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Publication numberUS2309268 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1943
Filing dateJan 15, 1941
Priority dateJan 15, 1941
Publication numberUS 2309268 A, US 2309268A, US-A-2309268, US2309268 A, US2309268A
InventorsRudolf Noske
Original AssigneeRudolf Noske
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prismatic system
US 2309268 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 26, 1943. R. NGSKE 2,309,268

PRISMATIC SYSTEM T25 Filed Jan. 15, 1941 INVENTOR, RUDOLF NOS/(E.

A770 NEK Patented Jan. 26, 1943 Search Room UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 4 Claims.

The present invention relates to improvements in a prismatic system, and its principal object is to provide a system of the character described that is extremely simple in construction.

A further object of my invention is to provide a system of the character-described in which a plurality of prismatic reflectors are interconnected and held in operative position with respect to one another by a connecting piece formed integral with the prismatic reflectors whereby the entire system i made as a one-piece, unitary structure, the connecting piece being preferably made of the same material as the reflectors.

A still further object of the invention is to join a plurality of prismatic reflectors by a single connecting piece which holds the reflectors in operative and spaced relation for reflecting light rays in a desired manner and which is off-set with respect to the reflectors so as to leave a clear path for the light rays.

It is further proposed to arrange the connecting piece and the reflectors in a single unit in complementary relation to form a simple geometrical body, such as a cylinder or a polygonal block adapted for endwise insertion into a similarly shaped chamber forming part of the instrument in connection with which the system is to be used, such as a telescope, a field glass, range-finder or other optical instrument.

And finally, it is proposed to provide a unitary prismatic system of the character described in which the outline of the device, if polygonal, may be used for properly positioning the system with respect to the chamber holding the same, or in which, where a cylindrical form is used, the connecting piece may be formed with proper guide grooves or ridges or other means for positioning the unit in its chamber.

Further objects and advantages of my invention will appear as the specification proceeds, and the novel features thereof will be fully set forth in the claims hereto attached.

The preferred forms of my invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawing, forming part of this application, in which:

Figure 1 is a side view of my prismatic unit;

Figure 2, an end view of the same;

Figure 3, an end view from the other end;

Figure 4, an isometric view of the same, and

Figure 5, an isometric view of a modified form of my unit.

While I have shown only the preferred forms of my invention, I wish to have it understood that various changes or modifications may be made within the scope of the claims hereto attached, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

In its preferred form, my prismatic unit I, as shown in Figures 1-4, inclusive, comprises two prismatic reflectors 2 and 3 and a connecting piece 4.

Each reflector may be described as being part cf a semi-cylindrical block, having a flat diametrical face 5, a semi-cylindrical face 6 opposing the same, a fiat base I and two angular reflecting faces 8 and 9 opposite the latter, the angular faces forming a right angle between the same.

When a ray of light enters perpendicularly through the base 1, it strikes one of the angular faces, say face 9, is deflected to strike the other face 8, and is again reflected to return through the base I, in perpendicular direction and parallel to the incoming ray.

The connecting piece 4 is shown, in Figures 1-4. inclusive, as comprising a quarter-section cf a cylinder, of the same diameter as the cylinder from which the reflectors are made, and having a, quarter-round face l0 and two flat radial faces II and 12 forming a right angle between the same.

The two reflectors 2 and 3 are permanently and integrally secured to opposite ends of the connecting piece 4 so as to project laterally, one from one of the flat faces and the other from the second flat face, with their base faces 1 opposing one another in parallel and semi-overlapping relation, which brings two of the reflecting faces, indicated at 5, opposite one another while providing clear paths of entry and exit for the other two reflecting faces 8. The cylindrical faces of the reflectors and the connecting piece all lie in the same cylindrical plane.

Describing the arrangement in detail, the diametrical face 5 of the reflector 3 has that portion of it lying opposite the reflecting face 8 secured upon the flat face l2 of the connecting piece, the contacting faces overlapping just sufficiently for suitable anchoring, as at l5. This causes the connecting piece 4, in end view (see Figure 3), to occupy a quarter of the circle and the reflector to occupy that one-half of the circle adjacent the face l2 of the connecting piece.

