to t; of the nickel by weight; and the balance substantially of copper, the copper being at least 88% and the total of the copper and tin being at least 97.5%;

and the alloy having been given a solution treatment by having been suitably cooled from temperature in the range from about 1200 F. to about 1600 F. and having been hardened by having been given a precipitation treatment at temperature in the range from about 600 F. to about 1050 F.

2. A hardened copper-base alloy consisting substantially of: tin from 2% to 3%; phosphorus from 0.05% to 0.3%; nickel from 0.35% to 1.5%

' with the phosphorus being from to 6 of the nickel by weight; and the balance substantially of copper, the copper being at least 90% and the total of the copper and tin being at least 97.5%; and the alloy having been given a solution treatment by having been suitably cooled from temperature in the range from about 1200 F. to about 1600 F. and having been hardened by having been given a precipitation treatment at temperature in the range from about 600 F. to about 1050 F.

3. A hardened copper-base alloy consisting substantially of tin about 2%; phosphorus about 0.2%; nickel about 1%; and-the balance substantially of copper, the total of the copper and tin being at least 97.5%; and the alloy having been given a solution treatment by having been suitably cooled from temperature in the range from about 1200 F. to about 1600 F. and having been hardened by having been given a precipitation treatment at temperature in the range from about 600 F. to about 1050 F.

DONALD K. CRAMPTON. HENRY L. BURGHOFF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4486250 *Sep 19, 1983Dec 4, 1984Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaCopper-based alloy and method for producing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification148/412
International ClassificationC22C9/02
Cooperative ClassificationC22C9/02
European ClassificationC22C9/02