The other reflector 2 is similarly secured, at the other end of the connecting piece I, to the face ll thereof, so as to occupy that one-half of the circle adjacent said face II. This arrangement brings the two reflecting faces 9 opposite one another, while the two reflecting faces 8 are unopposed.

The connecting piece 4, occupying that quarter of the circle left unoccupied by the reflectors does not interfere with the travel of the light rays.

In operation, referring particularly to the isometric view of Figure 4, the path of a light ray is indicated by the broken line, the points of entry, reflection and exit being indicated by dots.

The light ray, paralleling the connecting piece, passes the reflector 3 through the quarter space left unoccupied by both the reflector and the connecting piece 4, enters the reflector 2 through the base 1, strikes the reflecting face 8, is diverted to the reflecting face 9, returns through the base I, paralleling itself, enters the first reflector 3 through its base I, is diverted by its reflecting face 9, strikes the reflecting face 8 and is turned back, again paralleling itself, to pass the second reflector through that quarter-circle left unoccupied by the reflector 2 and the connecting piece.

The outer face of the unit is cylindrical and will fit into any similar cylindrical chamber. It may be held against rotation by any suitable means, for instance, by the groove IS in the connecting piece fitting over a suitable rib in the chamber.

The two reflectors and the connecting piece are preferably made of one piece of material, such as glass or other transparent plastic, and may be manufactured by any suitable method.

The form of my invention shown in Figure 5 is built on the same principle and operates in the same manner, the only difference being that the unit is made in the form of a rectangular block instead of a cylinder. In that case the groove l6 may be omitted, since the rectangular block will position itself automatically when introduced into a similarly shaped chamber.

I claim:

1. A unitary prism structure adapted for sliding insertion into a tube comprising a pair of prismatic reflectors, each having a base, a pair of reflecting faces and an end face, and a linear connecting member having its ends secured to the end faces of the prisms for supporting the latter in spaced and semi-overlapping relation with the bases facing one another, the outer faces of the prisms and of the connecting member being shaped to lie within the surface of a rectilinear 'body having a sliding fit with the tube.

2. A unitary prism structure adapted for sliding insertion into a tube, comprising a rectilinear supporting member having two side faces arranged at a right angle to one another, a pair of prisms, each having a base, a pair of reflecting faces and an end face, means for securing the end face of one of the prisms to the end of one of the side faces along a narrow overlap and means for similarly securing the end of the other prism to the opposite end of the other side face, the outer faces of the prisms and the supporting member being shaped to lie within the surface of a rectilinear body having a sliding fit with the tube.

3. A unitary prism structure adapted to have a sliding fit in a cylindrical chamber, the said prism structure comprising a rectilinear holding piece occupying a one-quarter section of the chamber and having an outer face contacting a quarter of said chamber and two radial faces at right angles to one another, a prismatic reflector of semi-cylindrical contour secured to one of the faces at one end of the holding piece to occupy one half of the chamber outside the holding piece, and a second prismatic reflector secured to the other face at the other end of the holding piece to occupy one half of the chamber outside the holding piece, the two reflectors being arranged in semi-overlapping relation with respect to one another.

4. A unitary prism structure adapted to have a sliding fit in a rectilinear chamber of regular cross-section, the said prism structure comprising a rectilinear holding piece occupying a one quarter section of the chamber and having an outer face contacting a quarter of said chamber and two inner faces at right angles to one another, a prismatic reflector secured to one of the inner faces at one end of the holding piece to occupy one half of the chamber outside the holding piece, and a second prismatic reflector secured to the other inner face at the other end of the holding piece to occupy one half of the chamber outside the holding piece, the two reflectors being arranged in semi-overlapping relation with respect to one another.

RUDOLF NOSKE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423267 *Jul 14, 1944Jul 1, 1947Barr & Stroud LtdOptical system for periscopes
US2781494 *Mar 18, 1953Feb 12, 1957Lab For Electronics IncUltrasonic delay lines
US2858727 *Jun 30, 1954Nov 4, 1958American Cyanamid CoDevice for the measurement of absolute turbidity
US4746201 *Jan 16, 1978May 24, 1988Gordon GouldPolarizing apparatus employing an optical element inclined at brewster's angle
Classifications
U.S. Classification359/836, 359/732
International ClassificationG02B5/04
Cooperative ClassificationG02B5/04
European ClassificationG02B5/04